Andrea Ford – “Viscerality, Spirituality, and Mechanics in the Childbearing Body” – 4:30-6pm February 4, 2016 (Thu) @ Haskell 102

Medicine and Its Objects presents

Viscerality, Spirituality, and Mechanics in the Childbearing Body
Andrea Ford, University of Chicago, Anthropology
Co-Discussants:
Jenny Miao Hua, University of Chicago, Medicine and Anthropology
Camille Roussel, University of Chicago, CHD

Thursday, February 4
4:30-6:00pm
Haskell Mezzanine 102

For a copy of the paper, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

For any questions and concerns about the workshop, or if you need assistance in order to attend, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

We look forward to seeing you soon!

Eléonore Rimbault – “Killing Two Birds with One Stone” – 4:30-6pm Jan 21st, 2016 (Thu) @ Haskell 102

Medicine and Its Objects presents

Killing two birds with one stone: mandatory therapy for authors of sexual violence-s and the prevention of sex crime in France.
Eléonore Rimbault, University of Chicago, Anthropology
Discussant: Kieran Kelley, University of Chicago, Anthropology

Thursday, January 21st
4:30-6:00pm
Haskell Mezzanine 102

Abstract:
This paper considers the development of new clinical and medical practices in the early 2000s in France, after the adoption of a set of legal reforms aiming at the prevention of sexual infractions and the protection of minors. Among other provisions, the reform led to the creation of a new form of punishment for convicts condemned for sex infractions or crimes: “socio-judiciary follow-up”, which can be described as long term (up to 20 years, renewable) and mandatory therapeutic follow-up. Through an ethnographic focus on the work of therapists conducting “mandatory” therapies in the aftermath of this reform, I document how the translation of legal rulings into a ground for diagnosing transformed the professional space and the temporality of therapies and punishment. The conjunction of clinical care and punishment gave rise to a contracted temporality for clinical intervention, in which therapy (oriented by and towards the symptoms of sexual violence observed in the past) and prevention (anticipating recidivism for every patient and for patients as a group more broadly, through actuarial predictions) are always tied, leading to the emergence of new forms of diagnosing. In particular, this paper argues that the mode of diagnosing it gives rise to builds off constellations of symptoms in the ever-renewed abductive reasonings of the clinicians. This symptomatology, if essentially unstable, is nonetheless actively developing, both through the export of local nosographies into institutions that congeal these criminal-psychiatric types into stable categories (this case is documented in the paper with the example of MRI-research on pedophile brains) and by the internal development of actuarial predictive methods which are expanding the potential field of intervention of criminal-psychiatric clinicians today, from intervention with “authors of sexual violences” to intervention with “authors of violences”.

For a copy of the paper, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

For any questions and concerns about the workshop, or if you need assistance in order to attend, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

We look forward to seeing you soon!

Alec Chao Wang – “Watchful Hands” – 4:30-6pm Jan 7th, 2016 (Thu) @ Haskell 102

Medicine and Its Objects presents

Watchful Hands: The Tacit Dimension of Surgical Needling in Late Imperial Chinese Ophthalmology
Alec Chao Wang, University of Chicago, History
Discussant: Jay Schutte, University of Chicago, Anthropology

Thursday, January 7th
4:30-6:00pm
Haskell Mezzanine 102

Abstract:
This paper explores the historical transmission of a Chinese eye surgery named Jinhen bozhang (Golden-needle surgery 金針撥障), a skill of using a lancet-shaped needle to couch the cataract. As a surgical intervention in the tradition of Chinese medicine, the practice offers a unique perspective in understanding how the assumptions of mastering the embodied knowledge (esp. hand/eye coordination) were informed by texts that characterized the attempt to shape an expertise out of the structured experience of skilled practitioners. In surveying the post-Song medical literature on this method, I argue that doctors gradually related the visual knowledge of the eye to the language of touch. In emphasizing the hand/eye coordination, Ming and Qing physicians constructed a training regime designed to educate the attention of the practitioner based on the tacit knowing of the body.
The tacit dimension of surgical needling is mainly illustrated from three aspects of late imperial writings on ophthalmology. The first shows how physicians related the expression of yi (shade 翳) to the training of skilled vision, and argues that late imperial texts adopted a pragmatic approach to apply visual knowledge to surgical practice. The second aspect deals with the technical description of needling as embodied knowledge, and compares the ways in which two Qing physicians structured the surgical experience. The last focuses on the materiality of needle as extended body of the surgeon, and argues that the connoisseurship of surgical instruments reflected individual claims of expertise in comprehending the skill.

For a copy of the paper, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

For any questions and concerns about the workshop, or if you need assistance in order to attend, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

We look forward to seeing you soon!