Lisa Stevenson @ Medicine and Its Objects

Medicine and Its Objects presents…

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 4:30-6:00 PM

HASKELL 101

join

LISA STEVENSON

 (Associate Professor, Anthropology, McGill University)

to discuss

WHAT THERE IS TO FEAR

with opening comments by

CAMILLE ROUSSEL
(PhD Student, Comparative Human Development)

Abstract:

“What there is to fear” is how a taxi driver put it. That is, in different worlds “what there is to fear” shifts. It’s a dark definition of a world—a universe of possible/shared fears. For instance, in Ecuador’s Amazon, snakes are one thing there is to fear, and travelling by canoe to a community three hours down the Bobonaza river, I watched every stick to see if it would turn into a boa. But in metropolitan Quito, among Colombian refugees, other Colombians are what there is to fear: paramilitaries, decommissioned guerillas or extortionists that cross the border to exact a price—in blood, pain or money.  Yet, in therapeutic encounters several refugees I know were told they suffered from persecution anxiety and that the face of the killer they saw across the market stall was most probably just another Ecuadorean face. “Do you think I could forget the face of the man who killed my brother?” a Colombian refugee asks me accusingly. It’s as if the therapist is calling her world, a world, delineated by fear, into question. How does fear work to create and break human kinship–or what Sahlins has called the mutuality of being–and what I am calling a world? How do we understand the communicability of fear and its potential to create unliveable worlds, or worlds where there is very little mutuality of being?  How do we maintain any sense of the mutuality of being in the face of great fear?

The first part of this paper is an exploration of the way fear constitutes, or not, a world, depending on whether one’s fear are accepted as legitimate. The second part explores the use of theatrical images created collaboratively by Colombian refugees in an attempt to describe a common world.

 Please email Camille (roussel@uchicago.edu) for a copy of the paper.

For any questions and concerns about the workshop, or if you need assistance in order to attend, please contact Camille Roussel (roussel@uchicago.edu).

To subscribe to our listserv, visit: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/medicineanditsobjects

We look forward to seeing you soon!

Last Winter Quarter Workshop

Medicine and Its Objects presents…

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8, 4:30-6:00 PM

ROSENWALD 329

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MEGAN CROWLEY-MATOKA

 (Associate Professor, Medical Education/Anthropology, Northwestern University)

to discuss

THE TRAFFIC IN PAIN:

OPIOIDS, EPIDEMICS, AND THE U.S. RESURGENCE OF THE URINE DRUG SCREEN

with opening comments by

ADAM BAIM
(MD/PhD Candidate, CHSS/Pritzker School of Medicine)

 

 

Abstract:

Both chronic pain and opioid use have been named crises of epidemic proportion in the contemporary U.S., embodying competing claims about pain as a tragically urgent site of both under and over treatment.  Patient activists, newly-professionalized pain specialists, public health officials, and drug enforcement agents – among others – all wade into the fray, marshaling powerful statistics and heart-breaking stories to claim the moral and political high ground on either side of these debates.  Looming increasingly large in this contentious landscape are reports of rising numbers of overdose deaths involving prescription painkillers, statistics now wielded as a clarion call for change in pain management practice and public policy. One rapid response to that call has been a dramatically stepped-up reliance on a time-worn, rather humble form of surveillance: the urine drug screen (UDS).  This paper seeks to work outward from the embodied experience of a chronic pain patient as he lives this contemporary moment of clinical controversy and the reinvigorated role of the UDS.  Doing so serves an exploratory effort at beginning to map out some of the material and affective exchanges by which pain is rendered simultaneously problematic and profoundly productive as it is put into politically-charged and highly-profitable circulation.

 

 

Please email Camille (roussel@uchicago.edu) for a copy of the paper

 

For any questions and concerns about the workshop, or if you need assistance in order to attend, please contact Camille Roussel (roussel@uchicago.edu).

 

To subscribe to our listserv, visit: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/medicineanditsobjects

 

We look forward to seeing you soon!