November 6 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

 

“Intergenerational Processes and Post-Socialist Transition

in Urban China” 

Presenter: Fangsheng Zhu

Master of Arts in the Social Sciences

University of Chicago

 

4:00-5:30pm, Tuesday

November 6, 2012

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract 

China’s post-socialist transition is ramified by intra-generational as well as inter-generational processes. The market transition debate focuses on the former but neglects the latter. Hence in the market transition debate, the intergenerational return to political capital is ignored, and the intergenerational power conversion and transmission are missing from the picture. Using a unique local dataset and a national dataset, this paper shows that 1) both political capital and human capital can be reproduced inter-generationally; 2) aside from reproduction, parental political capital converts to offspring’s informal political connections, while human capital does not; 3) parental political capital converts to offspring’s human capital, while the opposite conversion does not exist; 4) the ability of political capital to convert to other forms of capital suppresses the reproduction of political capital; 5) all these reproductions and conversions vary across the state sector and the market sector. Together, these findings show that 1) intergenerational return to political capital may exist in forms of informal political connections and human capital in offspring; 2) this power conversion partly accounts for the low reproduction rate of party membership; 3) the power conversion theory (Rona-tas, 1994) can be expanded from intra-generational to inter-generational, suggesting maintained inequality in market transition.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Le Lin (lelin2010@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

 

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

 

October 23 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

 

“Sharing High Growth across Generations:

Pensions and Demographic Transition in China”

 

Presenter: Zheng Michael Song

Assistant Professor of Economics

University of Chicago Booth School of  Business

 

4:00-5:30pm, Tuesday

October 23, 2012

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

 

Abstract 

Intergenerational inequality and old-age poverty are salient issues in contemporaryChina.China’s aging population threatens the fiscal sustainability of its pension system, a key vehicle for intergenerational redistribution. We analyze the positive and normative effects of alternative pension reforms, using a dynamic general equilibrium model that incorporates population dynamics and productivity growth. Although a reform is necessary, delaying its implementation implies large welfare gains for the (poorer) current generations, imposing only small costs on (richer) future generations. In contrast, a fully funded reform harms current generations, with small gains to future generations. High wage growth is key for these results.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Le Lin (lelin2010@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

 

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

 

October 9 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

 

“Land Requisition and Trust in Rural China”

 

Presenter: Travis Warner

Doctoral Student, Dept of Political Science

UniversityofChicago

 

4:00-5:30pm, Tuesday

October 9, 2012

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract

No domestic political issue angers rural Chinese like land requisition. According to one estimate, land conflicts accounted for more than 65% of the 185,000 “mass incidents” reported by the Chinese government in 2010. Clearly, land-related riots and demonstrations present a serious challenge toChina’s central leaders. But do rising levels of rural unrest threaten the legitimacy of the Communist Party? In this article, we shed light on the state-society implications of land requisition by asking whether the experience of losing one’s land erodes villagers’ trust in their leaders—both at the local and national levels. Analyzing data from two distinct villager surveys, we find that dispossession decreases trust in local officials, but not in the central government. We conclude that China’s leaders appear to have “room to maneuver” when it comes to addressing rural issues, although the prospect of declining trust in local officials remains a cause for concern.

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Le Lin (lelin2010@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

 

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

Autumn 2012 Schedule

Autumn 2012 Workshop Schedule

October 9

“Land Requisition and Trust in Rural China”

Travis Warner

Doctoral Student of Political Science,University of Chicago

October 23

“Sharing High Growth across Generations:

Pensions and Demographic Transition in China”

Zheng Michael Song

Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Chicago Booth School of Business

November 6

“The Inter-generational Attributes of State-based Categories of Inequality:

A Case Study in Urban China”

Fangsheng Zhu

Master of Arts in the Social Sciences,University of Chicago

November 20

“Performance Legitimacy, State Autonomy andChina’s Economic Development”

Dingxin Zhao

Professor of Sociology,University of Chicago

December 4

“Organizational Clientelism:

An Analysis of Private Entrepreneur Delegates in Chinese Local Legislatures”

Xin Sun

Doctoral Student of Political Science, Northwestern University

    The workshop meets on alternate Tuesdays 4:00-5:30pm at Pick Lounge, 5828 South University   Avenue. Abstracts are available on our website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/. Questions and comments should be addressed to the coordinator Le Lin: lelin2010@uchicago.edu

Faculty Sponsors:

Dali Yang (Political Science), daliyang@uchicago.edu

Dingxin Zhao (Sociology), dzhao@uchicago.edu

Zheng Michael Song (BoothSchoolof Business), Zheng.Song@chicagobooth.edu