February 19 – P. Adams Sitney

Please join us on Friday, February 19 at 10:30 AM in Cobb 311 as we welcome special guest P. Adams Sitney, Professor of Visual Arts at Princeton University and author of Visionary Film, Eyes Upside Down, The Cinema of Poetry, and other books. He will be joining us to discuss the work of Stan Brakhage and Gilles Deleuze.

Refreshments will be provided.

Readings from Brakhage and Deleuze are available for download here.

Please email one of the coordinators for the password: taschroeder [at] uchicago.edu or noa [at] uchicago.edu.

**Persons with a disability who believe they may need assistance, please contact Tyler Schroeder at taschroeder [at] uchicago [dot] edu or Noa Merkin at noa [at] gmail [dot] com**

February 12 – Matt Hubbell

Please join us on Friday, February 12 at 10:30 AM in Cobb 311 as we welcome Matt Hubbell, Ph.D. candidate in Cinema and Media Studies; he will discuss “History and Gesture: The Zanzibar Films in the Shadow of May,” a dissertation chapter in progress.

Refreshments will be provided.

Matt’s paper is available for download here.

Please email one of the coordinators for the password: taschroeder [at] uchicago.edu or noa [at] uchicago.edu.

**Persons with a disability who believe they may need assistance, please contact Tyler Schroeder at taschroeder [at] uchicago [dot] edu or Noa Merkin at noa [at] gmail [dot] com**

Monday, February 8 – Amanda Shubert (Co-presentation with the Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Atlantic Cultures Workshop)

Please join Mass Culture this coming Monday afternoon for a special co-presentation with the Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Atlantic Cultures Workshop:

“‘A bright continuous flow’: Magic Lantern Phantasmagoria and Historical Fiction in A Tale of Two Cities”

Amanda Shubert
PhD Student in English, University of Chicago

XJF440660 Magic Lantern projecting a maternal scene (engraving) by English School, (19th century); Private Collection; (add.info.: A popular form of entertainment in the Victorian era, the magic lantern was a precursor to moving pictures and modern day cinema; The lantern works by projecting light through a photographic slide which then passes through a lens, is magnified and projected onto a surface; The lantern in this image is powered by an oil lamp; Lanterns were often used for trickery, in particular to create the illusion of ghosts and dead spirits;); English, out of copyright

Monday, February 8th
4:30-6 pm (please note unusual date & time)
Rosenwald 405

This paper addresses the influence of magic lantern phantasmagoria on Charles Dickens’ writing of historical fiction in A Tale of Two Cities (1859). Popularized in France by the physicist turned showman Etienne Gaspard Robert, called Robertson, at the tail end of the French Revolution, the phantasmagoria employed a catoptric machine known as a magic lantern to exhibit moving images primarily of ghosts, demons and other Gothic fare. I argue that Dickens drew on the immateriality of phantasmagorical representation, and its concomitant model of forms in a state of transfiguration, to structure his account of historical experience during the French Revolution.

Amanda’s paper is available for download here.

Please email one of the coordinators for the password: taschroeder [at] uchicago.edu or noa [at] uchicago.edu.

**Persons with a disability who believe they may need assistance, please contact Tyler Schroeder at taschroeder [at] uchicago [dot] edu or Noa Merkin at noa [at] gmail [dot] com**

February 5 – Richard Davis

Please join us on Friday, February 5 at 10:30 AM in Cobb 311 as we welcome Richard Davis, Ph.D. candidate in Cinema and Media Studies and East Asian Languages and Civilizations; he will discuss “Parody Jidai and the Monkey Man,” a dissertation chapter in progress.

Refreshments will be provided.

Richard’s paper is available for download here.

Please email one of the coordinators for the password: taschroeder [at] uchicago.edu or noa [at] uchicago.edu.

**Persons with a disability who believe they may need assistance, please contact Tyler Schroeder at taschroeder [at] uchicago [dot] edu or Noa Merkin at noa [at] gmail [dot] com**

February 29 – Jordan Schonig

Please join us on Friday, January 29 at 10:30 AM in Cobb 311 as we welcome Jordan Schonig, Ph.D. candidate in Cinema and Media Studies; he will discuss “Seeing Aspects of the Moving Camera: Lateral Movement, Twofoldness, and Framed Motion,” a dissertation chapter in progress.

Refreshments will be provided.

Jordan’s paper is available for download here.

Please email one of the coordinators for the password: taschroeder [at] uchicago.edu or noa [at] uchicago.edu.

**Persons with a disability who believe they may need assistance, please contact Tyler Schroeder at taschroeder [at] uchicago [dot] edu or Noa Merkin at noa [at] gmail [dot] com**