Alex Moffett– “Surgical Films and Surgical Standards, 1900-1935” – 4:30-6pm May 19, 2016 (Thu) @ Haskell 102

Medicine and Its Objects presents

Alex Moffett, University of Chicago, CHSS and Medicine
Title: Surgical Films and Surgical Standards, 1900-1935.
Discussant: Sam Schulte, University of Chicago, CHSS

Thursday, May 19th
4:30-6:00pm
Haskell Mezzanine 102

For a copy of the paper, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

For any questions and concerns about the workshop, or if you need assistance in order to attend, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

We look forward to seeing you soon!

Colin Halverson– “Mutation Mutandis” – 4:30-6pm May 5, 2016 (Thu) @ Haskell 102

Medicine and Its Objects presents

Colin Halverson, University of Chicago, Anthropology
Title: Mutation Mutandis
Discussant: Jack Mullee, University of Chicago, Anthropology

Thursday, May 5th
4:30-6:00pm
Haskell Mezzanine 102

For a copy of the paper, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

For any questions and concerns about the workshop, or if you need assistance in order to attend, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

We look forward to seeing you soon!

Fred Ketchum – “Earlier is Better”: Risk and the Medical Logic of Optimization – 4:30-6pm April 7, 2016 (Thu) @ Haskell 102

Medicine and Its Objects presents

Fred Ketchum, University of Chicago, Anthropology and Medicine
Title: “Earlier is Better”: Risk and the Medical Logic of Optimization
Discussant: Colin Halverson, University of Chicago, Anthropology

Thursday, April 7th
4:30-6:00pm
Haskell Mezzanine 102

For a copy of the paper, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

For any questions and concerns about the workshop, or if you need assistance in order to attend, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

We look forward to seeing you soon!

Sam Schulte – “Animal Encounters in The Unwild or What Is It Like To Hold Down A Baby Monkey” 12pm April 1st, 2016 (Fri) SS302

Medicine and Its Objects presents

Date: April 1st, 2016
Time: 12pm-
Location: SS302

Samuel Schulte, University of Chicago, CHSS
Title: Animal Encounters in The Unwild or What Is It Like To Hold Down A Baby Monkey: On Metaphysical Excess, and ‘The Three Rs’ as Paradoxes of Authority

Co-Discussants:
Biying Ling (Conceptual and Historical Studies of Science)
Christine Fleener (Comparative Human Development)
Marshal Kramer (Anthropology)
Bill Hutchison (English)

Co-sponsored with: The Fishbein Workshop in the History of Human Sciences, Comparative Behavioral Biology, and Animal Studies

Please download the paper below:
Animal Encounters in The Unwild or What Is It Like To Hold Down A Baby Monkey- On Metaphysical Excess and The Three Rs as Paradoxes of Authority

Junko Kitanaka – “Building a Biomedical Utopia: Epidemiology and Health Screening in a Japanese Town” 4:30-6pm March 29th, 2016 (Tue) @ Haskell 315

Medicine and Its Objects presents

Title: Building a Biomedical Utopia: Epidemiology and Health Screening in a Japanese Town
Junko Kitanaka, The University of Chicago
Tuesday, March 29th, 2016

4:30-6:00pm
Haskell 315

For a copy of the paper, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

For any questions and concerns about the workshop, or if you need assistance in order to attend, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

We look forward to seeing you soon!

Chloe Silverman – “Honey Bee Health and Ordinary Illnesses” 4:30-6pm March 10, 2016 (Thu) @ Haskell 102

Medicine and Its Objects presents

Title: Honey Bee Health and Ordinary Illnesses
Chloe Silverman, Drexel University
Thursday, March 10th, 2016

Co-Discussants:
Jenny Miao Hua, University of Chicago, Medicine and Anthropology
Damien Bright, University of Chicago, Anthropology

4:30-6:00pm
Haskell 102

For a copy of the paper, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

For any questions and concerns about the workshop, or if you need assistance in order to attend, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

We look forward to seeing you soon!

 

Joseph Dumit – “An End to Mental Health Research? Global Market View” 4:30-6pm March 1, 2016 (Tue) @ Haskell 315

Medicine and Its Objects presents

Title: An End to Mental Health Research? Global Market View
Joseph Dumit, University of California Davis, Anthropology/STS

Co-Discussants:
Zhiying Ma (CHD and Anthropology)
Sam Schulte (CHSS)

Tuesday, March 1st, 2016
4:30-6:00pm
Haskell 315

For a copy of the paper, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

For any questions and concerns about the workshop, or if you need assistance in order to attend, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

We look forward to seeing you soon!

Andrea Amico – “Uncertain Genomics” – 4:30-6pm February 18, 2016 (Thu) @ Haskell 102

Medicine and Its Objects presents

Uncertain Genomics: Where Culture Meets Science in the Age of Precision Medicine
Andrea Amico, University of Chicago, Medicine and MAPSS

Thursday, February 18
4:30-6:00pm
Haskell Mezzanine 102

For a copy of the paper, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

For any questions and concerns about the workshop, or if you need assistance in order to attend, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

We look forward to seeing you soon!

Andrea Ford – “Viscerality, Spirituality, and Mechanics in the Childbearing Body” – 4:30-6pm February 4, 2016 (Thu) @ Haskell 102

Medicine and Its Objects presents

Viscerality, Spirituality, and Mechanics in the Childbearing Body
Andrea Ford, University of Chicago, Anthropology
Co-Discussants:
Jenny Miao Hua, University of Chicago, Medicine and Anthropology
Camille Roussel, University of Chicago, CHD

Thursday, February 4
4:30-6:00pm
Haskell Mezzanine 102

For a copy of the paper, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

For any questions and concerns about the workshop, or if you need assistance in order to attend, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

We look forward to seeing you soon!

Eléonore Rimbault – “Killing Two Birds with One Stone” – 4:30-6pm Jan 21st, 2016 (Thu) @ Haskell 102

Medicine and Its Objects presents

Killing two birds with one stone: mandatory therapy for authors of sexual violence-s and the prevention of sex crime in France.
Eléonore Rimbault, University of Chicago, Anthropology
Discussant: Kieran Kelley, University of Chicago, Anthropology

Thursday, January 21st
4:30-6:00pm
Haskell Mezzanine 102

Abstract:
This paper considers the development of new clinical and medical practices in the early 2000s in France, after the adoption of a set of legal reforms aiming at the prevention of sexual infractions and the protection of minors. Among other provisions, the reform led to the creation of a new form of punishment for convicts condemned for sex infractions or crimes: “socio-judiciary follow-up”, which can be described as long term (up to 20 years, renewable) and mandatory therapeutic follow-up. Through an ethnographic focus on the work of therapists conducting “mandatory” therapies in the aftermath of this reform, I document how the translation of legal rulings into a ground for diagnosing transformed the professional space and the temporality of therapies and punishment. The conjunction of clinical care and punishment gave rise to a contracted temporality for clinical intervention, in which therapy (oriented by and towards the symptoms of sexual violence observed in the past) and prevention (anticipating recidivism for every patient and for patients as a group more broadly, through actuarial predictions) are always tied, leading to the emergence of new forms of diagnosing. In particular, this paper argues that the mode of diagnosing it gives rise to builds off constellations of symptoms in the ever-renewed abductive reasonings of the clinicians. This symptomatology, if essentially unstable, is nonetheless actively developing, both through the export of local nosographies into institutions that congeal these criminal-psychiatric types into stable categories (this case is documented in the paper with the example of MRI-research on pedophile brains) and by the internal development of actuarial predictive methods which are expanding the potential field of intervention of criminal-psychiatric clinicians today, from intervention with “authors of sexual violences” to intervention with “authors of violences”.

For a copy of the paper, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

For any questions and concerns about the workshop, or if you need assistance in order to attend, please contact Hiroko Kumaki (hkumaki@uchicago.edu).

We look forward to seeing you soon!