November 11 4PM–David Andrew Knight (Co-sponsor with APEA)

David Andrew Knight

“Plain Becomes Patterned: Li Deyu and the White Lotus”

Friday, November 11, 4-6 PM

CEAS 319 (1155 E 60th St)

Discussant:

Yiren Zheng (EALC)

The East Asia: Transregional Histories Workshop, in conjunction with the Art and Politics of East Asia Workshop, is delighted to host David Andrew Knight next Friday, 11/11. Below is a brief abstract of the work:

This paper is part of a larger project that situates the fu 賦 poetry of the ninth century minister Li Deyu 李德裕 (787-850) within the context of his life. Through the focal point of a fu poem about a white lotus flower written by Li Deyu, one of the most powerful men of his day, I will demonstrate how this poem captures a retrievable moment of poetic creation. I have discovered that Li Deyu’s fu poem on the white lotus is a literary recreation of his encounter with the fifteen year old Xu Pan who was soon to become his concubine. By analyzing a key stanza in the poem, I will illuminate the links between Li’s literary life and his real life.

The paper can be found at the East Asia: Transregional Histories workshop website at this link. The password is “lotus”. Please do not cite or circulate this paper without express permission of the author.

As always, first-time attendees are welcome. Light refreshments and snacks will be served.

If you have any questions or require assistance to attend, please contact Jessa Dahl at jdahl@uchicago.edu or Erin Newton at emnewton@uchicago.edu.

TOMORROW, Friday Nov 4th at 4:00 PM: Jamie Monson

Jamie Monson

Professor, Michigan State University

“Learning by Heart: Practice as knowledge building along the TAZARA Railway in late Twentieth Century Mang’ula”

Friday, November 4, 4:00 – 6:00 PM

CEAS Room 319 (1155 E 60th St)

Professor Monson’s presentation will include photographs and video clips demonstrating her ethno-historical methodology. Her paper can be found on the East Asia: Transregional Histories Website. 

This paper explores the transmission of knowledge from Chinese experts to African workers during the construction of the TAZARA railway in Mang’ula, Tanzania. Using a practice called shou ba shou (literally “hand holding hand”), the Chinese experts taught local workers how to use drills and lathes to build railroads. Monson’s ethno-historical research reveals that such processes “spanned and charted major upheavals of the mid-twentieth century in the global history of work, technology and politics.” This railway project bridged the divide between China’s socialist internationalism and Cultural Revolution, on the one hand, and Tanzania’s socialist experiment on the other. As Monson states, “the meeting of Chinese experts and African workers in the secluded mountain stronghold of Mang’ula formed a connection between two frontline landscapes of railway building during the Cold War – from the frontiers of Sichuan and Yunnan to the rugged escarpment of the Udzungwa mountains.“

As always, first-time attendees are welcome. Light refreshments and snacks will be served.

If you have any questions or require assistance to attend, please contact Jessa Dahl at jdahl@uchicago.edu or Erin Newton at emnewton@uchicago.edu.

Friday, November 4 at 4PM: Jamie Monson

Jamie Monson

Professor, Michigan State University

“Learning by Heart: Practice as knowledge building along the TAZARA Railway in late Twentieth Century Mang’ula”

Friday, November 4, 4:00 – 6:00 PM

CEAS Room 319 (1155 E 60th St)

Professor Monson’s presentation will include photographs and video clips demonstrating her ethno-historical methodology. Her paper can be found on the East Asia: Transregional Histories Website. 

This paper explores the transmission of knowledge from Chinese experts to African workers during the construction of the TAZARA railway in Mang’ula, Tanzania. Using a practice called shou ba shou (literally “hand holding hand”), the Chinese experts taught local workers how to use drills and lathes to build railroads. Monson’s ethno-historical research reveals that such processes “spanned and charted major upheavals of the mid-twentieth century in the global history of work, technology and politics.” This railway project bridged the divide between China’s socialist internationalism and Cultural Revolution, on the one hand, and Tanzania’s socialist experiment on the other. As Monson states, “the meeting of Chinese experts and African workers in the secluded mountain stronghold of Mang’ula formed a connection between two frontline landscapes of railway building during the Cold War – from the frontiers of Sichuan and Yunnan to the rugged escarpment of the Udzungwa mountains.“

As always, first-time attendees are welcome. Light refreshments and snacks will be served.

If you have any questions or require assistance to attend, please contact Jessa Dahl at jdahl@uchicago.edu or Erin Newton at emnewton@uchicago.edu.

Reminder: TODAY 4:00PM — Kickstarting Your Research: Advice on Starting a Seminar Paper and Masters’ Thesis [EAT Histories]

Please join the East Asia: Transregional Histories Workshop TODAY for:

Kickstarting your Research: Advice on Starting a Seminar Paper and Masters’ Thesis in the History Department

TODAY from 4:00-6:00 PM

John Hope Franklin Room, SSD 224

 

Panelists: Kyle Pan (Japanese history, PhD)

Carl Kubler (Chinese history PhD, MAPSS alumni)

Thomas Gimbel (Japanese History, PhD)

 

How do I define a research question? Where should I start the research process? How can my current research contribute to my dissertation?  To help address these questions and more, we will be joined by a panel of current students who have successfully (and sometimes with great suffering) completed a seminar paper. After a brief introduction of their early experiences with research we will move onto a discussion of research methods and challenges specific to the seminar paper experience in the history department. While this event is specially designed for MA and early stage PhD students, students of all stages and from all fields of study are encouraged to attend.

 

There is no pre-circulated paper for this event, and first-time attendees are welcome. Light refreshments will be served.

 

If you have any questions or require assistance to attend, please contact Jessa Dahl at jdahl@uchicago.edu or Erin Newton at emnewton@uchicago.edu.

TOMORROW: Kickstarting your Research: Advice on Starting a Seminar Paper and Masters’ Thesis in the History Department

Please join the East Asia Transregional Histories Workshop TOMORROW for:

Kickstarting your Research: Advice on Starting a Seminar Paper and Masters’ Thesis in the History Department
4:00-6:00 PM
John Hope Franklin Room, SSD 224

Panelists: Kyle Pan(Japanese history, PhD)
Carl Kubler (Chinese history PhD, MAPSS alumni)
Thomas Gimbel (Japanese History, PhD)

How do I define a research question? Where should I start the research process? How can my current research contribute to my dissertation? To help address these questions and more, we will be joined by a panel of current students who have successfully (and sometimes with great suffering) completed a seminar paper. After a brief introduction of their early experiences with research we will move onto a discussion of research methods and challenges specific to the seminar paper experience in the history department. While this event is specially designed for MA and early stage PhD students, students of all stages and from all fields of study are encouraged to attend.

There is no pre-circulated paper for this event, and first-time attendees are welcome. Light refreshments will be served.

If you have any questions or require assistance to attend, please contact Jessa Dahl at jdahl@uchicago.edu or Erin Newton at emnewton@uchicago.edu.

Frontiers Across Eurasia: A Faculty Forum — October 13, 4:00 PM

Please join the East Asia: Transregional Histories Workshop for our first meeting of the Fall Quarter.

Frontiers Across Eurasia: A Faculty Forum

Thursday, October 13, 4:00 – 6:00 PM

CEAS Room 319 (1155 E 60th St)

Presenters:

Kenneth Pomeranz (University Professor of Modern Chinese History and in the College; Member of the Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge) “From ‘Civilizing’ to ‘Modernizing’: Late Imperial and 20th Century Projects to Remake Chinese Frontier Communities”

and

Faith Hillis (Assistant Professor of Russian History and the College) “Frontiers and the Relationship between Center and Periphery in Russian History.”

Discussants:

Robert Burgos (PhD Student, History, University of Chicago) and Alexander Hubert (PhD Student, History, University of Chicago

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As participants in EAT Histories’ first-ever faculty forum, Professors Pomeranz and Professor Hillis will each give a brief presentation on their recent work frontiers on opposite ends of the Eurasian continent. During the subsequent discussion we hope to draw connections between these two seemingly disparate sites of analysis and explore the boundaries of the frontiers of the nineteenth and early twentieth century.

There is no pre-circulated paper for this event, and first-time attendees are welcome. Light refreshments will be served.

If you have any questions or require assistance to attend, please contact Jessa Dahl at jdahl@uchicago.edu or Erin Newton at emnewton@uchicago.edu.

Fall Welcome Reception — October 5

East Asia: Transregional Histories Workshop Welcome Reception

Wednesday, October 5th

5:00-7:00 PM

Jimmy’s (Woodlawn Tap on 55th St)

The EAT Histories workshop will be holding its Welcome Reception TOMORROW at Jimmy’s (Woodlawn Tap) from 5:00-7:00PM. Please stop by at any time to meet other workshop participants, learn more about the Fall 2016 schedule, and take a break from the week two blues!

Fall 2016 Schedule

The East Asia: Transregional Histories Workshop is proud to present our schedule for the Fall 2016 Quarter! Unless otherwise noted, all meetings take place from 4:00 – 6:00 PM in the John Hope Franklin Room (SS 224) and refreshments will be served.

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10/13 Frontiers Across Eurasia: A Faculty Forum

Presenters: Kenneth Pomeranz: “From ‘Civilizing’ to ‘Modernizing’: Late Imperial and 20th Century Projects to Remake Chinese Frontier Communities.”

Faith Hillis: “Frontiers and the Relationship between Center and Periphery in Russian History”

4:00 – 6:00 PM

Location: CEAS Room 319

 

10/17 Documentary Screening and Discussion: “Coming Home in 70 Years: Repatriation of Korean Victims of Forced Labor and Reconciliation in East Asia.

Presenters: Byung-ho Chung (Hanyang University), David Plath (University of Illinois), Tonohira Yoshihiko (Ichijoji Temple), Song Ki-Chan (Ritsumeikan University), and Sohn Sung Hyun (Korea Art Conservatory)

5:00 – 8:00 PM

Location: CEAS Room 319

 

10/20 Student-led Panel: Kickstarting your Research: Advice on Starting a Seminar Paper and Masters’ Thesis in the History Department

 

11/4 Presenter: Jamie Monson (Michigan State University)

Title: “China-Africa Railway Crossings: Cold War Techno-Politics at Work”

4:00 – 6:00 PM

Location: CEAS Room 319

 

11/11 Presenter: David Andrew Knight (University of Chicago, co-sponsored with APEA)

Title: “Li Deyu and the ‘Golden Pine.'”

4:00-6:00 PM

Location: CEAS Room 319

 

11/17 Presenter: Liping Wang, (Assistant Professor, University of Hong Kong)

Title: “Legal Pluralism or Jurisdictional Nexuses: The Transformation of Jurisdictional Boundaries in China-Inner Mongolia, 1900-1930”

 

11/30 Presenter: Kyle Gardner (University of Chicago)

Title: “The Space Between: Trade, Cosmology, and Modes of Seeing in Independent Ladakh”

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Please mark the following days and times down on your calendars and join us for an engaging and productive year!