11/1 Jue Hou @ APEA

Jue Hou

PhD Student, Committee on Social Thought

“The Cybernetic Writing Pad: Computer Science and Chinese Script Reforms”

Friday, November 1st, 3-5 p.m.

Location: Center for East Asian Studies 319 (1155 E. 60th St.) 

Discussant: Yueling Ji (PhD Student, EALC)

Next Friday from 3-5pm, the Art and Politics of East Asia (APEA) workshop is proud to host Jue Hou (PhD Student, Committee on Social Thought), who will present his paper “The Cybernetic Writing Pad: Computer Science and Chinese Script Reforms.” He summarizes the paper as follows:

In an era where the experience of Chinese writing is lived through such technologies as the Sogou cloud input, word prediction, and abundant choices of artistic fonts, Chinese scripts seems to have attained harmony with the world of machines. Yet as recently as the late 1970s and early 1980s, when all this was yet unforeseen, the Chinese character faced an impending doom of being abolished against the backdrop of the reopening of conversations on script reform previously interrupted by the Cultural Revolution and the various new demands instigated by technological advancements—the latest of the many crises in the troubled history of China’s entanglement with its script system and a century-long enterprise of national revival. This study is intended as an archaeology of how this crisis (re)emerged in the late 1970s and culminated in the first few years of the 1980s, how the old ideology of phonocentrism and the new wave of computer science informed and contested with each other, and how the series of dialogues between script reformists and engineers renegotiated the understanding of writing at the dawn of the Information Age. In particular, I seek to show that, following a shift from an ideologically informed anti-illiteracy movement to a scientifically driven campaign toward establishing new human-machine interfaces, ci [word] took over zi [character] as the major concern of scriptal modernization, during which the computer emerged as an actant that demands a retheorization of writing. I argue that, while the series of debates over scriptal modernization in this period were carried out in the familiar vocabulary of phonocentrism, Chinese scripts’ encounter with computer science in effect gave rise to a new ideology, characterized by what I shall call “phoneticization without phonè.”

Thursday, 10/24: Yuqian Yan @ APEA

Yuqian Yan

(Postdoctoral Fellow in Chinese Performance Cultures, Washington University in St. Louis)

A Two-Way Mirror: Set Design and Social Reflection in Shanghai Cinema, 1937-1941

12:30-2:00pm, Wieboldt 301N (EALC Seminar Room)

*Please note the special date and location*

On October 24th from 12:30pm to 2:00pm the Art and Politics of East Asia workshop will host Yiqian Yan (Postdoctoral Fellow in Chinese Performance Cultures, Washington University in St. Louis). She will deliver a mock talk on “A Two-Way Mirror: Set Design and Social Reflection in Shanghai Cinema, 1937-1941.” Yuqian provides the following abstract:
Despite the rapid recovery of the Shanghai film industry after the Battle of Shanghai, one thing that filmmakers hardly recuperated during the Orphan Island period was the practice of location shooting due to the conditions of the war. Film companies almost relied completely on studio sets for production and set designers were increasingly compared to magicians who created the illusion of infinite worlds out of confined studio space. This talk examines how varied strategies of spatial configurations in Orphan Island cinema conditioned the viewers’ experience of the diegetic world and their reflections on social reality. Using the “two-way mirror” model to complicate the meaning of contemporary relevance, the talk demonstrates the critical role of set design in determining the reflective quality of a film text.
There is no pre-circulated paper for this talk. Refreshments will be served at the workshop. We look forward to seeing you there!

Best regards,
Sabine Schulz and Jiayi Chen
Co-coordinators, Art and Politics of East Asia Workshop

Thursday, 10/10 Professor Chun-bin Chen @ APEA & EthNoise

Please join us for the first APEA workshop of the academic year for a special workshop jointly hosted with EthNoise.

Chun-Bin Chen (Associate Professor, Taipei National University of the Arts)

Highway Nine Musical Stories:

Musicking of Taiwanese Aborigines at Home and in the National Concert Hall


 

Please note the special time and location of this workshop, Thursday, October 10th 5:00-6:20pm in Rosenwald 301.

Abstract

Taking “On the Road,” a musical theater production of Taiwan’s National Theater and Concert Hall as an example, this paper deals with musical modernity of Taiwanese Aborigines. Premiered in 2010, “On the Road” was a collaboration between Taiwan National Symphony Orchestra and Puyuma Aboriginal musicians from Nanwang Village. Located on the southeast coast of Taiwan, this village is connected with the National Concert Hall by Highway Nine, at a distance of about 230 miles. Beneath the simple plot of the musical about how a Han-Taiwanese musician brought the Aboriginal musicians to perform at the Hall, there seems to be another story being narrated through the performance of the songs. This hidden story is an Aboriginal musical story spanning the time from the period of Japanese colonial rule (1895-1945) to recent years when Aboriginal musicians have achieved recognition in Taiwan’s music industry. By examining how the songs were composed and how they were performed at the both ends of Highway Nine, I aim to trace trajectories of contemporary Puyuma Aboriginal music. The trajectories indicate impacts of the Japanese school song education, assimilation policies of Japanese and Chinese governments, and the Modern Folksong Movement. The Aborigines’ musicking, however, demonstrates a form of aboriginality celebrating family values and indigenous identity as a response to the musical modernity related to the settler impacts. This study thus may help us understand how socio-cultural interactions between the Aborigines and settlers shape contemporary Aboriginal music and how the Aborigines create, convey and perceive its meanings through musicking.

 

There is no pre-circulated material for this workshop.

Refreshments and catering by Shinju Sushi will be served at the workshop. We look forward to seeing you there!

 

Jiayi Chen and Sabine Schulz

Coordinators, Art and Politics of East Asia Workshop

 

Art and Politics of East Asia is a long-standing workshop that provides a unique space for graduate students working on the cultural production in China, Korea, and Japan. Our workshop brings together students from a wide range of disciplines, including East Asian studies, comparative literature, cinema and media studies, history, art history, and anthropology. We provide a collaborative space for attending to specific methodological and theoretical problems posed by the study of East Asian texts, media, and performances. At the same time, we continue to examine the pressing issue of what it means to study East Asian artistic forms and media beyond the boundaries of national cultural histories. To these ends, we hold meetings in which graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, and outside faculty are able to present and discuss their academic work. We also hold round-table discussions on issues of particular interest to graduate students studying East Asia.

For questions related to accessibility or accommodations for those who may need assistance in order to participate, please contact jiayic@uchicago.edu and sabines@uchicago.edu.

2019 Fall Quarter Schedule

The Arts and Politics of East Asia Workshop (APEA) is pleased to announce the Fall 2019 schedule. Unless otherwise noted, the workshop meets alternate Fridays from 3:00-5:00pm in Room 319 at the Center for East Asian Studies (CEAS) in the Harris School building (1155 E 60th St).

 

10/10/19 (Thursday) – Chen Chun-bin, Assistant Professor, Taipei National University of the Arts

Co-hosted with EthNoise!

“Highway Nine Musical Stories: Musicking of Taiwanese Aborigines at Home and in the National Concert Hall”

*Please note the special date and location*

Location and time:  Rosenwald 301 – 5:00-6:20pm

 

10/24/19 (Thursday) – Yuqian Yan, Postdoctoral Fellow, Washington University in St. Louis

Mock Job Talk: “A Two-Way Mirror: Set Design and Social Reflection in Shanghai Cinema, 1937-1941

*Please note the special date and location*

Location and time:  Wieboldt 301N (EALC Seminar Room) – 12:30-2:00pm

 

10/25/19 (Friday) – Peter Chen, Masters Program in the Humanities

Co-hosted with Visual and Material Perspectives on East Asia (VMPEA)

“Feng Zikai artwork in the PRC and Taiwan”

Discussant: Minori Egashira, PhD Student, Art History

*Please note the special date and location*

Location and time:  Cochrane-Woods Arts Center (CWAC) 156 – 4:30-6:30pm

 

11/1/19 (Friday) – Jue Hou, PhD Student, Committee on Social Thought

“The Cybernetic Writing Pad: Computer Science and Chinese Script Reforms”

Discussant: Yueling Ji, PhD Student, EALC

Location and time:  Center for East Asian Studies 319 (Harris) – 3:00-5:00pm

 

11/8/19 (Friday) – Yueling Ji, PhD Student, EALC

The Piano in a Factory and Socialist Theories of Form”

Discussant: Anthony Stott, PhD Student, Comparative Literature

Special time for lunch and screening:

With a screening of The Piano in a Factory (钢的琴) and catered lunch at Center for East Asian Studies 319 (Harris), starting at 1 PM and a discussion after the screening

 

11/22/19 (Friday) – CANCELLED
Jae-Yon Lee, Assistant Professor, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology

“A Series of Repetitions: The 1920s Magazines and the Formation of Collective Authorship in Korea”

Location and time:  Center for East Asian Studies 319 (Harris) – 3:00-5:00pm

 

For further information, please consult the APEA website. Please contact both Jiayi Chen (jiayic@uchicago.edu) and Sabine Schulz (sabines@uchicago.edu) via email should you have any questions or need any assistance.

 

We are excited for our events this quarter and we hope you can attend!

Jiayi Chen and Sabine Schulz

APEA Graduate Student Coordinators, 2019-2020