November 28th | Qiuchen Wu on “Girls Geist (2019) with Recent Reflections”

Please join the Affect and the Emotions Workshop on

Monday, November 28th, Cochrane-Woods Arts Center 1564:30-6:00pm CT

when

Qiuchen Wu

M.F.A. Candidate, Department of Visual Arts, University of Chicago

presents:

“Girls Geist (2019) with Recent Reflections “

 

Discussant: Yeti Kang, PhD Student, Divinity School

 

 

A nine-minute video featuring a girl sitting and reading presumably her journal about her beloved idol. A less phenomenological description of it would be: an attempt on expressing the grammatical difference between a Hegelian girl and a girlish Hegel.After an installation of this three-year old work in a show, I finally gathered enough amount of uneasewhich forced me to deliberate on its various problematics. I would like to take this workshop as an opportunity to share with you those difficulties (e.g., historical and current intentions; representation and responsibility; identification and plentitude; beauty and competition) with an autobiographical account of my own recent trajectory of becoming a fan in K-pop.

May 23rd || Seth Estrin on “Between Pity and Rage: Constructing Emotion in Archaic Funerary Sculpture”

Please join the Affect and the Emotions Workshop on

Monday, May 23rd, Wieboldt 4084:30-6:00pm CT

when

Seth Estrin

Assistant Professor of Art History and the College; Ancient Greek Art and Archaeology

presents the paper:

“Between Pity and Rage: Constructing Emotion in Archaic Funerary Sculpture”

Discussant: Emily Austin, Assistant Professor of Classics and the College

The history of Greek art has traditionally been traced according to the development of artistic naturalism, and the possibility of emotional expression has usually been associated only with later periods of Greek art, in which this naturalism was fully achieved. In this paper, I look for emotion in an unexpectedly early era of Greek art—the later part of the so-called Archaic period (ca. 550-480 BCE), which produced sculptures normally seen as cold, stiff, and inexpressive. Focusing on a funerary monument for a man named Kroisos, I use the emotional language of the monument’s epigram –specifically, its invocation of pity and rage – as the basis for imagining alternative ways of visualizing the sculpture that accompanied it. In so doing, I seek to activate emotional dimensions of Archaic sculpture that would be otherwise invisible to modern eyes.
The paper, to be read in advance, is available on the workshop website.

If you have any questions or concerns, please email Jane Gordon (jgordon616@uchicago.edu) or Bellamy Mitchell (bellamy@uchicago.edu).

May 16th | Bellamy Mitchell on The Danger of the Situation, or, the Indexical Present of Apology in the Performance Artwork of Adrian Piper and Dr. Vaginal Davis

Please join the Affect and the Emotions Workshop

Monday, May 16th when

Bellamy Mitchell

PhD Candidate, English and Social Thought, University of Chicago

presents the paper:

The Danger of the Situation, or, the Indexical Present of Apology

in the Performance Artwork of Adrian Piper and Dr. Vaginal Davis

Discussant: Leah Pires, Assistant Instructional Professor in the Department of Art History and the MA Program in the Humanities, University of Chicago

Monday, May 16th, Wieboldt 408, 4:30-6:00pm CT

 

Note: We’re planning to go out to dinner after this session. If you’d like to join us, please register your interest using this form by Sunday at noon. Thanks!

If you have any questions or concerns, please email Jane Gordon (jgordon616@uchicago.edu).

Image: Adrian Piper, “My Calling (Card) #1” Image courtesy of the Yale University Art Gallery

May 9th | Special Workshop Event with David Eng on The History of the Subject and the Subject of History

Please join the Affect and the Emotions Workshop, on zoom, on

Monday, May 9th

when

David Eng

Richard L. Fisher Professor of English, and Professor in the Program in Asian American Studies, the Program in Comparative Literature & Literary Theory, and the Program in Gender, Sexuality & Women’s Studies at the University of Pennsylvania School of Arts and Sciences

presents the paper:

The History of the Subject and the Subject of History

for discussion

at 4:30 PM —6:00 PM Central

Materials are available on our website.