East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society

October 29, 2014
by wxie
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Nov 4 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

 

Governing on the Edge: State and Informal Housing in China and Brazil

 

Yue Zhang

Associate Professor

Department of Political Science

University of Illinois at Chicago

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

November 4, 2014

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract

More than half of the world’s population lives in cities today and most of this expansion has occurred in urban centers of the Global South. One of the most important and common characteristics of urban growth in southern metropolises is the development of informal housing that falls outside of government control or regulation. The phenomenon of urban informality not only challenges our notion of what constitutes a city but also provides a unique lens to interrogate property ownership and state-society relations. Drawing from her ongoing book project, Yue Zhang will discuss the production and governance of informal housing settlements in China and Brazil. The study demonstrates that informality must be understood not as the object of state regulation but rather as produced by the state itself. In contrast to the standard dichotomy between the formal and the informal, the study reveals the differentiation within informality. Different types of informal mobilization and informal politics in China and Brazil have shaped the urban land regime in various ways, eventually creating different forms of informal housing.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Wen Xie (wxie@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

 

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

October 20, 2014
by wxie
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A Conversation with David Barboza, October 24

The East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society and the Chicago Chinese Social Research Group Present:

Reporting From China: A Conversation with David Barboza, New York Times Shanghai Correspondent

Date: Friday, October 24th, 2014, 4:30 – 6pm
Location: The University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy, Lecture Hall (room 142), 1155 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637

This event is free and open to the public. Please R.S.V.P. online at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1TOaN1sql6q_y52EJzvFQ3NTFgESYXbzNNp9vpb7gEUg/viewform by 5pm on October 22nd.

For inquiries, email Wen Xie at wxie@uchicago.edu. Persons with disabilities who may need assistance should contact the Office of Programs & External Relations at 773-753-2274 in advance.

October 15, 2014
by wxie
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Oct 21 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

 

Settling Symbolic Battles in Workplaces: The Spatial Dynamics of Organizational Responses to Institutional Demands

 

Yuhao Zhuang

Master of Arts Program in the Social Sciences

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

October 21, 2014

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract

The study of organizational responses to institutional demands has been a central concern of organizational sociology. This article examines the mobilization of response strategies in organizations and asks: Under what conditions would organizations fail to respond to external institutional pressures? Data from a two-year ethnography of two Chinese grassroots voluntary groups provide answers and reveal that organizational members were engaged in “symbolic battles” in which these actors perceived an external demand from a state agency differently according to their relevant previous work experiences and strengthened their own perceptions by attaching symbolic meanings to others’ viewpoints. Organizations were more likely to escalate the symbolic battles and discourage the mobilization of organizationally accepted responses when the departments of organizations were spatially isolated from each other. In this circumstance, the spatially fragmented workplace could unify opinions in each department while inhibiting effective negotiations across different departments. These findings advance current understandings of micro-level institutional change by discovering how divergence of members’ opinions and spatial arrangement of workplace may affect response-making processes within organizations.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Wen Xie (wxie@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

 

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

October 5, 2014
by wxie
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Oct 7 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

 

Lying or Believing? Measuring Preference Falsification from a Political Purge in China

 

Junyan Jiang

PhD Student, Department of Political Science

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

October 7, 2014

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

 

Abstract

Despite its wide usage in explaining some nontrivial dynamics in nondemocratic systems, preference falsification remains an empirical myth for students of authoritarian politics. We provide to our knowledge the first quantitative study of preference falsification in an authoritarian setting using a rare coincidence between a major political purge in Shanghai, China, and the administration of a nationwide survey in 2006. We construct two synthetic measures for expressed and actual support from a set of survey questions, and track the changes in these measures before and after the purge. We find that a dramatic increase in expressed support was paralleled by an equally evident decline in actual support in post-purge Shanghai. We interpret this divergence as evidence for the presence of preference falsification. We further find that the variations in the degree of preference falsification are jointly predicted by one’s access to one’s information environment and his/her structural vulnerability to state sanctions. Using two additional surveys conducted over the span of a year, we further show that there was substantial deterioration in political trust in Shanghai six months after the purge, which suggests that falsification could not sustain public support in the long run.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Wen Xie (wxie@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

 

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

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