East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society

January 19, 2018
by xuhaitong
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East Asia Workshop: 1/23, Xiaoxing Jin, “The Origin of the Evolutionary Misunderstanding: The Origin of Species in China”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

The Origin of the Evolutionary Misunderstanding: The Origin of Species in China”

 

Xiaoxing Jin

History PhD Student

University of Notre Dame

 

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, January 23rd, 2018

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Food will be provided*

 

Abstract

Darwinian ideas were developed, transformed, and even distorted when they were transmitted to the alien intellectual background of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century China. In China, the earliest references to Darwin appeared in the 1870s through the writings of Western missionaries who provided the Chinese with the earliest information on evolutionary doctrines, with Christian beliefs encoded into their texts. Meanwhile, Chinese ambassadors, literati, and overseas students contributed to the dissemination of evolutionary ideas with modest effect. The “evolutionary sensation” in China was, instead, generated by the Chinese Spencerian Yan Fu’s (1854-1921) paraphrased translation and reformulation of Huxley’s 1893 Romanes lecture. It was from this source that “Darwin” became well known in China—although it was Darwin’s name, rather than his ideas, that entered Chinese literati’s households. The Origin of Species itself began to receive attention only at the turn of the twentieth century. The translator, Ma Junwu (1881-1940), incorporated non-Darwinian doctrines, particularly Lamarckian and Spencerian principles, into his edition of the Chinese Origin. This partly reflected the importance of the pre-existing Chinese intellectual background. In this paper, I will elucidate Ma Junwu’s culturally-conditioned reinterpretation of the Origin, and situate his transformation of Darwin’s principal concepts—variation, adaptation, the struggle for existence, artificial selection and Natural Selection—in China’s broad historical context of the first two decades of the 20th century.

*To learn more about the workshop, please visit our workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

*Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UChicagoEAW/

*Subscribe or unsubscribe to the workshop mailing-list at: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/info/east-asia

*Questions and concerns can be addressed to the student coordinator Haitong Xu (xuhaitong@uchciago.edu) and Yang Xiang (xiangalan@uchicago.edu)

 

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), xisong@uchicago.edu

Dali Yang (Political Science), daliyang@uchicago.edu

Dingxin Zhao (Sociology), dzhao@uchicago.edu

 

The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

 

January 7, 2018
by xuhaitong
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East Asia Workshop: 1/9, Dali Yang, “China’s Illiberal Regulatory State in Comparative Perspective”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

China’s Illiberal Regulatory State in Comparative Perspective”

 

Dali Yang

Professor of Political Science

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, January 9th, 2018

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be provided*

 

Abstract

This study reviews the development of Chinese regulation against the history of the development of the regulatory state in the West. Section One discusses the rise of the regulatory state in western democracies in an age of concern about state expansion. It notes that, generally speaking, the regulatory state in a liberal democratic setting has become accepted as enabling liberal democracies to combine democratic legitimacy with the independence and professionalism of unelected regulatory bodies. Section Two offers a quick overview of the establishment and proliferation of regulatory institutions in China in the context of continued single Party rule and strong state dominance. Section Three delineates the politics of changes to the regulatory regime from the perspective of political risk and points to dynamics that are animating regulatory state building with Chinese characteristics, with special reference to environmental regulation. Section Four concludes.

About the Speaker

Dali L. Yang is the William Claude Reavis Professor in the Department of Political Science and the College and Senior Advisor to the President and the Provost on Global Initiatives at the University of Chicago. Between 2010 and June 2016, he served as the founding Faculty Director of the University of Chicago Center in Beijing, a university-wide initiative to promote collaboration and exchange between UChicago scholars and students and their Chinese counterparts. He is also a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs.

Professor Yang’s research is focused on the politics of China’s development and governance. His current projects include studies of social regulation, environmental governance, social and political trust, and state-society relations. He also continues to examine the political economy of the Great Leap Famine (1959-1961), the worst in human history. Among his books are Remaking the Chinese Leviathan:  Market Transition and the Politics of Governance in China (Stanford University Press, 2004); Calamity and Reform in China: State, Rural Society and Institutional Change since the Great Leap Famine (Stanford University Press, 1996); and Beyond Beijing: Liberalization and the Regions in China (Routledge, 1997).  He is also editor or co-editor of several other volumes, most recently The Global Recession and China’s Political Economy (Palgrave, 2012). A contributor to The United States and the Rise of China and India, by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, his recent articles have appeared in Comparative Political Studies, International Political Science Review, Journal of Contemporary China, and Political Studies.

*To learn more about the workshop, please visit our workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

*Subscribe or unsubscribe to the workshop mailing-list at: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/info/east-asia

*Questions and concerns can be addressed to the student coordinator Haitong Xu (xuhaitong@uchciago.edu) and Yang Xiang (xiangalan@uchicago.edu)

 

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), xisong@uchicago.edu

Dali Yang (Political Science), daliyang@uchicago.edu

Dingxin Zhao (Sociology), dzhao@uchicago.edu

 

The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

 

January 6, 2018
by xuhaitong
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East Asia Workshop: Winter 2018 Workshop Schedule

EAST ASIA WORKSHOP: POLITICS, ECONOMY & SOCIETY

Winter 2018 Workshop Schedule

 

January 9

“China’s Illiberal Regulatory State in Comparative Perspective”

Dali Yang

Professor of Political Science

University of Chicago

 

January 23

“The Origin of the Evolutionary Misunderstanding: The Origin of Species in China”

Xiaoxing Jin

PhD Student, History

University of Notre Dame

 

February 6

“Regulatory Protection and the Geography of Trade: Evidence from Chinese Customs Data”

Robert Gulotty

Assistant Professor of Political Science

University of Chicago

 

February  20

“Transnational Linkages and Grassroots Civil Society in China”

Tiffany Barron

Committee on International Relations, Master Student

University of Chicago

 

February  27

“The Boundary of Rights Claims in Authoritarian Courts: Examination of Administrative Litigation Cases in China 2002-2017”

Jongyoon Baik

PhD Student, Political Science

University of Chicago

 

March 6

“Embodying Medical Integration: Becoming Expert in Uncertain Times”

Miao Jenny Hua

PhD Candidate, Anthropology

University of Chicago

 

 

Unless otherwise stated, the East Asia Workshop meets on Every Other Tuesday 4:30-6pm at Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Avenue. This workshop features interdisciplinary scholarship addressing topics relating to social, political, economic as well as cultural matters and issues in East Asia. Our presenters come from various disciplines such as sociology, political science, economics, anthropology, history, etc. The goal of this workshop is to foster communication and collaboration among students and scholars whose interest lies in East Asia at the University of Chicago and in the wider East Asian Studies community.

 

* Abstract or description of each presentation will be posted on our website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia

* Questions and comments can be addressed to the student coordinators Haitong Xu: xuhaitong@uchicago.edu and Yang Xiang: xiangalan@uchicago.edu

* Subscribe or unsubscribe to our workshop mailing-list at: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/info/east-asia

 

Faculty Sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), xisong@uchicago.edu

Dali Yang (Political Science), daliyang@uchicago.edu

Dingxin Zhao (Sociology), dzhao@uchicago.edu

 

The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

November 13, 2017
by xuhaitong
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East Asia Workshop: 11/14 Haichao Wu, “Born-Global: Why Small Firms Love International Trade”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

“Born-Global: Why Small Firms Love International Trade”

 

Haichao Wu

MAPSS Student

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, November 14th, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be provided*

 

Abstract

International business is often considered a game for large multinational corporations (MNCs); in general, we expect that small businesses will be unproductive, focus on the domestic market, and oppose the trade liberalization measures that MNCs find so attractive. New survey data challenges this conventional wisdom by demonstrating that out of 552 Chinese firms interviewed, the smaller companies actually support international trade as strongly as their larger and foreign counterparts. This paper argues that China’s position on the global technology ladder and its domestic economic institutions have encouraged small firms to welcome trade liberalization with its attendant increase in technology transfer and export dependence on the part of these firms. A comparative case study of structured interviews with 36 small Chinese firms confirms the hypothesis. Finally, this paper assesses the robustness of my theory by examining four alternative explanations for this unexpected support of international trade: economic prosperity, trade policy-making processes, the degree of higher education attained by firm managers, and the “liberal” constraints imposed by international organizations.

*To learn more about the workshop, please visit our workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

*Subscribe or unsubscribe to the workshop mailing-list at: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/info/east-asia

*Questions and concerns can be addressed to the student coordinator Haitong Xu (xuhaitong@uchciago.edu) and Yang Xiang (xiangalan@uchicago.edu)

 

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), xisong@uchicago.edu

Dali Yang (Political Science), daliyang@uchicago.edu

Dingxin Zhao (Sociology), dzhao@uchicago.edu

 

The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

October 30, 2017
by xuhaitong
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East Asia Workshop: 10/31, Wenyan Deng, “Threats from Within Assessing the Diversionary Escalation Theory”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

“Threats from Within Assessing the Diversionary Escalation Theory”

 

Wenyan Deng

Data Manager

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, October 31st, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be provided*

 

Abstract

The diversionary war theory suggests that leaders respond to domestic unrest by escalating tensions abroad. Past research suggests that territorial issues provide the easiest diversionary channel. Along these lines, China analysts such as Howard French have speculated that the country’s more escalatory maritime territorial behaviors in recent years are responses to its slowing economic growth. However, other scholars, such as M. Taylor Fravel, have contended that, historically, the PRC undertakes territorial escalation in response to changes in its relative claim power, rather than domestic crises. This article makes two contributions to this debate between a state-level and a domestic level theory of escalation. First, it analyzes the PRC’s maritime territorial and homeland disputes since 2002 and argues that, in the past two decades, the PRC has been more likely to use force when other claimants have become less aggressive. This observation in the PRC’s maritime territorial behavior contradicts Fravel’s state level, claim power-based escalation theory, which seems to apply more accurately to the PRC’s Cold War-era frontier disputes. Second, this paper offers a corrective mechanism to the traditional diversionary war theory, which posits that internal unrest and external aggression have a linear positive relationship. Instead, I argue that, at low levels of internal unrest, authoritarian states are also likely to increase territorial aggressiveness, because autocratic governments facing low internal unrest and enjoying strong control over their society are confident and likely to pursue external territorial goals more aggressively. Consistent with this mechanism’s predictions, the paper shows that, in both periods with very low and very high internal unrest, the PRC government has been more likely to escalate territorial tensions.

*To learn more about the workshop, please visit our workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

*Subscribe or unsubscribe to the workshop mailing-list at: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/info/east-asia

*Questions and concerns can be addressed to the student coordinator Haitong Xu (xuhaitong@uchciago.edu) and Yang Xiang (xiangalan@uchicago.edu)

 

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), xisong@uchicago.edu

Dali Yang (Political Science), daliyang@uchicago.edu

Dingxin Zhao (Sociology), dzhao@uchicago.edu

 

The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

 

October 23, 2017
by xuhaitong
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East Asia Workshop: 10/27, Scott Relyea: “‘A Fence on Which We Can Rely’: Asserting Sovereignty in Early Twentieth Century Southwest China”

Scott Relyea

Assistant Professor, Appalachian State University

 

‘A Fence on Which We Can Rely’: Asserting Sovereignty in Early Twentieth Century Southwest China

 

Friday, October 27th, 4:00-6:00 PM

John Hope Franklin Room [SSR 224]

**Please note the date and location for this session**

 

Discussant: Tian Yuan, PhD Student, University of Chicago History Department

 

Professor Scott Relyea will be presenting one of his current works-in-progress titled “Indigenizing International Law in Early Twentieth Century China: Sovereignty in the Sino-Tibetan Borderland,” Professor Relyea provides the following abstract:

 

This paper analyses the introduction of international law into China during the Qing Dynasty’s last decades and the first few years of the Republic of China. It explores the influence of two international law texts, the translation Wanguo gongfa (The Public Law of All States), published in Beijing in 1864, and perhaps the first indigenously written international law text in China, Gongfa daoyuan (The Origins of International Law), published in Chengdu around 1899. Building on scholarship exploring the global circulation of knowledge, which focuses largely on political and intellectual centres, this research offers an alternative perspective from the borderlands of Asia, from the interstices of global power where states and empires met and were transformed by the norms and principles of international law, especially territoriality and sovereignty. I argue that local Qing officials overseeing the Kham borderland of eastern Tibet during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries adopted the conceptual basis of international law, whereas central Qing government officials were slow to do so. It was in such contentious borderlands that theoretical claims to sovereignty under international law intersected with the actual exercise of authority, where Sichuan Province officials, influenced by these two texts, adapted the norm of territorial sovereignty to both exert and assert absolute Qing authority in Kham as a stepping stone toward the whole of Tibet. During these tumultuous years in China’s transition from imperial to state form, the actions and successes of these borderland officials in Kham fostered a more thorough adoption and application of international law principles by central government officials, especially during the first years of the Republic of China. This manifest in Republican Chinese negotiators referring to these actions in Kham as substantiation for appeal to the international law principle of ‘effective occupation’ at the Simla Conference (1913-14).

 

Professor Relyea’s paper can be found at the EAT Histories Website. The password is “simlafence”

 

As always, first-time attendees are welcome. Light refreshments and snacks will be served. This event is co-sponsored by the East Asia: Transregional Histories Workshop and the East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society.

 

October 12, 2017
by xuhaitong
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East Asia Workshop: Oct. 17th, Thomas Telhelm, “The Rice Theory of Culture: Evidence that Historical Rice Farming Shaped Culture in Southern China”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

“The Rice Theory of Culture: Evidence that Historical Rice Farming Shaped Culture in Southern China

 

Thomas Telhelm

Assistant Professor of Behavioral Science

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, October 17th, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be provided*

 

Abstract

Cross-cultural psychologists have mostly contrasted Asia with the West. In this talk, the speaker will give evidence that there are significant cultural differences within China and within India. By testing 1,162 Han Chinese participants in six sites, the author found that people in southern China are more interdependent and holistic-thinking than people in the north. The author proposes that rice farming’s irrigation and high labor requirements gave southern China a tight, interdependent culture. In contrast, traditional wheat farming required less labor and less coordination, giving northern China a more free-wheeling independent culture. A separate study in India also revealed differences between traditional rice-farming and wheat-farming areas.

 

About the speaker

Thomas Talhelm studies how culture affects the way we behave. One of his recent major projects was studying how rice and wheat agriculture have given northern and southern China two very different cultures. His research has appeared in a variety of publications including Science, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, and Current Directions in Psychological Science.

Thomas lived in China for five years teaching high school in Guangzhou as a Princeton in Asia fellow, as a freelance journalist in Beijing, and most recently as a Fulbright scholar and an NSF Graduate Research Fellow. While living in Beijing, Thomas founded Smart Air, a social enterprise that ships low-cost air purifiers to help people breathe clean air without shelling out thousands of dollars for expensive purifiers.

Thomas earned his Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Virginia and a B.A. with Highest Honors in psychology and Spanish from the University of Michigan.

 

*To learn more about the workshop, please visit our workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

*Subscribe or unsubscribe to the workshop mailing-list at: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/info/east-asia

*Questions and concerns can be addressed to the student coordinator Haitong Xu (xuhaitong@uchciago.edu) and Yang Xiang (xiangalan@uchicago.edu)

 

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), xisong@uchicago.edu

Dali Yang (Political Science), daliyang@uchicago.edu

Dingxin Zhao (Sociology), dzhao@uchicago.edu

 

The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

October 12, 2017
by xuhaitong
0 comments

East Asia Workshop: Oct. 3rd, Xunchao Zhang, “Authoritarian Hawks: Authoritarianism as Microfoundations for Hawkish Foreign Policy Preferences in China”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

Authoritarian Hawks: Authoritarianism as Microfoundations for Hawkish Foreign Policy Preferences in China”

 

Xunchao Zhang

Analyst at Program on Political Violence (PPV) at CPOST

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, October 3rd, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be provided*

 

Abstract

Who are the foreign policy hawks in China? Existing literature focuses on nationalism as an explanation for popular hawkishness. However, recent empirical examination of survey data has challenged the notion of rising nationalism as a source of Chinese hawkishness. Drawing on political psychology literature, I seek to explain the hawkish preferences of ordinary Chinese citizens as the consequence of a popular illiberal authoritarian ideology, rather than nationalism. There is scant literature examining the political manifestations of authoritarian dispositions in the foreign policy domain, and moreover, international relations (IR) researchers have paid more attention to authoritarian regimes as opposed to individuals who subscribe to authoritarian ideology. Hence, this paper is an attempt to bridge the authoritarian personality literature and the IR study of hawkishness. Using data generated by a large-scale opt-in survey as well as an original causal mediation experiment fielded in China, I argue that individual foreign policy hawkishness is a result of externalization of domestic authoritarianism political values, particularly collectivism and punitiveness

.

 

*To learn more about the workshop, please visit our workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

*Subscribe or unsubscribe to the workshop mailing-list at: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/info/east-asia

*Questions and concerns can be addressed to the student coordinator Haitong Xu (xuhaitong@uchciago.edu) and Yang Xiang (xiangalan@uchicago.edu)

 

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), xisong@uchicago.edu

Dali Yang (Political Science), daliyang@uchicago.edu

Dingxin Zhao (Sociology), dzhao@uchicago.edu

 

The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

October 12, 2017
by xuhaitong
0 comments

East Asia Workshop: Autumn 2017 Workshop Schedule

EAST ASIA WORKSHOP: POLITICS, ECONOMY & SOCIETY

Autumn 2017 Workshop Schedule

 

October 3

“Authoritarianism as Microfoundations for Hawkish Foreign Policy Preferences in China”

Xunchao Zhang

Analyst at Program on Political Violence (PPV) at CPOST

University of Chicago

 

October 17

“The rice theory of culture: Evidence historical rice farming shaped culture in southern China”

Thomas Telhelm

Assistant Professor of Behavioral Science

University of Chicago

 

October 27

“A Fence on which We can Rely: Asserting Sovereignty in Early Twentieth Century Southwest China”

Collaborate Event with the East Asia: Transregional Histories Workshop

Scott Relyea

Assistant Professor, Department of History

Appalachian State University

 

October 31

“Threats from Within Assessing the Diversionary Escalation Theory”

Wenyan Deng

Data Manager

University of Chicago

 

November 14

“Born-Global: Why Small Firms Love International Trade”

Wu Haichao

MAPSS Student

University of Chicago

 

November 28

“Biding Seats for High School Admissions In China”

Congyi Zhou & Tong Wang

PhD of the Harris School of Public Policy

University of Chicago

 

Unless otherwise stated, the East Asia Workshop meets on Every Other Tuesday 4:30-6pm at Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Avenue. This workshop features interdisciplinary scholarship addressing topics relating to social, political, economic as well as cultural matters and issues in East Asia. Our presenters come from various disciplines such as sociology, political science, economics, anthropology, history, etc. The goal of this workshop is to foster communication and collaboration among students and scholars whose interest lies in East Asia at the University of Chicago and in the wider East Asian Studies community.

 

* Abstract or description of each presentation will be posted on our website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia

* Questions and comments can be addressed to the student coordinators Haitong Xu: xuhaitong@uchicago.edu and Yang Xiang: xiangalan@uchicago.edu

* Subscribe or unsubscribe to our workshop mailing-list at: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/info/east-asia

 

Faculty Sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), xisong@uchicago.edu

Dali Yang (Political Science), daliyang@uchicago.edu

Dingxin Zhao (Sociology), dzhao@uchicago.edu

 

The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

May 10, 2016
by xuyan
0 comments

May 17, Xiao-bo Yuan, “Economies of Exposure: the ethics of concealment and revelation in Chinese Christianities”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

 “Economies of Exposure: the ethics of concealment and revelation in Chinese Christianities”

Xiao-bo Yuan

PhD Student, Department of Anthropology

The University of Chicago

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

Abstract

In this presentation, I draw on fieldwork conducted among Christian communities in the Nanjing metropolitan area to examine how aspirations to publicity or secrecy are expressed and contested within different (registered and unregistered) Christian communities. Through these cases, I examine how publicity and secrecy are calibrated and given value, and how assumptions about the intersections between religious belief and public life give shape to very different Christian institutional forms and practices in China. Rather than considering the above- and underground distinction to be primarily a product of state regulations and churches’ assent or resistance to government monitoring, this paper attends to the labors of Christian institutions in “opening up” and “going underground” as projects of producing specific kinds of (in)visibility. These labors are informed, I suggest, by “economies of exposure” — differentially distributed possibilities for challenging the state’s structures of legibility for religious organizations. Here, I explore the sensibilities toward publicity and secrecy, exposure and concealment, that organize the practices of Christians in China. What forms of publicity do churches aspire to, and how are they motivated to do so? How are conditions of secrecy maintained in other instances? What kinds of Christian subjects are produced through the work of revelation and concealment?

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Yan Xu (xuyan@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Xi Song, Dali Yang and Dingxin Zhao

 

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

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