Why Democrats Must Learn the Lessons of 1889

Last week, Democrats secured their first legislative win of the year, as President Biden signed a $1.9 trillion COVID stimulus package. It was a major accomplishment, yet hardly dented the party’s to-do list. With complete control of Congress for the first time in a decade, Democrats’ have far-reaching ambitions. But with immigration, gun control, health […]

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“Making of a Historian”

I wrote this brief essay for a Historiography course. It reflects on one spectacular children’s book which helped spark my interest in history. ——— When I was about five or six, someone gave me a copy of the Smithsonian Children’s Encyclopedia of American History. It was a hefty book, with a thick cover that featured […]

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Archival Finds: US Marshals in Boston

This is the second post in my series on standout documents I encountered during my internship at the National Archives. The first post can be found here. ——— Equipment List from U.S. Marshals Deployment in Boston, 1976 National Archives, RG 527 In the fall of 1976, U.S. marshals deployed to Boston to defend school desegregation. […]

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Archival Finds: Wong King Ark

This summer, I spent 12 weeks interning with the National Archives Museum. Most of that time went toward helping to prepare an upcoming exhibit, tentatively titled Written in White, which chronicles the history of race and federal policy-making. Since the project is in its infancy, one of my central tasks was to assess what documents […]

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UChicago, Stephen Douglas, & Slavery

Yesterday, the University of Chicago announced plans to remove a bronze plaque honoring Stephen Douglas from Hutchinson Commons. Douglas, an Illinois senator, was one of the leading Americans of the mid 19th century, most famous today for his series of debates with Abraham Lincoln. In 1856, Douglas donated land in the South Side where the […]

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