January 17th, 2020: Panpan Yang

Please join us on Friday, January 17th 2020  from 4:30-6:30 pm in CWAC 152.

We are delighted to welcome Panpan Yang, PhD Candidate in Cinema and Media Studies & East Asian Languages and Civilizations who will be presenting part of her dissertation in a workshop titled “Ink on Screen, or What Animation Calls Thinking.”

W.J.T. Mitchell, Gaylord Donnelley Distinguished Service Professor, Departments of English, Art History, and Visual Arts will provide a response.

Event co-sponsored with the Visual and Material Perspectives on East Asia Workshop

Herdboy and the Flute (Shanghai Animation Studio, 1963). Courtesy of the China Film Archive.

This presentation reanimates the history of ink animation (水墨動畫) from the 1960s to the present. In its two golden eras, Shanghai Animation Studio produced some extremely exquisite ink animated films, such as Herdboy and the Flute (1963) and Feeling from Mountain and Water (1988). Most frames of these ink animated films, if frozen, are Chinese landscape paintings (山水畫, sometimes translated as “mountain-and-water paintings”). I show that the animated landscapes in the distinct genre of Chinese animation importune contemplation on space and time to a degree unthinkable in either live-action cinema or traditional “motionless” landscape images in painting, photography, and other media. Segueing into the recent trend of experimental ink animation, this talk also addresses how animation, in all its mobility, moves in and out of the sphere of contemporary Chinese art.


Panpan Yang is a Ph.D. candidate in the joint program in Cinema and Media Studies and East Asian Languages and Civilizations. She studies East Asian cinema, media, and visual arts. Her dissertation, of which today’s talk is a part, examines Chinese animation in relation to other art forms. Supported by UChicago Arts, she is also working on a work of experimental animation, which animates a series of “wave and ripple” drawings from Hamonshū, a 1903 Japanese design book by little known artist Mori Yuzan.

We look forward to seeing you!

Yours in Mass Cult,

Sophie and Tanya

December 6th, 2019: Pablo Gonçalo

Please join us on Friday, Dec 6, 2019 from 11:00am-12:30pm in Cobb 311.

We are delighted to welcome Pablo Gonçalo, an assistant professor in the Dept of Film and Video at the University of Brasília, UnB. He will be presenting a draft of an article, titled “Speculative Archaeology: Unfilmed Scripts in Classical Hollywood”

Pablo’s document is available for download here.

Please do not circulate without permission.

Email either Sophie (sophielynch@uchicago.edu) or Tanya (tanyad@uchicago.edu) for the password.

Lunch will be served.

We look forward to seeing you!

Yours in Mass Cult,

Sophie and Tanya


Pablo Gonçalo is an assistant professor at the University of Brasília,
UnB. Currently, he is a Fulbright visiting scholar at the University
of Chicago and has also done his post-doctoral research in partnership
with the University of São Paulo. The history of unfilmed scripts has
been his main research topic, by which he has been proposing the
concept of speculative archeology. Therefore, he has been researching
unfilmed scripts in German and Brazilian film history, and, more
recently, in the classic Hollywood era. In 2016 he published O cinema
como refúgio da escrita: roteiros e paisagens em Peter Handke e Wim
Wenders, edited by Annablume, which is his first book. His Ph.D. was
held at the University of Rio de Janeiro, with a partnership with the
Free University of Berlin, when DAAD sponsored him. He has had papers
published in journals such as Journal of Screenwriting, La Furia
Umana, among other edited collections. He writes film reviews,
scripts, and is also a curator.

November 8th, 2019: Pao-chen Tang

Please join us on Friday, Nov 8, 2019 from 11:00am-12:30pm in Cobb 311.

We are delighted to welcome Pao-chen Tang, PhD candidate in Cinema and Media Studies & East Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. He will be presenting a draft of a dissertation chapter, titled “The Child.”

Pao-chen’s document is available for download here.

Please do not circulate without permission. Email either Sophie (sophielynch@uchicago.edu) or Tanya (tanyad@uchicago.edu) for the password.

Refreshment will be provided.

We look forward to seeing you!

Yours in Mass Cult,

Sophie and Tanya


Pao-chen Tang is a PhD candidate in the departments of Cinema and Media Studies & East Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago.

November 1st, 2019: Ayana Contreras

Please join us on Friday, Nov 1, 2019 from 11:00am-12:30pm in Cobb 311.

We are delighted to welcome Ayana Contreras, WBEZ Host/Producer and 2015 University of Chicago Arts + Public Life Resident artist. She will be presenting part of her project titled “Very Original Beings: How the Remix Model has molded Black American Fashion, Music, and Material Culture.”

 

**There is no pre-circulated paper.**

Refreshment will be provided.

We look forward to seeing you!

Yours in Mass Cult,

Sophie and Tanya


Ayana Contreras is a cultural historian, DJ and archivist. An avid collector of vintage vinyl records, she hosts the Reclaimed Soul program on WBEZ and Vocalo Radio in Chicago. She is also a producer with WBEZ’s Sound Opinions which airs on 125 NPR stations. Ayana was a 2014/15 University of Chicago Arts + Public Life Artist-In-Residence, and a 2011 Artist-In-Residence at Dorchester Projects. In 2017, she received the Clementine Skinner Award by the Vivian Harsh Society, and was chosen as an Association of Independents in Radio (AIR) New Voices Scholar in 2015. She is a columnist for DownBeat, and her book on Post-Civil Rights Era cultural history in Black Chicago, titled Energy Never Dies, is forthcoming through Northwestern University Press.

October 18th, 2019: Katerina Korola

Please join us on Friday, Oct 18, 2019 from 11:00am-12:30pm in Cobb 311.

We are delighted to welcome Katerina Korola, PhD Candidate in Cinema and Media Studies & Art History at the University of Chicago. She will be presenting materials related to a first dissertation chapter, titled “Fresh Air Photography.”

Katerina’s document is available for download here.

Please do not circulate without permission. Email either Sophie (sophielynch@uchicago.edu) or Tanya (tanyad@uchicago.edu) for the password.

Refreshment will be provided.

We look forward to seeing you!

Yours in Mass Cult,

Sophie and Tanya


Katerina Korola is a PhD student pursuing a joint-degree in the Departments of Cinema and Media Studies and Art History. Interested in the nexus of ecology and media, her research focuses on set design and other forms of designed environments in early twentieth-century Germany (greenhouses, department stores, film studios, theatres, exhibition spaces). Other research interests include traditions of visionary architecture in the twentieth-century; decay and waste in postwar art and film; and the archive in contemporary art and film practices.

Oct 11, 2019 — Amy Skjerseth

Please join us on Friday, Oct 11, 2019 from 11:00am-12:30pm in Cobb 311 for the first meeting of the Mass Culture Workshop of the academic year 2019-20.

We are delighted to have Amy Skjerseth, PhD Candidate, Cinema and Media Studies, University of Chicago. She will be presenting a draft of an article titled: “Multiplying Mise-en-Scène: Lip-Sync Mash-Ups of The Night of the Hunter in Lewis Klahr’s Daylight Moon and Jean-Luc Godard’s Histoire(s) du Cinema”.

Amy’s text is available for download here.

Please do not circulate without permission. Email either Sophie (sophielynch@uchicago.edu) or Tanya (tanyad@uchicago.edu) for the password.

Refreshment will be provided.

We look forward to seeing you!

Yours in Mass Cult,

Sophie and Tanya


Multiplying Mise-en-Scène: Lip-Sync Mash-Ups of The Night of the Hunter in Lewis Klahr’s Daylight Moon and Jean-Luc Godard’s Histoire(s) du Cinema

This article draft examines how music and spectators’ embodied memories collide in the cult film The Night of the Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955) and two contemporary films that appropriate its audio-visual material. While film scholars mainly have described mise-en-scène as a visual phenomenon, I follow Michel Mourlet in redefining mise-en-scène elements as multisensory “contours” that address both characters’ and spectators’ bodies. I closely read audio-visual contours in Hunter where sonic textures trigger viewers’ haptic memories to elicit thematic and affective affiliations with the child protagonists as they escape from the evil Preacher Powell.
Then, I turn to two films that mash-up the infamous river escape sequence and lip-sync it to opposite ideological ends. Jean-Luc Godard’s Histoire(s) du Cinema 2A (1997) fetishizes Hunter’s images along with those of a young Julie Delpy as she reads Baudelaire’s “Le Voyage.” Lewis Klahr’s Daylight Moon (2012) imports Hunter‘s soundtrack record album where Laughton narrates score excerpts to create a stop-motion collage suburban crime tale. Both films rely on sound to recall multisensory experiences of childlike imagination, but where Godard amplifies animal mating calls to sexualize Delpy’s untouched feminine nature, Klahr reanimates the good versus evil battle in Hunter‘s score to entreat spectators to play with the ephemeral vestiges of memory. As pre-existing music multiplies relations between films and viewers, these cases suggest a multisensory model of mise-en-scène in which spectators hear sounds both as found objects and as haptic harbingers of memory.

Amy Skjerseth is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Cinema and Media Studies at the University of Chicago and co-organizer of the Great Lakes Association for Sound Studies. She has a B.M. in Oboe Performance from the Eastman School of Music and a B.A. and M.A. in English from University of Rochester and McGill, respectively. Her work explores gendered and technological effects of sound synchronization through the heuristic of “lip sync” in postwar media from avant-garde film to music video.