November 29, Victor Yuan, “Public Opinion and Public Policy in China: Insights from the Dataway Horizon”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

Public Opinion and Public Policy in China: Insights from Dataway Horizon”

Victor Yuan

Chairman

Dataway Horizon

Moderated by Prof. Dali Yang

Department of Political Science, University of Chicago

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Description

Dr. Victor Yuan leads Dataway Horizon (former Horizon Research Consultancy Group, 零点研究调查集团), one of China’s leading public opinion and polling firms. With a solid experience in data collection and analysis for more than 20 years, Victor has successfully applied socially oriented polling work to encourage policy makers to increase NGO services for homeless people, to revamp HIV/AIDS prevention programs, to assist migrant workers integrate into urban communities, and to improve human rights environments inside factories. Victor has also been leading an international effort to enhance the transparency of the Chinese government by overseeing annual assessments of public officials in China. During this event, Victor will be talking about his experience doing polls in China, as well as providing us fresh data and insights on Chinese public opinion and policies.

About Dataway Horizon

Dataway Horizon is an international organization based in China providing data intelligence service. It has carried out multiple practices in providing various services to the governments, large enterprises, start-ups, and non-governmental organizations both domestically and internationally. Also, Dataway Horizon fastens attention on innovative services and products under the Internet economy, and exhausts capabilities in data mining and analyzing merged data streams to support the clients’ strategies with respect to economic, social, cultural development and policy-making.

About the Speaker

Dr. Victor Yuan is the chairman of the board, founder, and president of Dataway Horizon, which he founded in 1992. He has had 20 years of experience in professional marketing, social research and policy analysis, and management consulting. Beyond these, Dr. Yuan serves as president of the Beijing Consulting Association, vice president for China Marketing Research Association, representative of the Association of Management Consulting Firms in China, and adjunct professor for Tsinghua, Nankai, and Southwest Jiaotong universities.

Dr. Yuan holds a Ph.D. in sociology from Peking University and an MPA from the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.

*To see the full autumn 2016 schedule: Autumn Schedule

*Questions and concerns can be addressed to the student coordinator Yinxian Zhang (zyxzhang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), xisong@chicagobooth.edu

Dali Yang (Political Science), daliyang@uchicago.edu

Dingxin Zhao (Sociology), dzhao@uchicago.edu


 

The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

November 15, Wen Xie, “The Making of the Chinese Rustbelt: Work, Welfare and Industrial Transformation in Northeast China, 1949-2015”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents 

 

The Making of the Chinese Rustbelt: Work, Welfare and Industrial Transformation in Northeast China, 1949-2015”

Wen Xie

PhD Student, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

My ongoing dissertation project examines the entanglement of historical legacies, human lives, and global/national politico-economic transformations in northeast China, the once socialist heavy industrial heartland that is now the epitome of the Chinese “rustbelt.” Existing literature focuses either on characteristics of social protests or the economic development outcome. Bridging the economic and political dimensions of the transformation, my approach centers on generational experiences as a nexus between the country’s socialist past and capitalist/neoliberal present to illuminate the complexities of how historical legacies have interacted with globalization, shifting national policy priorities and local institutions, and channeled into the present market economy and non-socialist welfare system. I place the life experience of a generation spanning Mao’s era (1949-1976), market reform (1977-1992), and the country’s neoliberal turn (1992-2015), the center of this industrial heartland’s transformation. This project draws on ethnographic observations, interviews and archival data from multiple places in the region. At the workshop, I will present my overarching theoretical framework, research design and preliminary empirical findings.

About the speaker:

Wen Xie is a 5th year PhD student in sociology. She is broadly interested in economic sociology, comparative historical sociology, regional political economy, and labor issues. A central interest driving her past and ongoing projects is politico-economic transformations and social consequences in China since 1949.

* To see the full Autumn 2016 schedule: Autumn 2016 Schedule

* Questions and concerns can be addressed to the student coordinator Yinxian Zhang (zyxzhang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), xisong@chicagobooth.edu

Dali Yang (Political Science), daliyang@uchicago.edu

Dingxin Zhao (Sociology), dzhao@uchicago.edu


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

November 1, Shilin Jia, “Organizational Identity and Metabolism: Inter-organizational Mobility of Political Elites in CCP China, 1977-2012.”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

Organizational Identity and Metabolism: Inter-organizational Mobility of Political Elites in CCP China, 1977-2012.”

Shilin Jia

PhD Student, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

How would a large and complex social organism reproduce itself while all of its members are always in flows? How could it maintain its unity with spatial and functional differentiation? Are identity and change not only always coexisting but also mutually constitutive? The co-presence of large-scale institutional realignment and political unity in the Chinese communist party state during the past 30 to 40 years poses an intriguing case for studying the classical question of how social institutions persist and evolve out of complex and often contradictory social relationships. By machine-coding the CVs of over 8000 Chinese political elites and analyzing their career flows during the period, this study reveals the changing patterns of how Chinese political elites have been transferred across different geographical and functional domains (provinces and ministries). The changing coupling and de-coupling patterns suggest some significant reorientation of “mobility as control” mechanism during the process of the party state’s institutional evolution from a centrally planned system to the multifaceted Leviathan at the current stage with coexisting centrifugal and centripetal forces represented by clear division of labor and highly frequent circular job movements.

Note: A network visualization of the study can be viewed at https://www.dropbox.com/s/4g4lmlsnb1urc6b/output_3.wmv.

About the speaker:

Shilin Jia is a 3rd year PhD student in the Department of Sociology. He is interested in applying computational methods to studying macro social-historical change and modeling large-scale stochastic social processes in continuous time. He also has a broad interest in sociological theory and quantitative methodology. In addition to the Chinese bureaucratic circulation project he has spent almost forever working on, Jia is currently also involved in a computational content analysis project, with his colleague Linzhuo Li, tracking changing economic rhetoric in 60 years of the People’s Daily.

* To see the full autumn 2016 schedule: 2016 Autumn Schedule

* Questions and concerns can be addressed to the student coordinator Yinxian Zhang (zyxzhang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), xisong@chicagobooth.edu

Dali Yang (Political Science), daliyang@uchicago.edu

Dingxin Zhao (Sociology), dzhao@uchicago.edu


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

October 18, Jia Li, “Tigers in Cage: A Network Explanation of Corruption Prosecution in China”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

Tigers in Cage: A Network Explanation of Corruption Prosecution in China”

Jia Li

CIR Student, the University of Chicago

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

Autocrats who command anticorruption agencies selectively take down elites who threaten their autocracies. The puzzle of political prosecution, however, is not only who are prosecuted but also how they are. The duration of political prosecution, as this paper argues, is determined by the rebellion capacity of prosecuted elite. Rebellion capacity of an elite derives from his brokerage position in the elite network. This paper applies network analysis to study Xi Jinping’s anticorruption campaign in China. Taking advantage of the two-stage prosecution procedure of the party-state, this paper controls the magnitude of corruption and explains intraparty duration by network positions of the 184 senior party cadres involved in corruption. The findings suggest that the more capable of rebellion a cadre is, the longer it takes to prosecute him. The autocrat intends to detect plots against his autocracy in the course of investigating corruption.

Keywords: corruption; autocracy; China; network analysis

About the speaker:

Jia Li is a second-year student in the MA program of Committee on International Relations (CIR). He is interested in authoritarian politics, especially the dynamics between its political institutions, elite networks and regime survival. Jia is working on a project that applies network analysis to explain the variation of prosecution strategies in China’s anticorruption campaign.

* To see the full autumn 2016 schedule: 2016 Autumn Schedule

* Questions and concerns can be addressed to the student coordinator Yinxian Zhang (zyxzhang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), xisong@chicagobooth.edu

Dali Yang (Political Science), daliyang@uchicago.edu

Dingxin Zhao (Sociology), dzhao@uchicago.edu


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

October 4, James Tam, “The Chinese Outbound Acquisition Spree: Trends and Implications”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

The Chinese Outbound Acquisition Spree: Trends and Implications”

James Tam

Managing Director and Co-Head of Mergers & Acquisitions

Asia Pacific at Morgan Stanley

Discussant: Prof. Lin William Cong

Booth School of Business, University of Chicago

4:30-6:00 p.m., Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Description:

2016 is the busiest year ever for Chinese outbound mergers & acquisitions (M&A), with year-to-date transaction volumes having already surpassed that of full-year 2015’s. This talk will discuss the background and drivers of the recent surge in China’s outbound M&A activity, and will attempt to address the question of whether the recent spike in transaction volumes is sustainable in the medium-long term or not.

This presentation is co-sponsored by the Committee on International Relations (CIR).

About the speaker:

James Tam joined Morgan Stanley in 1998 and has 18 years of investment banking experience. He is currently a Managing Director and Co-Head of Mergers & Acquisitions, Asia Pacific at Morgan Stanley. Mr. Tam graduated from the University of Chicago with Bachelor of Arts in Economics and Master of Arts in International Relations (CIR). Please find attached the bios of James Tam for more information: James Tam Bio 1James Tam Bio 2

*To see a full schedule of Autumn 2016: Workshop Schedule

*Questions and concerns can be addressed to Yinxian Zhang (zyxzhang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), xisong@chicagobooth.edu

Dali Yang (Political Science), daliyang@uchicago.edu

Dingxin Zhao (Sociology), dzhao@uchicago.edu


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Autumn 2016 Schedule

EAST ASIA WORKSHOP: POLITICS, ECONOMY & SOCIETY

Autumn 2016 Workshop Schedule

 

October 4

“The Chinese Outbound Acquisition Spree: Trends and Implications”

James Tam

Managing Director and Co-Head of Mergers & Acquisitions

Asia Pacific at Morgan Stanley

 

October 18

“Tigers in Cage: A Network Explanation of Corruption Prosecution in China”

Jia Li

CIR student

University of Chicago

 

November 1

“Identity and Organizational Metabolism: Elite Transfers in CCP China”

Shilin Jia

PhD student, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

 

November 15

“From Manchuria to Rustbelt: Industrial and Social Transformation in Northeast China”

Wen Xie

PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

 

November 29

“The US-China Survey” (TBD)

Victor Yuan

Chairman, Horizon Research Consultancy Group

 

East Asia Workshop meets on alternate Tuesdays 4:30-6pm at Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Avenue. This workshop features interdisciplinary scholarship addressing topics relating to social, political, economic and cultural matters in East Asia. Our presenters come from different disciplines like sociology, political science, economics, anthropology, history and so on.

*Questions and comments should be addressed to the coordinator Yinxian Zhang: zyxzhang@uchicago.edu

Faculty Sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), xisong@chicagobooth.edu

Dali Yang (Political Science), daliyang@uchicago.edu

Dingxin Zhao (Sociology), dzhao@uchicago.edu


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

May 31, Eric Hundman, “Networks and Loyalties: The Social Roots of Military Disobedience in the Sino-French War”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

 “Networks and Loyalties: The Social Roots of Military Disobedience in the Sino-French War”

Eric Hundman

PhD Candidate, Department of Political Science

The University of Chicago

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

Abstract

Obedience to authority is often thought to be paramount in military organizations, but disobedience in various forms—including desertion, foot-dragging, rebellion, compromise, negotiation, surrender, mutiny, and outright insubordination—is common. This project explores such variation by explaining how commanders respond to their orders in war, with a focus on explaining when and why well-trained, ostensibly loyal commanders disobey their superiors. I first lay out a theory of how commanders judge their orders to be inappropriate, then show how the interaction between social network brokerage and loyalty determines their ultimate responses. I substantiate this theory using case studies of two Chinese commanders engaged in the Sino-French War (1883-1885): Xu Yanxu (徐延旭) and Bao Chao (鮑超). Both of these commanders judged their orders to be inappropriate, but one obeyed and the other disobeyed. Drawing on extensive primary-source data gathered from archives in China and Taiwan between 2012-2015, I leverage a variety of personal texts—including private correspondence, internal government documents, military communiqués, media reports, and official pronouncements—to show that these commanders judged their orders and assessed their loyalties as my theory predicts. In order to evaluate these commanders’ brokerage positions, I also constructed novel egocentric network databases that allow me to model changes in these commanders’ social networks over time. I therefore offer a new theory of military disobedience rooted in both structural and purposive mechanisms. Because this project develops new data from an understudied war that China fought in the late 19th century, it also contributes to debates on the strength of the Qing state, the development of China’s military, and China’s international relations.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Yan Xu (xuyan@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Xi Song, Dali Yang and Dingxin Zhao

 

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

May 24, Le Lin, “Interstitial Emergence and The Making of Capitalism: The Thriving of Private Enterprises in China’s Education and Training Industry”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

 “Interstitial Emergence and The Making of Capitalism: The Thriving of Private Enterprises in China’s Education and Training Industry”

Le Lin

PhD Student, Department of Sociology

The University of Chicago

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

Abstract

This paper demonstrates an alternative trajectory of China’s capitalistic development to the existing economics, state-led and new institutional accounts: private economy could emerge and thrive interstitially between the state and the second economy. Drawing on China’s education and training industry (ETI) and education and training organizations (ETOs), I explore why private ETOs thrived and came to leading market status, despite that the Chinese state forbade private ownership and for-profit activities in the ETI. I show there was a particular kind of privately operated ETOs (Cowboy ETOs) that were founded by socially marginalized entrepreneurs and did not conform to the social norms new institutionalists considered as key to private economy development. Being situated in the interstitial space enabled Cowboy ETOs to draw resources and organizational repertoires from both the state and the second economy, providing these ETOs with more ambiguous identities than organizations of competing models. Cowboy ETOs not only benefited directly from their ambiguous identities, but they also gained advantages from the ambiguous regulations’ tolerating their practices. These ETOs outcompeted organizations of other ownerships and came to leading status, facilitating the diffusion of their commercial practices and making the ETI into a commercial industry led by private enterprises. I discuss the implications on state-market relations and origins and size of China’s private economy.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Yan Xu (xuyan@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Xi Song, Dali Yang and Dingxin Zhao

May 17, Xiao-bo Yuan, “Economies of Exposure: the ethics of concealment and revelation in Chinese Christianities”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

 “Economies of Exposure: the ethics of concealment and revelation in Chinese Christianities”

Xiao-bo Yuan

PhD Student, Department of Anthropology

The University of Chicago

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

Abstract

In this presentation, I draw on fieldwork conducted among Christian communities in the Nanjing metropolitan area to examine how aspirations to publicity or secrecy are expressed and contested within different (registered and unregistered) Christian communities. Through these cases, I examine how publicity and secrecy are calibrated and given value, and how assumptions about the intersections between religious belief and public life give shape to very different Christian institutional forms and practices in China. Rather than considering the above- and underground distinction to be primarily a product of state regulations and churches’ assent or resistance to government monitoring, this paper attends to the labors of Christian institutions in “opening up” and “going underground” as projects of producing specific kinds of (in)visibility. These labors are informed, I suggest, by “economies of exposure” — differentially distributed possibilities for challenging the state’s structures of legibility for religious organizations. Here, I explore the sensibilities toward publicity and secrecy, exposure and concealment, that organize the practices of Christians in China. What forms of publicity do churches aspire to, and how are they motivated to do so? How are conditions of secrecy maintained in other instances? What kinds of Christian subjects are produced through the work of revelation and concealment?

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Yan Xu (xuyan@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Xi Song, Dali Yang and Dingxin Zhao

 

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

May 3, Haifeng Huang, “Information from Abroad: Foreign Media, Selective Exposure, and Political Support in China”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

 “Information from Abroad: Foreign Media, Selective Exposure, and Political Support in China”

Haifeng Huang

Assistant Professor of Political Science

University of California, Merced

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, May 3, 2016

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract

What kind of content do citizens in a developing and authoritarian country like to acquire from Western free media? What are the effects of their potentially selective exposure? Through a novel survey experiment with 1200 Chinese Internet users from diverse sociodemographic backgrounds, we find that Chinese citizens with higher pro-Western orientations and lower regime evaluations are more inclined to read content that is positive about foreign countries and/or negative about China. More importantly, because reputable Western media’s reports are generally more balanced and realistic than overly rosy information about foreign countries that popularly circulates in China, reading positive (but realistic) foreign media content about foreign countries improves rather than worsens the domestic evaluations of citizens who self-select such content. Consequently, foreign media may enhance regime stability in an authoritarian country by making regime critics less critical (censorship of foreign media, on the other hand, may backfire). Along the way the article also introduces an innovative experimental procedure that integrates self-selection and random assignment of treatments in a way useful for studies of information effects.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Yan Xu (xuyan@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Xi Song, Dali Yang and Dingxin Zhao

 

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.