Spring 2019 Schedule

Art and Politics of East Asia Workshop (APEA) is excited to announce the Spring 2019 schedule.

 

Location: Center for East Asian Studies, Room 319, 1155 E 60th St

Time: Friday, 3-5PM

Please note special location or time for some events.

 

April 12

Chenxin Jiang (PhD Candidate, Social Thought)

Philhellenism and Philosophy in 1920s China

Discussant: Yanxiao He (PhD Student, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)

Followed by a catered dinner

 

April 19

Professionalization Workshop with EALC Alumni Anne Rebull and Carly Buxton

Please note special time and location: 12-2pm in Cobb 302

 

April 26-27

Panel on East Asian Literary Histories
With PhD students Emily Yoon, Nicholas Wong, and Brian White
Discussant: Professor Paola Iovene (EALC)
Please note special time and location: Walker Museum 302, 1115 E. 58th St, Chicago, IL 60637; coffee and light refreshments at 3:30PM and panel at 4PM.

 

May 10

Yiren Zheng (PhD Candidate, EALC)

Voices that Are Not Fully Human

Discussant: William Carroll (PhD Candidate, EALC)

Please note special location: EALC Seminar Room, Wieboldt Hall 301N, followed by a catered dinner

 

May 17

Alia Breitwieser (PhD Candidate, Comparative Literature)

The Topography of the Text: Rethinking Jin Shengtan’s Reading Methods (dufa 讀法)

Discussant: Yiying Pan (PhD Candidate, EALC)

 

May 24

Jun Hee Lee (PhD Candidate, History)

Kindling Healthful Singing Across Tokyo: Utagoe Cafe Tomoshibi’s Cultural Ventures, 1962-1984

Pedagogy Roundtable: Syllabi Workshop

Sohye Kim, PhD Candidate in EALC; David Krolikoski, PhD Candidate in EALC; Kyle Peters, PhD Candidate in EALC; Yiren Zheng, PhD Candidate in EALC
Pedagogy Roundtable: Syllabi Workshop
Friday, May 18th, 3:00pm-5:00pm in Wieboldt 301N

Please join us Friday (5/18) from 3:00pm-5:00pm as we host a pedagogy roundtable of PhD Candidates from the East Asian Languages and Civilizations department. Roundtable participants will submit drafts of syllabi for the workshop’s consideration, and the following discussion will provide opportunity for workshop participants not only to give feedback on the particular syllabi drafts that have been circulated, but also to consider issues of creating East Asia-related syllabi for undergraduates: balancing area studies and discipline, managing the constraints and benefits of the quarter system, and transforming one’s own expertise and research into teaching material.

The syllabi are available directly below, or at this link. If you have not received the password, or have questions about accessibility, please feel free to contact Helina Mazza-Hilway (mazzah@uchicago.edu) or Susan Su (susansu@uchicago.edu).

Sung Hyun Kang

Sung Hyun Kang is an Assistant Professor at the Department of International Cultural Studies & Institute for East Asian Studies, SungKongHoe University (Seoul).

Sung Hyun Kang, Assistant Professor at SungKongHoe University
“Transnational Archives: Cold War, Postcolonialism, and Korean Studies”
Friday, February 23rd, 3-5pm in CEAS 319
Interpreter: Sandra Park (PhD Student, History)
Sponsored with the East Asia Transregional Histories Workshop and the Committee on Korean Studies

Please join us Friday (2/23) as we host Professor Sung Hyun Kang. Professor Kang will discuss two papers: an article draft on the topic of Korean ‘comfort women’ photography, as well as a reflection on his experiences engaging in archival research for the article. This workshop will be of significance to both to those who are interested in questions of photography, moving images, and comfort women; and also in the practical concerns of conducting archival research regarding images, both still and in motion.

Professor Kang’s article draft focuses on the still and motion pictures of Japanese military ‘comfort women’ captured by army photographers attached to the U.S. Army 164th Signal Photo Corps in China, Burma, and India during World War II. With attention to related documents and testimonies of “comfort women”, Kang analyzes the viewpoint of the photographers, as well as the intent and nature of the army photographers’ activities. Moreover, this paper uncovers the stories of individual Korean ‘comfort women’ who appear as the subjects in these still and motion pictures.

The papers are available directly below, or at this link. If you have not received the password, or have questions about accessibility, please feel free to contact Helina Mazza-Hilway (mazzah@uchicago.edu) or Susan Su (susansu@uchicago.edu).

This event is sponsored by the Committee on Korean Studies at the University of Chicago Center for East Asian Studies with support from a Title VI National Resource Center Grant from the United States Department of Education.

Sandra Park

US Army Chaplain George Burrey shaking hands with ROK Army Chaplain, 1953

Sandra Park (PhD Student, History)
“Crusading for the Twentieth Century: Christianity, Chaplaincy and Militarism in Cold War South Korea, 1945-1973”
Friday, January 26th, 3-5pm in CEAS 319
Discussant: Jun-Hee Lee (PhD Candidate, History)
Co-sponsored with the East Asia Transregional Histories Workshop

Please join us Friday (1/26) from 3-5pm, as we host Sandra Park. She will present a draft of her dissertation proposal, which she summarizes as follows:

My anticipated dissertation, “Crusading for the Twentieth Century: Christianity, Chaplaincy and Militarism in Cold War South Korea, 1945-1973,” elucidates the origins of Christianity’s increasing social and political influence from the Korean War (1950-1953) through 1973, when the Billy Graham Seoul Crusade attracted over three million people (the largest gathering in global Church history). Two decades before the Seoul Crusade, Graham visited American GIs and Korean Christians during the Korean War in 1952. At the time, wŏllam (those who went south) Korean Christian leaders like Han Kyung-Chik (who interpreted for Graham) and Hwang Ŭn-gyun articulated the conflict with communism in North Korea in eschatological language, invoking the imagery of medieval European crusades. My proposal engages the trope of “crusades” articulated during the Korean Cold War as reflective of the ways in which Christianity and militarism were folded into each other. At this stage, I expect to trace three currents that were formative to the relationship between Christianity and militarized politics in Cold War South Korea: the discursive, transpacific politics of Billy Graham and Han Kyung-Chik (1945-1950), the institutional history of the Republic of Korea (ROK) military chaplaincy from its inception in 1951, and the hegemonic culture of militarism and dissent.

The paper is available directly below, or at this link. If you have not received the password, or have questions about accessibility, please feel free to contact Helina Mazza-Hilway (mazzah@uchicago.edu) or Susan Su (susansu@uchicago.edu).

Winter Quarter 2018 Calendar

Songhua River Series: Snow Covered Songhua River (partial). Bai Hai (2010). Ink on rice paper.

1/19  Brian White, PhD Candidate in EALC
Asian Aliens: Race in 1960s Japanese Speculative Fiction”
Time & location: 3-5pm in CEAS 319
Co-sponsored with the Mass Culture Workshop

1/26   Sandra Park, PhD Student in History
“Crusading for the Twentieth Century: Christianity, Politics and the Cold War in South Korea and Korean-U.S. Relations, 1945-1973”
Time & location: 3-5pm in CEAS 319
Co-sponsored with the East Asia Trans-regional Histories Workshop

2/9    Alex Murphy, PhD Student in EALC
“The Era of the Voice: Performance, Technology, and Politics in Japan, 1918-1942”
Time & location: 3-5pm in CEAS 319

2/23   Sung Hyun Kang Assistant Professor at Sung Kong Hoe University
“Transnational Archives: Cold War, Postcolonialism, and Korean Studies”
Time & location: 3-5pm in CEAS 319
Co-sponsored with the East Asia Transregional Histories Workshop
This event is sponsored by the Committee on Korean Studies at the University of Chicago Center for East Asian Studies with support from a Title VI National Resource Center Grant from the United States Department of Education.

2/27   Yoon Sun Yang, Assistant Professor of Korean & Comparative Literature at Boston University
Lunch with graduate students
Time & location: 12pm-1pm in CEAS 319
This event is sponsored by the Committee on Korean Studies at the Center for East Asian Studies.

3/5     Paride Stortini, PhD Student in Divinity
“Imagining a Cosmopolitan “Furusato”: India and Buddhism in the Silk Road Imaginaire of Hirayama Ikuo”
Time & location: Noon-1:15pm in Swift Hall
Co-sponsored with the Religion and Human Sciences Workshop

Fall Quarter 2017 Calendar

Flowering Cherry and Autumn Maples with Poem Slips. Tosa Mitsuoki (c. 1617-1691) on a six-panel screen; ink, color, gold, and silver on silk.

10/6    Will Carroll, PhD Candidate in Cinema and Media Studies and EALC
“I don’t masturbate; I fight!”: The Specter of Kita Ikki in Suzuki Seijun’s Fighting Elegy
Time & location: 3:30pm in Wieboldt 301N

10/20   Matthew Lowenstein, PhD Student in History
“An American Banker in Shanghai: Frank J. Raven in Historiographical Perspective”
Time & location: 3pm in Wieboldt 301N

10/27   Reiko Abe Auestad, Professor, Department of Culture Studies and Oriental Languages, University of Oslo
“Tsushima Yūko (1947-2016): Calling Upon the Dead”
Time & location: 3pm in CEAS 319

11/3     Nicholas Wong, PhD Candidate in Comparative Literature
“Literary Collectives and “Minor” Time in Late 1950s Mahua Autobiographical Fiction and Reportage”
Time & location: 3pm in CEAS 319

11/10    Yuqian Yan, PhD Candidate in Cinema and Media Studies and EALC
“Embodying the Ancient: The Body and its Costume”
Time & location: 3pm in CEAS 319
Co-hosted with the Mass Culture Workshop

11/17    Sohye Kim, PhD Candidate in EALC
“Zhang Lu’s Landing in South Korea: The Fashioning of Spectatorship in a Globalizing and ‘Multicultural’ Society” (working title)
Time & location: 3pm in CEAS 319

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