Be at the Forefront of Tomorrow’s Workforce

Certificate Programs in Quantum Engineering and Technology

The rapidly emerging field of quantum engineering has the power to transform cybersecurity, materials development, computing, and other research areas, but jobs within the field require specific knowledge of quantum science and engineering and their potential applications.

Companies in the communications, electronics, optics, and materials industries are examining how to quickly and effectively build a quantum-ready workforce. Many existing scientists and engineers have fundamental and domain-specific knowledge that makes them prime candidates for careers in quantum engineering and technology with only limited retraining. Companies and industry professionals from outside quantum engineering are demanding opportunities for professional development that will enable them to switch from classical to quantum industrial roles.

The University of Chicago is responding to these emerging needs by launching certificate programs in quantum engineering and technology.

Corporate group enrollment discounts are available. Contact Sayeeda Khan, Assistant Director of Enrollment Management, at shortprograms@uchicago.edu to learn more.

Upcoming Certificate:

Quantum Science and Engineering

  • Dates: April 27–30, 2020
  • Format: In-person
  • Length: 4-days
  • Location: Gleacher Center, Downtown Chicago
  • Cost: $4,000
    Early Bird Cost: $3,750
    Early bird registration deadline, March 16

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Quantum Science and Engineering Certificate Takeaways

  • Obtain a working understanding of the basic principles of quantum mechanics that are relevant to quantum technologies
  • Develop an understanding of a range of quantum technologies, including quantum computing, communication, and sensing; explore how these ideas and modalities will impact a broad set of industries both in the near and long term
  • Learn how quantum computing can be leveraged to address a range of practical computational problems; develop an appreciation for the prospects and challenges for devising new applications
  • Develop a detailed understanding of state-of-the-art quantum sensing techniques, their potential for future development, and their application to wide range of fields, including materials and device characterization
  • Explore quantum technology’s impacts on secure communication and cryptography

Future Certificates

Quantum Algorithms

Quantum Computing

Quantum Error Correction and Fault Tolerant Computing

Quantum Hardware Platforms

Quantum Materials

Quantum Networks and Encryption

Photonics

Quantum Sensing and Metrology

The certificate of completion programs are offered by the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering and will be managed by the Chicago Quantum Exchange.

Through a four-day intensive program, professionals will learn the relevant fundamentals of quantum engineering and associated quantum technologies.

Designed For

Electrical and Other Engineers

Materials Scientists

Classical Physicists

Government Scientists

Industry Leaders

About the Chicago Quantum Exchange

The Chicago Quantum Exchange is an intellectual hub and community of researchers with the common goal of advancing academic and industrial efforts in the science and engineering of quantum information. The hub aims to promote the exploration of quantum information technologies and the development of new applications.

Based at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering, the Chicago Quantum Exchange provides an avenue for collaborations, joint projects, and information exchange between members and partners. It is anchored by the University of Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and includes the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Northwestern University, and industry partners.

Learn more about the Chicago Quantum Exchange.

About the Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

The Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering (PME) integrates science and engineering to address global challenges from the molecular level up. In the University of Chicago tradition of rigorous inquiry, we ask crucial scientific questions that have real-world implications. Our work applies molecular-level science to the design of advanced devices, processes, and technologies. Organized by interdisciplinary research themes, we aim to develop solutions to urgent societal problems, such as water and energy resources, information security, and human health.

The program was established as the Institute for Molecular Engineering in 2011 by the University in partnership with Argonne National Laboratory. In 2019, in recognition of the institute’s success, impact and expansion, and the support of the Pritzker Foundation, the institute was elevated to the Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering—the first school in the nation dedicated to this emerging field.

Learn more about the Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Featured Faculty

David Awschalom

David Awschalom

David Awschalom is the Liew Family Professor in Molecular Engineering and Physics at the University of Chicago, Senior Scientist at Argonne National Laboratory, and Director of the Chicago Quantum Exchange. Professor Awschalom works in the areas of semiconductor spintronics and quantum information engineering.

Professor Awschalom’s research involves understanding and controlling the spins of electrons, ions, and nuclei in semiconductors for fundamental studies of quantum systems, as well as potential applications in computing, sensing, and communication. He received his B.Sc. in physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and his Ph.D. in experimental physics from Cornell University. Professor Awschalom was a research staff member and manager of the Nonequilibrium Physics Department at the IBM Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York. Prior to joining the Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering, he served as the Peter J. Clarke Professor and Director of the California NanoSystems Institute, and Director of the Center for Spintronics and Quantum Computation.

Liang Jiang

Liang Jiang

Liang Jiang is a Professor of Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago. He theoretically investigates quantum systems and explores various quantum applications, such as quantum sensing, quantum transduction, quantum communication, and quantum computation.

Professor Jiang’s research focuses on using quantum control and error correction to protect quantum information from decoherence to realize robust quantum information processing and he has worked on: modular quantum computation, global-scale quantum networks, room-temperature nano-magnetometer, sub-wavelength imaging, microwave-optical quantum transduction, and error-correction-assisted quantum sensing and simulation. Professor Jiang received his B.S. in physics from Caltech and his Ph.D. in physics from Harvard. Prior to joining PME, he served as Associate Professor of Applied Physics and Physics at Yale University.

Hannes Bernien

Hannes Bernien

Hannes Bernien is an Assistant Professor of Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago. He studies quantum many-body physics and quantum information processing, and seeks to develop new ways of engineering large, complex quantum systems.

Professor Bernien’s research combines techniques from quantum control and quantum optics with ultracold atoms and nanotechnology in order to develop new ways of engineering large, fully controlled quantum systems for quantum information processing, quantum simulation and quantum networks. He earned his M.Sc. in physics from Hannover University in Germany and his Ph.D. in physics from Technical University Delft, the Netherlands.

Alex High

Alex High

Alex High is an Assistant Professor of Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago. He studies quantum and optical science and explores new physics and technologies that emerge when quantum systems are engineered at the nanoscale level.

Professor High’s lab explores new methods to craft interactions between photons and solid state systems. By doing so, the High lab seeks fundamentally modify materials, for instance by breaking time-reversal symmetry or inducing long range coherence, and create deterministic, coherent interactions between single photons and quantum states. He received his B.A. in physics from the University of Pennsylvania and his Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, San Diego.

Peter Maurer

Peter Maurer

Peter Maurer is an Assistant Professor of Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago. He studies the development of novel nanoscale quantum sensing and imaging techniques.

Professor Mauer’s research focuses on applying emerging quantum imaging and sensing modalities that enable the investigation of biological systems that are not accessible by conventional techniques. He received his M.Sc. in physics at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University.

Shuolong Yang

Shuolong Yang

Shuolong Yang is an Assistant Professor of Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago. He studies the quantum phenomena emerging at material interfaces, such as interfacial superconductivity and topological orders.

Professor Yang’s research utilizes molecular beam epitaxy to engineer quantum materials layer-by-layer and characterizes the electronic properties of these materials using equilibrium and non-equilibrium photoemission spectroscopies. He received his B.S. in physics and his Ph.D. in applied physics from Stanford University.

Cancellation Policy

The Chicago Quantum Exchange is an intellectual hub and community of researchers with the common goal of advancing academic and industrial efforts in the science and engineering of quantum information. The hub aims to promote the exploration of quantum information technologies and the development of new applications.

Based at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering, the Chicago Quantum Exchange provides an avenue for collaborations, joint projects, and information exchange between members and partners. It is anchored by the University of Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and includes the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Northwestern University, and industry partners.

Learn more about the Chicago Quantum Exchange.

Join the quantum-ready workforce of tomorrow.