Monday, January 8th: Alex Jania “For Us, The Earth Still Shakes: Thoughts on Disaster Memorialization in Japan and Methodologies of Emotional History”

Alex Jania

PhD Student, Department of History, University of Chicago

” For Us, The Earth Still Shakes: Thoughts on Disaster Memorialization in Japan and Methodologies of Emotional History”

Monday, January 8th 12:00-1:15 PM

The Library at the Martin Marty Center [Swift Hall]

Discussant: Paride Stortini, PhD Student, University of Chicago Divinity School

Please join the East Asia: Transregional Histories workshop in welcoming Alex Jania as he presents his work-in-progress, titled “For Us, The Earth Still Shakes: Thoughts on Disaster Memorialization in Japan and Methodologies of Emotional History” Mr. Jania provides the following abstract:

This paper, based on pre-dissertation archival and field research, presents a methodology that attends to the emotional aspects of natural disaster memorialization in modern Japan. In particular, the paper proposes a methodology that utilizes the combination of material culture, oral history, and textual sources in order to compose an emotional history. Using relevant examples from the archives and the field, this study will exhibit this new approach to emotional history and discuss its general relevance for the discipline of history as a whole.

Alex’s paper can be found in the post below.

As always, first-time attendees are welcome. Please make note of the distinct time and place for this event. In addition, a lunch will also be served at this event.

If you have any questions or require assistance to attend, please contact Spencer Stewart at sdstewart@uchicago.edu or Robert Burgos at rburgos@uchicago.edu

 

Thursday, March 9 : Jessa Dahl

Please join us next week as the East Asia: Transregional Histories Workshop welcomes our own

 

Jessa Dahl

PhD Student, University of Chicago

“After Dejima: Nagasaki’s ‘Heroic Women’ and Networks of International Exchange, 1827-1899”

Thursday, March 9th

4:00PM – 6:00PM

John Hope Franklin Room (SSR 224)

 

Jessa will be presenting an early draft of her dissertation proposal, which centers on personal and professional networks managed by women in nineteenth century Nagasaki. Jessa describes her project as follows:

 

As a treaty port community, Nagasaki experienced the dynamism of Japan’s entry into the nineteenth century international system first hand. Unlike the other treaty ports, however, Nagasaki was built upon already extant personal and professional networks of intercultural exchange that were over two hundred years old. It was also the only treaty port in which a small cohort of women participated prominently the most vital networks of exchange including international trade, the exchange of ideas and technology, diplomacy and even prostitution. My research will show that these two developments are not coincidental. I will argue that Nagasaki’s history as an established site of international exchange provided a base for the subsequent dynamic transformation that allowed these women to capitalize on the opportunities that were afforded to them. By showing how these women and their networks adapted to and transformed under the new treaty port system, I hope to explore what conditions made their success possible and illustrate how kaikoku (lit. “opening of the country”) and Japan’s subsequent modernization transformed local sites of international exchange.

 

As always, first-time attendees are welcome. Light refreshments and snacks will be served.

 

If you have any questions or require assistance to attend, please contact Jessa Dahl at jdahl@uchicago.edu or Erin Newton at emnewton@uchicago.edu.

Covell Meyskens

Guerilla Urbanism: Panzhihua and the Alternate Socialist Form Of Late Maoist Urbanity

Time and Date: May 22 (Thursday), 4-6pm

Venue: Cobb 112

Speaker: Covell Meyskens, Ph.D. Candidate, History, University of Chicago

Discussant: Andy Bruno, Assistant Professor, History, Northern Illinois University