East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society

February 18, 2020
by linzhuoli
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(Feb. 20) Shih-Fen Wang, “Japanese Imperialism, Women, Media: From the Perspective of Analyzing the Magazine, Taiwan Fujinkai”

EAST ASIA WORKSHOP: POLITICS, ECONOMY & SOCIETY Presents

 

“Japanese Imperialism, Women, Media: From the Perspective of Analyzing the Magazine, Taiwan Fujinkai 

Shih-Fen Wang

PhD Student

University of Tokyo

 

Feb. 20th, Thu 5:00-6:30 pm (NEW TIME FOR WINTER QUARTER!)

Tea Room, Social Science Research Building (2nd floor).

Refreshments will be provided

Abstract

This paper aims to understand how women in colonial Taiwan were influenced by Japanese imperialism and its culture by analyzing the magazine, Taiwan Fujinkai. I chose Taiwan Fujinkaifor analysis because of its rich content (each issue has at least 100 pages) and its longer publication period compared with other similar magazines. I focus on the first era of publication (1934-1936) in order to investigate the founder and chief editor KAKINUMA Fumiaki’s editing concept. KAKINUMA is known as a journalist whose main concern and passion was children’s and women’s issues. I analyze Taiwan Fujinkaifrom the perspective of Japanese people living in Japan, Japanese people living in Taiwan, and Taiwanese people living in Taiwan, to understand Taiwan during the Japanese colonial period. This is important because previous studies by Leo T.S. CHING (Becoming Japanese”, 2001) explained the formation of Taiwanese political and cultural identities under the dominant Japanese colonial discourse of assimilation and imperialization. However, most previous research overlooks that Japanese people living in Taiwan also faced many conflicts of their own identities while living in Taiwan.

The core of my research is to analyze and explain why the Japanese people living in Taiwan during that time called their daughters “Taiwanese Girls”, which had both positive and negative implications. The analysis and evidence of this phenomenon is extremely unique. It is interesting that the word usage of Taiwanese women in Taiwan Fujinkai was not only used by Taiwanese women born in Taiwan, but also by women born to second-generation Japanese-Taiwanese families. I conclude that women in colonial Taiwan had to be educated as modern and independent women in order to devote themselves to the Japanese imperial government. However, there is an ambiguous line between Taiwanese born in Taiwan and Japanese born in Taiwan. I argue that in order to develop a better understanding of colonial Taiwan in the 1930s, we cannot overlook this historical phenomenon.

February 10, 2020
by linzhuoli
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East Asia Workshop (Feb. 13) Xuefei Ren, “How China and India Govern Their Cities?”

EAST ASIA WORKSHOP: POLITICS, ECONOMY & SOCIETY Presents

 

“How China and India Govern Their Cities 

Xuefei Ren

Associate Professor of Sociology and Global Urban Studies, Michigan State University

UChicago Sociology Alumni

 

Feb. 13th, Thu 5:00-6:30 pm (NEW TIME FOR WINTER QUARTER!)

Tea Room, Social Science Research Building (2nd floor).

Refreshments will be provided

Abstract

Urbanization is rapidly overtaking China and India. This transformation has unleashed enormous pressures on land use, housing, and the environment. In this talk, Ren will present findings from her forthcoming book Governing the Urban in China and India: Land Grabs, Slum Clearance, and the War on Air Pollution (2020, Princeton University Press). Drawing upon historical-comparative analyses and extensive fieldwork in Beijing, Guangzhou, Wukan, Delhi, Mumbai, and Singur, the book investigates the ways that Chinese and Indian cities manage land acquisition, slum clearance, and air pollution. She argues that in China urban governance centers on territorial institutions, and in India, urban governance centers on associational politics, encompassing contingent alliances formed among state actors, the private sector, and civil society groups.

 

Bio

Xuefei Ren is associate professor of sociology and global urban studies at Michigan State University. Her work focuses on urban development, governance, architecture, and the built environment in global perspective. She is the author of two award-winning books: Building Globalization: Transnational Architecture Production in Urban China (University of Chicago Press, 2011) and Urban China (Polity Press, 2013). Currently she is working on a number of comparative projects, including a photo-documentary on Detroit and rustbelt China, and a series of articles examining informal settlements, mega-events, and spectacles in urban China, India and Brazil. She is a recipient of a number of distinguished fellowships and grants, including from the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Andrew Mellon Foundation, Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies, and American Council of Learned Societies. She received her MA in urban planning from Tokyo Metropolitan University, and Ph.D in Sociology from the University of Chicago.

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The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Ren, Xuefei – How China and India Govern Their Cities