May 30, In Hyee Hwang, “Perceived Threat and Welfare Distribution in Rural China”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents
 

 Perceived Threat and Welfare Distribution in Rural China”

 
In Hyee Hwang
PhD candidate, Department of Political Science
University of Chicago
 
4:30-6:00 p.m., Tuesday, May 30, 2017
Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.
*Light refreshments will be served*
Abstract
During the past decade, China has experienced an expansion of social welfare benefits in the absence of political reform. However, despite the rapid development of social welfare policies, access to such welfare benefits still vary widely between, as well as within provinces in China. What explains this disparity in the provision of welfare benefits? Who receives benefits to welfare, when, and how in China? 
Existing theories on welfare state development have focused on the effects of industrialism, democratization, class struggle, and varieties of capitalism. However, I argue that the Chinese Communist Party has implemented specific social policies against perceived threats in order to secure regime stability and survival. I test this argument by using 2008 individual-level survey data on land expropriation and in-depth interviews of local officials, village cadres, land developers, and villagers. I find that the expansion of rural pension benefits is closely associated with the local governments’ perception of threat to social stability. In close-knit rural areas with high levels of interpersonal exchange, the perception of threat depends on the target of the collective action more than its magnitude; to whom public demands were made affects perceptions of threat more than the number of participants involved in collective claim-making. Individuals in communities with a history of collective incidents are also more likely to receive pension benefits. 
About the Speaker
In Hyee Hwang is a PhD Candidate in the Political Science Department at the University of Chicago. Her research interests focus on welfare state development, authoritarian redistribution, and comparative studies on East Asian Politics.
*To learn more about the workshop and see the full Spring 2017 schedule, please visit: Spring Schedule
Faculty sponsors:
Xi Song (Sociology),  Dali Yang (Political Science),  and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)

The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

May 16, Di Zhou, “How Chinese new immigrants become Trump supporters? Revisiting theories of political resocialization in the context of 2016 Presidential Election on Zhihu (the “Chinese Quora”)”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

 How Chinese new immigrants become Trump supporters?  

Revisiting theories of political resocialization in the context of 2016 Presidential Election on Zhihu (the “Chinese Quora”)

 

Di Zhou

MAPSS student, Social Science Division

University of Chicago

4:30-6:00 p.m., Tuesday, March 16, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

How do first-generation immigrants and migrants adapt to a new political environment, learn to form political ideas, and participate in politics? How could a group of new immigrants and migrants become passionate Trump supporters despite Trump’s blatant anti-immigration messages? Answers to these questions require a revisit to current scholarship on political resocialization for new immigrants. The case in spotlight, the Chinese Trump supporters in the U.S., is a vivid example of how prior political knowledge can interact with exposures to both the U.S. mainstream media and an ethnic social network – Zhihu (the “Chinese Quora”). In this thesis project, I interviewed Trump supporters (and those debated with them) who are foreign-born Chinese immigrants (now U.S. citizens or green card holders) and migrants (with working or student visas). Their recent relocation from China to the U.S. and their active political expression during the 2016 general election provides a great chance to study the interactive effect between one’s prior political knowledge and their exposure to different information sources as they are embedded in multiple physical and virtual social networks.

In the workshop, I will engage with studies on new immigrants in the U.S., theories of political resocialization and studies on political communication, and present preliminary findings on 32 interviews with Chinese new immigrants and migrants who were involved in the online debate about the 2016 Presidential Election on Zhihu.

About the Speaker

Di Zhou is a MAPSS student concentrated in Sociology at the University of Chicago. She is interested in political sociology, political socialization and digital communication.

*To see the full Spring 2017 schedule, please visit: Spring schedule

 

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), Dali Yang (Political Science), and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

 

May 2, Elena Obukhova, “Switching sides: Market transition and job-referring in China”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

 “Switching sides: Market transition and job-referring in China”

 

Elena Obukhova

Assistant Professor, Desautels Faculty of Management

McGill University

4:30-6:00 p.m., Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

The existing research on referrers, or those who pass of information about job opportunities to potential job-seekers, poses an important question: when do referrers refer in the interests of their employer (the demand side) as opposed to the interests of their family and friends (the supply side)?  To answer this question we examine how market development shapes job-referring behavior.  Using a large-scale nationally representative dataset with a unique module on job-referring behavior, we show that the transition from a planned to a market economy in China is associated with a decline in job-referring in the interests of family and friends.  Additional analyses reveal that the development of formal labor market intermediaries that act as substitutes for job-referrals is one mechanism that accounts for this decline.  Our results have implications for our understanding of a) conflicting roles of job-referrers and b) labor market networks in transition economies.

About the Speaker

Elena Obukhova is an Assistant Professor in Strategy and Organization at the Desautels Faculty of Management of McGill University. Her research investigates when and how social networks benefit individuals and organizations, with a particular focus on China. Her studies tackle these questions by developing unique datasets primarily through the use of survey methods. Professor Obukhova was trained as an economic sociologist at the University of Chicago. Her work has appeared in American Journal of Sociology, Management Science, Social Forces, and other journals. She is a recipient of Fullbright-Hays Fellowship from the U.S. Department of Education and two Fellowships from the Social Science Research Council. A native of Russia, Professor Obukhova is professionally fluent in Mandarin and has been conducting research in China since 1995. At McGill, she is a co-organizer of Social Networks Working Group.

* To learn more about the workshop and see the full Spring 2017 schedule, please visit: Spring Schedule

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), Dali Yang(Political Science) and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

 

April 25, Ian Johnson, “The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

in partnership with The Seminary Co-op Bookstores

 “The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao”

Ian Johnson

Pulitzer-Prize Winning Writer

Accredited China correspondent for The New York Times

6:00-7:30 p.m., Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Seminary Co-op Bookstore, 5751 S. Woodlawn Ave.

About the Book

The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao (Pantheon/Knopf in the US and Penguin in the UK, both on April 11, 2017) tells the story of one of the world’s great spiritual revivals. Following a century of violent anti-religious campaigns, China is now filled with new temples, churches and mosques–as well as cults, sects and politicians trying to harness religion for their own ends. Driving this explosion of faith is uncertainty–over what it means to be Chinese, and how to live an ethical life in a country that discarded traditional morality a century ago and is still searching for new guideposts.

About the Author

Ian Johnson is a Pulitzer-Prize winning writer focusing on society, religion, and history. He works out of Beijing and Berlin, where he also teaches and advises academic journals and think tanks.

* To see the full Spring 2017 schedule, please visit: Spring Schedule

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology),  Dali Yang (Political Science),  and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

 

April 18, Li Dong, “Paths to Professionalization: Medical and legal experts in early twentieth-century China.”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 Paths to Professionalization: Medical and legal experts in early twentieth-century China.”

Li Dong

PhD student, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

4:30-6:00 p.m., Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

During this workshop session, I will be discussing my dissertation project. It is a comparative study of the emergence of two modern professions, law and medicine, in late Qing and early Republican China. As my work attempts to identify and explain the causes for two distinct models of professionalization in a late-developing context, it will touch upon issues such as the rise of university education in China, the early waves of Chinese students studying abroad, the first Chinese professional associations, the efforts towards state building in law and healthcare, and the various forms of professional competition.

About the Speakers

Li Dong is a 5th year PhD student in the Department of Sociology at University of Chicago. He is interested in sociology of professions and organizational studies, among others.

* To see the full Spring 2017 schedule, please visit: Spring Schedule

 

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology),  Dali Yang (Political Science),  and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

 

April 11, Jianxiong Ge, “Chinese Culture: Its characteristics and historical backgrounds”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 “Chinese Culture: Its characteristics and historical backgrounds” (in Chinese)

中国文化的历史地理基础

Jianxiong Ge (葛剑雄)

Professor, Institute of Chinese Historical Geography

Fudan University

4:30-6:00 p.m., Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Introduction

The distinguished Chinese scholar Jianxiong Ge will be visiting the University of Chicago and giving a talk at the East Asia Workshop about China’s historical and cultural changes of the longue durée. This talk will provide the audience with a grasp of the Chinese culture from the perspective of time and space. Please note that the presentation will be given in Chinese.

About the Speaker

Professor Jianxiong Ge is a senior professor of Fudan University who is specializing in Chinese history, population and migration history, and cultural history. He is also the author of Population History of China, History of Migration in China, Unification, and Separation: Perspective of Chinese History and other academic works. Professor Ge holds a Ph.D. degree from Fudan University.

*To see the full Spring 2017 schedule, please visit: Spring 2017

 

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), Dali Yang (Political Science), and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

April 4, Shilin Jia and Linzhuo Li, “New Wine in Old Bottles: Ideological Creation of Market in China’s People’s Daily, 1946-2003”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

 New Wine in Old Bottles: Ideological Creation of Market in China’s People’s Daily, 1946-2003”

 

Shilin Jia and Linzhuo Li

PhD students, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

4:30-6:00 p.m., Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

How could a new ideological regime be established upon and finally substitutes lasting old ideas, institutions, and culture that tend to have strong inertia to persist? For example, one of the most surprising transformations in the 20th century was China’s embrace of market economy under the leadership of a communist party. Such long-term ideological transformations haven’t been analyzed in a systematic way. In this study, we attempt to answer how these transformations could have happened by applying computational content analysis to the full text of the communist party’s mouthpiece, the People’s Daily, from 1946 to 2003. Various exploratory techniques were applied to analyze changing patterns in word frequencies and word embedding spaces in 58 years of newspaper articles. We found that, first, there was persistent path dependency in the party state’s ideology, especially in the economic domain. After the Cultural Revolution, except one or two historical junctures, the party state’s official rhetoric, in the grand scheme, had moved in a very smooth and linear fashion in almost all the time. Second, the transformation was initiated in the late 1970s by first utilizing some existing 1950s repertoires. Third, after some unsuccessful ’trial and error’ in the 1980s, the concept of “market economy” was finally settled down in the mid-1990s in a safe harbor under the main scheme of “socialist reform”. Our methods are useful to detect less-known historical junctures and our findings furthers a Weberian understanding that ideology and culture should be viewed as a semi-autonomous social sphere that interact with other social processes with its own logic.

In the first half of this talk, we’ll introduce the general usefulness of our data analytic techniques in getting rich information from the huge corpus of 58 years of People’s Daily articles. We’ll spend the second half discussing the main findings that are particularly pertinent to our research interest.

About the Speakers

Shilin Jia is a 3rd year PhD student in the Department of Sociology at University of Chicago. He is interested in applying computational methods to studying macro social-historical change and modeling large-scale stochastic social processes in time.

Linzhuo Li is a 3rd year PhD student in the Sociology Department at the University of Chicago. His research interests are mostly related to various kinds of “substitutions”: evolvement of local financial system, reform of credit unions in China, dynamics of online ideology groups and transformation of ideology.

*To learn more about the full Spring 2017 schedule, please visit: Spring Schedule

 

 

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology),  Dali Yang (Political Science),  and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences.

 

 

Spring 2017 Schedule

EAST ASIA WORKSHOP: POLITICS, ECONOMY & SOCIETY

Spring 2017 Workshop Schedule

April 4

“New Wine in Old Bottles: Ideological creation of market in the People’s Daily, 1946-2003”

Shinlin Jia and Linzhuo Li

PhD Students, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

 

April 11

Special China Session: “Chinese Culture: Its characteristics and historical backgrounds” (in Chinese)

Jianxiong Ge (葛剑雄)

Professor, Institute of Chinese Historical Geography

Fudan University

 

April 18

TBD

Li Dong

PhD student, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

 

April 25

Book-Reading Session: “The Souls of China: The return of religion after Mao.”

(Co-hosted with The Seminary Co-op Bookstores)

Ian Johnson

Pulitzer-Prize winning writer

Accredited China correspondent for The New York Times

 

May 2

“Switching sides: Market transition and job-referring in China.”

Elena Obukhova

Assistant Professor, Desautels Faculty of Management

McGill University

 

May 16

“Escaping the interpersonal power game: Social interaction between customers and sales agents in online shopping”

Xiaoli Tian

Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology

University of Hong Kong

May 30

“Perceived Threat and Welfare Distribution in Rural China”

In Hyee Hwang

PhD Candidate, Department of Political Science

University of Chicago

Unless otherwise stated, the East Asia Workshop meets on Every Tuesday 4:30-6 pm at Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Avenue. This workshop features interdisciplinary scholarship addressing topics relating to social, political, economic and cultural matters in East Asia. Our presenters come from different disciplines like sociology, political science, economics, history, and so on.

Faculty Sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology),  Dali Yang (Political Science),  and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences.

 

March 7, Wan-Zi Lu, “Structure or Fracture Political Loyalty: Explaining Continuity and Change of Single-Party Support”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents 

 Structure or Fracture Political Loyalty: Explaining Continuity and Change of Single-Party Support”

 

Wan-Zi Lu

PhD student, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

4:30-6:00 p.m., Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

Enduring single-party support has been asserted to weaken as traditional societies transition to modern democracy. However, this assertion fails to recognize the influence from the legacies of former regimes and intergroup relations on each community as a whole. Identifying the importance of relational factors in shaping political loyalty, recent studies argue that party identification is mobilized by community leaders. This study shows that the types of community leadership establish different experiences during democratization, processes during which single-party support appears more likely to fracture in some communities but not in others. To account for durable electoral anomaly of Taiwan’s indigenous communities, where single-party support prevails in spite of common party competition across non-aboriginal constituencies, the study assesses the relationship between the types of authority structures and the durability of single-party support. These aboriginal communities are organized by one of two possible authority structures – chief and big man, contrasted by the nature of power inheritance. Accordingly, the two structures differ in the stability of communal leadership, political opportunities for contenders, resistance to competing institutions, and solidarity in the face of exogenous shocks.

To compare the various degree of party competition among the aboriginal societies, the author primarily conducts ethnographic work and interviews in indigenous tribes. Among indigenous communities where inherited hierarchy decides social prestige (i.e. chief villages), chiefs and headmen have retained their impact on contemporary politics. However, indigenous communities without centralized and inherited leadership (i.e. big man villages) have prevalent cleavages; as competing institutions and exogenous shocks magnify these cleavages and offer channels for rivalry parties to mobilize votes, villagers shift away from the single-party identification. Regression analyses additionally support these findings and suggests generalizable patterns of structural durability.

About the Speaker

Wan-Zi Lu is a third-year PhD student in the Department of Sociology. Her research interests include political sociology and economic sociology. During the past years, she has studied the party identification and the economic transition of the indigenous peoples in Taiwan.

*To learn more about the full Winter 2017 schedule, please visit: Winter Schedule

 

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology),  Dali Yang (Political Science), and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

 

February 23, Thomas Dubois, “Opiate of the Masses with Chinese Characteristics”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 “Opiate of the Masses with Chinese Characteristics – Interpreting China’s Religion Policy”

Thomas DuBois

Associate Professor, College of Asia and the Pacific.

Australian National University

4:30-6:00p.m., Thursday, February 23, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

Late in 2016, China released its newly revised Religious Affairs Law, which was immediately panned by critics as an aggressive intrusion into protected religious freedoms. In fact, the law is hardly new. It is consistent with the very specific way that the Communist Party has interpreted religious freedoms in the decades since the 1982 promulgation of “Basic Ideas and Policies Concerning Our Country’s Religious Question in the Socialist Era” initiated a more apparently tolerant stance. The talk traces the development of Chinese religion policy over three decades, closing with a discussion of the new law, and the recent rapprochement between China and the Vatican.

About the Speaker

Thomas DuBois is a historian of modern China.  His research focuses on Chinese religion and society, with a particular interest in northeast China. His publications include Sacred Village: Social Change and Religious Life in Rural North China (Hawaii, 2005), Casting Faiths: Imperialism and the Transformation of Religion in East and Southeast Asia (Palgrave, 2009), Religion and the Making of Modern East Asia (Cambridge, 2011), and most recently, Empire and the Meaning of Religion in Northeast Asia: Manchuria 1900-1945 (Cambridge, 2017). His research has also been featured in the Huffington Post and New York Times. Prof. DuBois received his undergraduate degree from University of Chicago and Ph.D. from UCLA.

* To learn more about our Winter program, please look at: Winter Schedule

 

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology),  Dali Yang (Political Science), and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


This particular East Asia Workshop event is sponsored by the Committee on Chinese Studies at the Center for East Asian Studies and East Asian Languages and Civilizations. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.