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News Roundup: January 2019

News Roundup: January 2019

A selection of health news from the University of Chicago and around the globe curated just for you.

Gut bacteria protects against food allergies
New research from UChicago’s Cathryn Nagler shows that healthy infants have intestinal bacteria that prevent the development of food allergies. (Discover magazine)

Looking for links between the gut microbiome and eye disease
UChicago researcher Dimitra Skondra is studying possible connections between the gut microbiome and eye disease like age-related macular degeneration. (The Forefront)

What is ulcerative colitis and how can I treat it?
The chronic condition can be debilitating, but treatments are expanding and improving. David Rubin featured. (US News & World Report)

Our pets: The key to the obesity crisis?
Even animals that aren’t eating too much or exercising too little are getting fat. If we can figure out why, we may have the key to our own obesity crisis – and how to stop it. (BBC Future)

Antibacterial stuff is giving dust drug resistance
An antimicrobial chemical called triclosan is abundant in dust—and linked to changes in its genetic makeup, according to a new study. The result is dust with organisms that could cause an antibiotic-resistant infection. (Futurity)

 

News roundup: December 2018

News roundup: December 2018

A selection of health news from the University of Chicago and around the globe curated just for you.

UChicago researchers broaden impact by bringing scientific discoveries to market
Taking biomedical discoveries from bench to startup to bedside. Cover story for the Fall 2018 issue of Medicine on the Midway alumni magazine. (The Forefront)

Neuroscientist receives $2.32 million grant to study the role of the microbiome in Alzheimer’s disease
UChicago’s Sangram Sisodia has received a grant for $2,322,876 over three years from philanthropic foundation Good Ventures to support research on Alzheimer’s disease. (The Forefront)

To battle cancer, first understand the immune system
For years, cancer treatment has largely involved one of three options—surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. In recent years, immunotherapy has entered the playing field. Tom Gajewski featured. (Science Friday)

Immigrating to the US? Get ready for a new microbiome
Moving to the U.S. can seriously mess with immigrants’ microbiomes, according to a new study that tracked the digestive health of refugees coming to Minnesota from Southeast Asia. (NPR)

How to make software algorithms for health care fair and equal for everyone
Machine-learning algorithms help organizations analyze large amounts of data to improve decision-making. But, what happens when the data being analyzed reflects historical bias against vulnerable populations? UChicago’s Marshall Chin is working to ensure equity across all areas of the healthcare system, including data analysis. (The Forefront)

 

News roundup: November 2018

News roundup: November 2018

A selection of health news from the University of Chicago and around the globe curated just for you.

Researchers find promise in new treatment for food allergies
UChicago is part of clinical trial that doctors hope will lead to an FDA-approved medication for people with peanut allergy. Christina Ciaccio featured. (UChicago News)

Save the germs
With modern medicine killing off whole categories of bacteria and viruses—including benign ones that promote health—Jack Gilbert and colleagues propose a way to preserve microbes that may rescue us one day. (The New York Times)

How might the appendix play a key role in Parkinson’s disease?
Those who have their appendixes removed in young adulthood run a nearly 20 percent lower risk of developing the neurodegenerative disorder decades later or not at all, study finds. (Scientific American)

Polsky Center’s Innovation Fund renamed to honor George P. Shultz
The decision to rename the Innovation Fund was the result of a $10 million gift to the Fund from University trustee and Booth alumna Mary A. Tolan, MBA ’92. (Polsky Center)

Jeffrey Hubbell named to National Academy of Medicine
Research by Hubbell—who co-founded UChicago food allergy startup ClostraBio—has led to tools and treatments, including nanoparticle vaccines and drug delivery systems, that combat diseases ranging from influenza and type 1 diabetes to tuberculosis and cancer. (UChicago News)

News roundup: October 2018

News roundup: October 2018

A selection of health news from the University of Chicago and around the globe curated just for you.

Three UChicago Scientists Earn NIH Grants to Pursue Innovative Research
Three UChicago scientists—including Jun Huang, who studies the immune system and its role in treating infectious diseases and cancer—each have been awarded $1.5 million grants over five years from the National Institutes of Health in support of their innovative, high-impact biomedical research. (UChicago News)

Noah’s Ark for Microbes
A team of researchers, including Jack Gilbert, is calling for the creation of a global microbiota vault to protect the long-term health of humanity. (Science)

These 19 MassChallenge Startups Just Won $1.65M
Nineteen early-stage startups, including Oxalo Therapeutics, won a total of $1.65 million at Wednesday night’s MassChallenge awards ceremony. (BostInno)

Polsky Opens its High-Profile Accelerator to Alumni Startups
UChicago’s New Venture Challenge, ranked among the top accelerator programs in the country, is launching an alumni track as part of its annual startup competition. (American Inno)

Meet the Carousing, Harmonica-Playing Texan Who Just Won a Nobel for his Cancer Breakthrough
This year, the Nobel Prize was awarded to James Allison, PhD—a colleague, friend, and “The Checkpoints” bandmate of Tom Gajewski—for research that laid the groundwork for the development of checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapies. (WIRED)

 

News roundup: September 2018

News roundup: September 2018

A selection of health news from the University of Chicago and around the globe curated just for you.

The end of an epidemic
The number of people with food allergies has exploded in recent years. A dream team of researchers from UChicago may have figured out why, and now they’re developing therapies that could end the epidemic. Cathy Nagler featured. (Chicago magazine)

UChicago startup gets $2.3 million for kidney stone prevention
Biotechnology startup Oxalo Therapeutics is closer to developing a first-of-its-kind drug to prevent kidney stones thanks to $2.3 million from the National Institutes of Health. Hatim Hassan and Yang Zheng featured. (Crain’s Chicago Business)

Science by the sea
In three weeks, there are just over 500 hours. The students in the Marine Biological Laboratory’s September intensive courses tried to use them all. Jack Gilbert featured. (UChicago Magazine)

Nasal bacteria linked to cold severity
In a study, people with certain bacteria in their noses were more likely to develop more severe cold symptoms. (U.S. News & World Report)

Brain-gut link may be way faster than we thought
New research with mice may upend our understanding of the connection between the gut and the brain, as well as appetite. (Futurity)

 

News roundup: August 2018

News roundup: August 2018

A selection of health news from the University of Chicago and around the globe curated just for you.

UChicago awarded $1 million grant to study microbiome dynamics
Researchers from UChicago have received a $1 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation to study how the molecular activity of the microbiome changes in response to the environment. Eugene Chang and Tao Pan featured. (The Forefront)

Reliable point-of-care blood test can help prevent toxoplasmosis
A recent study, performed in Chicago and Morocco found that a novel finger-prick test can accurately predict infection with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii during pregnancy. Rima McLeod, whose broader work is reported in an earlier WellNews post, featured. (The Forefront)

‘Zombie gene’ protects against cancer—in elephants
With such enormous bodies, elephants should be particularly prone to tumors. But an ancient gene in their DNA, somehow resurrected, seems to shield the animals. Vincent Lynch featured. (New York Times)

Hospital bacteria are starting to tolerate hand sanitizer
Strains of bacteria have developed increased tolerance to the alcohols in hand sanitizers, which requires hospitals to rethink how they protect patients from drug-resistant bacteria. (Futurity)

Oxalo Therapeutics among recipients of scholarships from drug accelerator
Cydan II Inc., an orphan drug accelerator dedicated to creating therapies that impact the lives of people living with rare genetic diseases, announced it has selected four start-up organizations and companies, including Oxalo, to receive $5,000 scholarships to support innovations that impact the lives of people with rare conditions. (BusinessWire)