March 7 | Blaize Gervais on “Perspectival Objectivity: In Defense of the ‘Affective Turn’ in Epistemology”

Please join the Affect and the Emotions Workshop, remotely, on

Monday, March 7th

when

Blaize Gervais

PhD Candidate in Ethics, University of Chicago Divinity School

presents the paper

Perspectival Objectivity: In Defense of the “Affective Turn” in Epistemology

Discussant: Colin Weaver, PhD Candidate in the Divinity School

This event will take place on Zoom from

4:30-6:00pm CT

This paper addresses concerns about the subjectivity of objectivity through the work of Quill (Rebecca) Kukla. Specifically their work on the separation of aperspectival warrant and ontological objectivity. We defend a potential vulnerability in Kukla’s argument through insights in enactive cognitive science and explore what such a defense means for the role of affect in epistemology writ large.

The paper, to be read in advance, and the Zoom meeting information is available on the website via password. Questions, requests, or concerns may be directed to the coordinators by email.

February 21st || David Cantor-Echols on “Fear and Loathing in Late Medieval Iberia”

Please join the Affect and the Emotions Workshop, remotely, on

Monday, February 21

when

David Cantor-Echols
Social Sciences Teaching Fellow

presents his paper:

“Fear and Loathing in Late Medieval Iberia”

Discussant: Sarah McDaniel, PhD Candidate in the Department of English

the event will take place on Zoom at

4:30-6:00pm CT

This paper examines the function of emotions (namely fear) in the royal-aristocratic bond so foundational to medieval European politics. In an effort to understand why different actors within a elite, homosocial political environment theorized and articulated fear in the ways they did, the paper asks whether the emotion’s expression should be understood as a strategic utterance intended to defuse temporary crises, or whether it was a constitutive feature of its political and institutional context.
Note: The image depicts the assassination of Pedro I of Castile by his half-brother and successor Enrique, both sons of Alfonso XI. The image comes from a late 14th c. edition of the Grandes Chroniques de France (Ms. BnF Français 2813).

January 31st || Alysia Mann Carey on Black Diasporic Politics and Collective Intimacy: Towards a Theory of State Violence as Intimate

Please join the Affect and the Emotions Workshop, remotely, on

Monday, January 31st
when

Alysia Mann Carey

PhD Candidate in the Department of Political Science

presents her paper:

Black Diasporic Politics and Collective Intimacy: Towards a Theory of State Violence as Intimate

Discussant: Michaela Machicote, PhD Candidate in African and African Diaspora Studies at the University of Texas-Austin

the event will take place on Zoom at

4:30-6:00pm CT

The chapter ethnographically examines Black women’s experiences of police violence through the lens of intimacy. This chapter’s central claim is that policing perpetrates a type of intimate violence.

November 15th | Eos Trinidad on “The Irony of Accountability: How a Performance-Inducing Policy Reduces Motivation to Perform”

Please join the Affect and the Emotions Workshop
in-person in Social Sciences Room 302

Monday, November 15th
when

Eos Trinidad

PhD Student, Sociology and Comparative Human Development

presents his paper

“The Irony of Accountability: How a Performance-Inducing Policy Reduces Motivation to Perform”

While researchers have interrogated testing and school accountability’s potentially harmful impacts on teacher behavior, cheating, and stress as well as student outcomes, we know less about how accountability predicts students’ wellbeing, emotion, and motivation. This manuscript explores how accountability could impact students’ motivation to perform and subjective wellbeing, finding important consequences for emotions related to performance but not for social wellbeing or life satisfaction. This research has implications for the quantitative study of emotions, the deeper understanding of school policies, and the potential harms of data-driven programs.

The paper is available on our website, under posts.

Materials for November 8th Session

 

Please join the Affect and the Emotions Workshop, remotely, on

Monday, November 8th when

Isabel Lachenauer
PhD Candidate, Ottoman and Turkish Studies, NELC

presents her paper:

“Through the Looking Glass: Mirror Characters as Windows into the Emotional Community ofʿĀrifʿAlī”

Discussant: Jane Gordon, PhD Student, Assyriology, NELC

the event will take place on Zoom at

 4:30-6:00pm CT

 

Her paper is available here: Lachenauer Ch 2

Join Zoom Meeting
https://uchicago.zoom.us/j/92402604067?pwd=Zngxd29UdHF4eDBlMEoweFVzaE9LZz09

Meeting ID: 924 0260 4067
Passcode: mirror

 

November 8th | Isabel Lachenauer on “Through the Looking Glass: Mirror Characters as Windows into the Emotional Community of ʿĀrifʿAlī”

Please join the Affect and the Emotions Workshop, remotely, on

Monday, November 8th
when

Isabel Lachenauer

PhD Candidate, Ottoman and Turkish Studies, NELC

presents her paper:

“Through the Looking Glass: Mirror Characters as Windows into the Emotional Community ofʿĀrifʿAlī”

Discussant: Jane Gordon, PhD Student, Assyriology, NELC

the event will take place on Zoom at

 4:30-6:00pm CT

Description: This second chapter of my dissertation, “Artūḫı Wept: Reading Emotions in ʿĀrif ʿAlī’sDānişmendnāme,” looks at never-before studied poems in the fourteenth-century Old Anatolian Turkish redaction of the popular epicDānişmendnāmeto reveal how its author employed novel and sophisticated literary devices to sway his audience’s emotions in certain ways at “appropriate” times. I argue that the principal way ʿĀrif ʿAlī accomplished this was through mirror characters, literary devices which serve as “go-betweens” between text and audience by demonstrating and appealing to the emotions the audience should be feeling and when. Drawing on the theories of Barbara Rosenwein and Frank Brandsma, I argue that analyzing mirror characters like the warrior Artūḫı bridges author, text, and audience, thus bringing us closer to my project’s aim of illuminating the elusive redactor ʿĀrif ʿAlī’s emotional community.

The paper, to be read in advance, is available on a protected post on our website, with the password “mirror.”