East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society

March 28, 2017
by yxz
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April 4, Shilin Jia and Linzhuo Li, “New Wine in Old Bottles: Ideological Creation of Market in China’s People’s Daily, 1946-2003”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

 New Wine in Old Bottles: Ideological Creation of Market in China’s People’s Daily, 1946-2003”

 

Shilin Jia and Linzhuo Li

PhD students, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

4:30-6:00 p.m., Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

How could a new ideological regime be established upon and finally substitutes lasting old ideas, institutions, and culture that tend to have strong inertia to persist? For example, one of the most surprising transformations in the 20th century was China’s embrace of market economy under the leadership of a communist party. Such long-term ideological transformations haven’t been analyzed in a systematic way. In this study, we attempt to answer how these transformations could have happened by applying computational content analysis to the full text of the communist party’s mouthpiece, the People’s Daily, from 1946 to 2003. Various exploratory techniques were applied to analyze changing patterns in word frequencies and word embedding spaces in 58 years of newspaper articles. We found that, first, there was persistent path dependency in the party state’s ideology, especially in the economic domain. After the Cultural Revolution, except one or two historical junctures, the party state’s official rhetoric, in the grand scheme, had moved in a very smooth and linear fashion in almost all the time. Second, the transformation was initiated in the late 1970s by first utilizing some existing 1950s repertoires. Third, after some unsuccessful ’trial and error’ in the 1980s, the concept of “market economy” was finally settled down in the mid-1990s in a safe harbor under the main scheme of “socialist reform”. Our methods are useful to detect less-known historical junctures and our findings furthers a Weberian understanding that ideology and culture should be viewed as a semi-autonomous social sphere that interact with other social processes with its own logic.

In the first half of this talk, we’ll introduce the general usefulness of our data analytic techniques in getting rich information from the huge corpus of 58 years of People’s Daily articles. We’ll spend the second half discussing the main findings that are particularly pertinent to our research interest.

About the Speakers

Shilin Jia is a 3rd year PhD student in the Department of Sociology at University of Chicago. He is interested in applying computational methods to studying macro social-historical change and modeling large-scale stochastic social processes in time.

Linzhuo Li is a 3rd year PhD student in the Sociology Department at the University of Chicago. His research interests are mostly related to various kinds of “substitutions”: evolvement of local financial system, reform of credit unions in China, dynamics of online ideology groups and transformation of ideology.

*To learn more about the full Spring 2017 schedule, please visit: Spring Schedule

 

 

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology),  Dali Yang (Political Science),  and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences.

 

 

March 28, 2017
by yxz
0 comments

Spring 2017 Schedule

EAST ASIA WORKSHOP: POLITICS, ECONOMY & SOCIETY

Spring 2017 Workshop Schedule

April 4

“New Wine in Old Bottles: Ideological creation of market in the People’s Daily, 1946-2003”

Shinlin Jia and Linzhuo Li

PhD Students, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

 

April 11

Special China Session: “Chinese Culture: Its characteristics and historical backgrounds” (in Chinese)

Jianxiong Ge (葛剑雄)

Professor, Institute of Chinese Historical Geography

Fudan University

 

April 18

TBD

Li Dong

PhD student, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

 

April 25

Book-Reading Session: “The Souls of China: The return of religion after Mao.”

(Co-hosted with The Seminary Co-op Bookstores)

Ian Johnson

Pulitzer-Prize winning writer

Accredited China correspondent for The New York Times

 

May 2

“Switching sides: Market transition and job-referring in China.”

Elena Obukhova

Assistant Professor, Desautels Faculty of Management

McGill University

 

May 16

“Escaping the interpersonal power game: Social interaction between customers and sales agents in online shopping”

Xiaoli Tian

Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology

University of Hong Kong

May 30

“Perceived Threat and Welfare Distribution in Rural China”

In Hyee Hwang

PhD Candidate, Department of Political Science

University of Chicago

Unless otherwise stated, the East Asia Workshop meets on Every Tuesday 4:30-6 pm at Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Avenue. This workshop features interdisciplinary scholarship addressing topics relating to social, political, economic and cultural matters in East Asia. Our presenters come from different disciplines like sociology, political science, economics, history, and so on.

Faculty Sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology),  Dali Yang (Political Science),  and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences.

 

March 6, 2017
by yxz
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March 7, Wan-Zi Lu, “Structure or Fracture Political Loyalty: Explaining Continuity and Change of Single-Party Support”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents 

 Structure or Fracture Political Loyalty: Explaining Continuity and Change of Single-Party Support”

 

Wan-Zi Lu

PhD student, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

4:30-6:00 p.m., Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

Enduring single-party support has been asserted to weaken as traditional societies transition to modern democracy. However, this assertion fails to recognize the influence from the legacies of former regimes and intergroup relations on each community as a whole. Identifying the importance of relational factors in shaping political loyalty, recent studies argue that party identification is mobilized by community leaders. This study shows that the types of community leadership establish different experiences during democratization, processes during which single-party support appears more likely to fracture in some communities but not in others. To account for durable electoral anomaly of Taiwan’s indigenous communities, where single-party support prevails in spite of common party competition across non-aboriginal constituencies, the study assesses the relationship between the types of authority structures and the durability of single-party support. These aboriginal communities are organized by one of two possible authority structures – chief and big man, contrasted by the nature of power inheritance. Accordingly, the two structures differ in the stability of communal leadership, political opportunities for contenders, resistance to competing institutions, and solidarity in the face of exogenous shocks.

To compare the various degree of party competition among the aboriginal societies, the author primarily conducts ethnographic work and interviews in indigenous tribes. Among indigenous communities where inherited hierarchy decides social prestige (i.e. chief villages), chiefs and headmen have retained their impact on contemporary politics. However, indigenous communities without centralized and inherited leadership (i.e. big man villages) have prevalent cleavages; as competing institutions and exogenous shocks magnify these cleavages and offer channels for rivalry parties to mobilize votes, villagers shift away from the single-party identification. Regression analyses additionally support these findings and suggests generalizable patterns of structural durability.

About the Speaker

Wan-Zi Lu is a third-year PhD student in the Department of Sociology. Her research interests include political sociology and economic sociology. During the past years, she has studied the party identification and the economic transition of the indigenous peoples in Taiwan.

*To learn more about the full Winter 2017 schedule, please visit: Winter Schedule

 

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology),  Dali Yang (Political Science), and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

 

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