March 1, 2017: Elizabeth Hopkins

The Music History and Theory Study Group Presents: Elizabeth Hopkins University of Chicago Electronic Voices: Science, Signification, and Mid-Century Soundscapes Wednesday, March 1, 2017 Logan 028 DOWNLOAD PAPER HERE This chapter argues that during the onset of The Space Age the affirmation of life inherent in voice and breath reflected a contemporary phenomenology of space…

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February 15, 2017: Lindsay Wright

The Music History and Theory Study Group Present: Lindsay Wright University of Chicago The Talented Tenth: Music and Uplift, 1860-1930 Wednesday, February 15, 2017 Logan 801 My dissertation, “Discourses of Musical Talent in American History, Pedagogy, and Popular Culture,” explores the concept of musical talent in American society. Of the four main chapters, the first…

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February 2, 2017: Byron Dueck

The Music History and Theory Study Group In collaboration with Ethnoise Present: Byron Dueck The Open University The Social Life of Chords Thursday, February 2, 2017 Goodspeed 205 How do musicians acknowledge and extend relationships through the sounding materials they deploy? What kinds of connections do these deployments establish, and with whom (intimates, strangers, abstract…

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February 1, 2017: John Lawrence

The Music History and Theory Study Group Present: John Lawrence University of Chicago Hearing Voices in Their Hands: Performing and Perceiving Polyphony Wednesday, February 1, 2017 Logan 801 Theorists agree that classical music is often composed of multiple simultaneous horizontal components, but not on what these components should be called, and how they should be…

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January 18, 2017: Abigail Fine

The Music History and Theory Study Group Presents: Abigail Fine University of Chicago Beethoven’s Shroud, Mozart’s Shrine: Composer-Saints and Their Followers (1870-1930) Wednesday, January 18, 2017 Logan 028 For this study group, I will deliver a mock job talk that offers a “highlights reel” of my research (an alternate format specially requested by my interviewers)….

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Winter 2016 and Call for Abstracts

The schedule for the new quarter is now live! You can view it here. We will also be opening up a call for abstracts for our annual AMS/SMT abstract workshop on January 4, 2017. The abstract deadlines for the AMS and SMT are fast approaching (Tuesday, January 17 for both societies), so our meeting can…

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November 30: Thomas Christensen

Thomas Christensen University of Chicago Tonality in France c. 1860: Scales, Skulls and Sanskrit Wednesday, November 30, 2016 Logan 802 Download the Chapter Here Beginning with the earliest orientalist preclusions of Villoteau, Thomas Christensen traces the influence of this early comparative musicology on the theories and music of François-Joseph Fétis. Through this lens, we follow…

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November 16: Rebecca Flore

The Music History and Theory Study Group Presents: Rebecca Flore University of Chicago Liminality and the Voice in the Works of Peter Ablinger Wednesday, November 16, 2016 Logan, 802 Download the Chapter Here Although not associated with the spectral music movement borne out of IRCAM, Peter Ablinger composes music that shares commonalities with spectral music….

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November 14: Axel Englund

The Music History and Theory Study Group In collaboration with the TAPS Workshop Present: Axel Englund Stockholm University Theatres of Transgression: Bondage, Fetishism and S&M in Contemporary opera Staging Monday, November 14, 2016 Logan, 801 Axel Englund is currently a Wallenberg Academy Fellow at Stockholm University, where he also earned his PhD in Literature in…

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October 19: AMS/SMT Dry Runs

This Wednesday, October 19th from 4:30-6pm, will be the second session of the Music History and Theory Study Group, featuring dry runs for the annual meetings of the American Musicological Society and Society for Music Theory. We will feature three papers: Braxton Shelley’s “‘Tuning Up’ in Contemporary Gospel Performance,” Rebecca Flore’s “Orchestrating Speech in the…

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