Spring Quarter 2018 Calendar

Cho Boo-soo, 수련 (Water lily), 116.8×91cm, Acrylic on Canvas, 2010.

3/30   Yujie Li, PhD Student in History
“Birth of the Phoenix Bicycle: Standardization and Socialist Firm Formation in the Early PRC”
Time & location: 3:00-5:00pm in CEAS 319

4/13   Hoyt Long, Associate Professor of Japanese Literature in EALC
“A History of Distant Reading in Japan”
Time & location: 3:00-5:00pm in CEAS 319

5/1   Corey Byrnes, Assistant Professor of Modern Chinese Literature at Northwestern University
Defining the Chinese Landscape of Desolation in Teaching and Research
Time & location: 5:00pm-7:00pm in Cochrane-Woods Art Center 152
Co-sponsored with the Visual and Material Perspectives on East Asia Workshop

5/18   Sohye Kim, PhD Candidate in EALC; David Krolikoski, PhD Candidate in EALC; Kyle Peters, PhD Candidate in EALC; Yiren Zheng, PhD Candidate in EALC
Pedagogy Roundtable: Syllabi Workshop
Time & location: 3:00-5:00pm in Wieboldt 301N

6/1   Jun Hee Lee, PhD Candidate in History 
Let the People Sing: Politico-Musical Ideas and Practices in the Early Utagoe Movement, 1948-1955″
Time & location: 3:00-5:00pm in CEAS 319

Paride Stortini

Hirayama Ikuo, “Ancestral Buddhism,” 1959. Saku Municipal Museum Modern Art Collection.

Paride Stortini (PhD Student, Divinity)
“Imagining a Cosmopolitan “Furusato”: India and Buddhism in the Silk Road Imaginaire of Hirayama Ikuo”
Monday, March 5th, 12:00pm-1:15pm in Swift Hall’s Marty Center Library
Discussant: Sandy Lin (PhD Student in Art History)
Co-sponsored with the Religion and the Human Sciences Workshop

Please join us Monday (3/5) from 12:00pm-1:15pm as we host Paride Stortini (PhD Student in Divinity). He will present a draft of his qualifying exams paper in progress, which he summarizes as follows:

This paper is on a topic that is not directly linked to my dissertation research and will not be included in my dissertation, which will be focused on India in Meiji Japan. Nevertheless, many of the theoretical references, as well as the general issue of Buddhism and pan-Asianism, will certainly end up in my dissertation. In addition, I plan to present the last section of the paper at a conference in Delhi at the end of March on “India in the Silk Road,” and plan to keep this material for future research projects and single article publication. In this paper I am working on a chronological period (post-WWII Japan) with which I am less familiar than the Meiji period, and I use a lot of art, with which I am definitely not familiar, that is why any suggestion from colleagues with more expertise will be greatly appreciated.
The paper is available directly below, or at this link. If you have not received the password, or have questions about accessibility, please feel free to contact Helina Mazza-Hilway (mazzah@uchicago.edu) or Susan Su (susansu@uchicago.edu).

 

Sung Hyun Kang

Sung Hyun Kang is an Assistant Professor at the Department of International Cultural Studies & Institute for East Asian Studies, SungKongHoe University (Seoul).

Sung Hyun Kang, Assistant Professor at SungKongHoe University
“Transnational Archives: Cold War, Postcolonialism, and Korean Studies”
Friday, February 23rd, 3-5pm in CEAS 319
Interpreter: Sandra Park (PhD Student, History)
Sponsored with the East Asia Transregional Histories Workshop and the Committee on Korean Studies

Please join us Friday (2/23) as we host Professor Sung Hyun Kang. Professor Kang will discuss two papers: an article draft on the topic of Korean ‘comfort women’ photography, as well as a reflection on his experiences engaging in archival research for the article. This workshop will be of significance to both to those who are interested in questions of photography, moving images, and comfort women; and also in the practical concerns of conducting archival research regarding images, both still and in motion.

Professor Kang’s article draft focuses on the still and motion pictures of Japanese military ‘comfort women’ captured by army photographers attached to the U.S. Army 164th Signal Photo Corps in China, Burma, and India during World War II. With attention to related documents and testimonies of “comfort women”, Kang analyzes the viewpoint of the photographers, as well as the intent and nature of the army photographers’ activities. Moreover, this paper uncovers the stories of individual Korean ‘comfort women’ who appear as the subjects in these still and motion pictures.

The papers are available directly below, or at this link. If you have not received the password, or have questions about accessibility, please feel free to contact Helina Mazza-Hilway (mazzah@uchicago.edu) or Susan Su (susansu@uchicago.edu).

This event is sponsored by the Committee on Korean Studies at the University of Chicago Center for East Asian Studies with support from a Title VI National Resource Center Grant from the United States Department of Education.

Alex Murphy

Clockwise from left: Fumiko Kawabata, Eiga no Tomo (July 1938), flyer for Zenkoku Nomin Sogo Taikai (April 1935), in-studio session for JOAK program ‘santo no bunka wo kataru (1933), promotional image for NHK Tokyo station JOAK.

Alex Murphy (PhD Student, EALC)
“The Era of the Voice: Performance, Technology, and Politics in Japan, 1918-1942”
Wednesday, February 14th, 4:30-6:30pm in CEAS 319
Discussant: Nicholas Lambrecht (PhD Candidate, EALC)

Please join us Wednesday (2/14) from 4:30-6:30pm as we host Alex Murphy (PhD Student in EALC). He will present a draft of his dissertation proposal, which he summarizes as follows:

The 1920s and 30s in Japan witnessed a striking degree of attention converge on the voice in poetry, theater, and popular music. Alert to recent advances in radio, commercial recording, and sound film, artists, intellectuals, and activists sought to reckon with the human voice both as an increasingly powerful medium of public self-expression as well as a material and aesthetic object of mediation itself. For poets and musicians in turn, sound technology seemed at once to enliven new modes of vocal expression while ironically threatening the very sense of immediacy and authorial presence that drew many to the voice in the first place. At the same time, the transit of voices and bodies on records and radio waves across the Pacific and throughout Japan’s heterogeneous empire invited unruly expressions of subjectivity across audible markers of race, gender, and culture. By addressing this historical moment as an ‘era of the voice,’ then, my dissertation project explores how these discursive and technological currents manifested in embodied vocal practice, and how an attunement to these sounds might help to rethink the culture and politics of interwar Japan.

The paper is available directly below, or at this link. If you have not received the password, or have questions about accessibility, please feel free to contact Helina Mazza-Hilway (mazzah@uchicago.edu) or Susan Su (susansu@uchicago.edu).

Sandra Park

US Army Chaplain George Burrey shaking hands with ROK Army Chaplain, 1953

Sandra Park (PhD Student, History)
“Crusading for the Twentieth Century: Christianity, Chaplaincy and Militarism in Cold War South Korea, 1945-1973”
Friday, January 26th, 3-5pm in CEAS 319
Discussant: Jun-Hee Lee (PhD Candidate, History)
Co-sponsored with the East Asia Transregional Histories Workshop

Please join us Friday (1/26) from 3-5pm, as we host Sandra Park. She will present a draft of her dissertation proposal, which she summarizes as follows:

My anticipated dissertation, “Crusading for the Twentieth Century: Christianity, Chaplaincy and Militarism in Cold War South Korea, 1945-1973,” elucidates the origins of Christianity’s increasing social and political influence from the Korean War (1950-1953) through 1973, when the Billy Graham Seoul Crusade attracted over three million people (the largest gathering in global Church history). Two decades before the Seoul Crusade, Graham visited American GIs and Korean Christians during the Korean War in 1952. At the time, wŏllam (those who went south) Korean Christian leaders like Han Kyung-Chik (who interpreted for Graham) and Hwang Ŭn-gyun articulated the conflict with communism in North Korea in eschatological language, invoking the imagery of medieval European crusades. My proposal engages the trope of “crusades” articulated during the Korean Cold War as reflective of the ways in which Christianity and militarism were folded into each other. At this stage, I expect to trace three currents that were formative to the relationship between Christianity and militarized politics in Cold War South Korea: the discursive, transpacific politics of Billy Graham and Han Kyung-Chik (1945-1950), the institutional history of the Republic of Korea (ROK) military chaplaincy from its inception in 1951, and the hegemonic culture of militarism and dissent.

The paper is available directly below, or at this link. If you have not received the password, or have questions about accessibility, please feel free to contact Helina Mazza-Hilway (mazzah@uchicago.edu) or Susan Su (susansu@uchicago.edu).

Brian White

Cover for Tsutsui Yasutaka’s 1967 short story “The Vietnam Travel Agency”

Brian White (PhD Candidate, EALC)
“Asian Aliens: Race and Ethnicity in 1960s Japanese Speculative Fiction”
Friday, January 19th, 3-5pm in CEAS 319
Discussant: Cody Jones (PhD Student, Comparative Literature & Divinity)
Co-sponsored with the Mass Culture Workshop

Please join us Friday (1/19) from 3-5pm, as we host Brian White. He will present a draft of his dissertation chapter, which he summarizes as follows:

In this partial dissertation chapter, I take up a 1968 short story by metafiction writer Tsutsui Yasutaka, entitled “Rose-Tinted Rhapsody.”  Through a close reading of this text, I discuss the significance of race and ethnicity in considerations of Cold War-era SF (speculative- or science-fiction).  This argument is an intervention in the hegemonic scholarly tradition in Japanese popular cultural studies of reading postwar texts within a bilateral system in which the United States is Japan’s only interlocutor and nuclear trauma and hyper-capitalism its only thematic concerns.  Instead, I argue for a reading of these texts that is more sensitive to the complex contemporary geopolitical situation, in which a variety of affinities were negotiated, opened up, and closed off.

The paper is available directly below, or at this link. If you have not received the password, or have questions about accessibility, please feel free to contact Helina Mazza-Hilway (mazzah@uchicago.edu) or Susan Su (susansu@uchicago.edu).