STEW Autumn 2017 Schedule

Hi Everyone,
This 2017-18 academic year chairs for STEW and Placement are Professors Kimberley Kay Hoang and Xi Song. As a third-year Ph.D. student, I am excited to be the graduate student coordinator. Please email me at “Winnie Tong <wintong@uchicago.edu>” for scheduling and website feedback.

2017-18 Academic Year Schedule for STEW and Placement

All events will run on Mondays from 12:30 – 2:00pm, Room Location TBD

(updated 9.27.17 by Winnie Tong)

DATE PRESENTER                TITLE
September 25 Chad Borkenhagen Secret Recipes and Open Sharing in Modernist Cuisine and Mathematical Finance
October 2 Jaclyn Wong None of that Worked Out’: How Young Professionals Make Career and Family Decisions
October 9 Faculty Panel

Professors Kimberley Kay Hoang (Sociology), Robert Vargas (Sociology) and Ruben Miller (SSA)

 

Professionalization Panel: Preparing for the Job Talk
October 23 Nora Taplin Grasping for the American Dream: Racial Segregation, Residential Mobility and Homeownership
February 5

Faculty Panel

Professors Sanyu Mojola (Guest Speaker: University of Michigan, and University of Chicago alumni) and Robert Vargas (Sociology)

Professionalization Panel: “Mixed Methods Dissertations”
February 19 Guest Speaker 

Professor Jennifer Carlson (Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Arizona)

June 1: Graduate Student Mini Job Talk Symposium

Erin McDonnell at the Social Theory and Evidence Workshop–Interstitial Bureaucracy: How high institutional variation affects organization characteristics of effective public sector agencies in Ghana

The Social Theory and Evidence Workshop presents:

Interstitial Bureaucracy: How high institutional variation affects organization characteristics of effective public sector agencies in Ghana

Erin McDonnell
Kellogg Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Notre Dame
TODAY, February 29, 12:00-1:20 PM

*Paper for the talk is sent out to students and faculty on the Sociology listserv. If you are a University member and need a copy of the paper, please email Antoine.
Please come early for catered lunch by Pockets Hyde Park.
Vegans and Vegetarians welcome.

For further inquiries or if you require assistance to attend the event, please contact Antoine Jones at antoinej (at) uchicago.edu.

Erin McDonnell at the Social Theory and Evidence Workshop–Interstitial Bureaucracy: How high institutional variation affects organization characteristics of effective public sector agencies in Ghana

The Social Theory and Evidence Workshop presents:

Interstitial Bureaucracy: How high institutional variation affects organization characteristics of effective public sector agencies in Ghana

Erin McDonnell
Kellogg Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Notre Dame
Monday, February 29, 12:00-1:20 PM

*Paper for the talk is sent out to students and faculty on the Sociology listserv. If you are a University member and need a copy of the paper, please email Antoine.
Please come early for catered lunch by Pockets Hyde Park.
Vegans and Vegetarians welcome.

For further inquiries or if you require assistance to attend the event, please contact Antoine Jones at antoinej (at) uchicago.edu.

Erin McDonnell (U. of Notre Dame) at S.T.E.W.: Interstitial Bureaucracy: How high institutional variation affects organization characteristics of effective public sector agencies in Ghana

The Social Theory and Evidence Workshop presents:

Interstitial Bureaucracy: How high institutional variation affects organization characteristics of effective public sector agencies in Ghana

Erin McDonnell
Kellogg Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Notre Dame

Monday, February 29, 12:00-1:20 PM

*Social Sciences 401*

Please come early for refreshments. Vegans and Vegetarians welcome.

For further inquiries or if you require assistance to attend the event, please contact Antoine Jones at antoinej (at) uchicago.edu.

Notre Dame’s Erin McDonnell visits the Soc Dept 2/29-INFO for FACULTY and STUDENTS

Hey All,

The University of Notre Dame’s Erin McDonnell (Kellogg Asst. Professor of Sociology) will be visiting the Sociology Department on Monday February 29. Erin will present a chapter of her upcoming book at STEW at 12 PM noon in SS-401 (her talk is titled Interstitial Bureaucracy: How high institutional variation affects organization characteristics of effective public sector agencies in Ghana ).

For Students: While catered lunch will be provided for the event, we would like to organize a post-talk coffee/tea for those of you who may share Erin’s research interests (Governance, state administration, international comparative sociology, development, elite migration, and classical social theory) and/or areas of study (Comparative / Historical Sociology, Social Movements / Political Sociology, Stratification and Inequality, Theory, Work, Economy and Organization). Please let me know at antoinej@uchicago.edu if any of you are interested (scheduled time for the coffee will be 1:30-2:50).

For Faculty: Kimberly and Cheol-Sung are organizing a faculty dinner for the evening of 2/29. If you are interested in joining them, please either let me know or talk to Kimberly and Cheol-Sung directly.

About Erin McDonnell:

Erin McDonnell (Ph.D. Sociology, Northwestern University) is a Kellogg Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Notre Dame. She is a theorist whose research engages Organizational, Political, Cultural, and Economic Sociology. Her work focuses on how social organization affects economic outcomes, from consumer groups to administrative capacity in African states. She recently published “Budgetary Units: A Weberian Approach to Consumption” in The American Journal of Sociology. This article rethinks organization within consumption, arguing that orienting research toward the analysis of budgetary units makes visible more general social patterns of consumption across diverse contexts. Other current work takes a sociological approach to examining the historical changes and group dynamics patterning notions of fairness in market pricing behaviors.

Her current work on state capacity and development in Africa observes that states have a high degree of internal variation in their administrative capacities and organizational cultures. This has led to two lines of inquiry in her current book project. First, what explains the emergence of effective bureaucratic practice? She finds that even in conventionally identified “weak states”, effective, quasi-meritocratic, Weberian-style bureaucracy flourishes in “interstices”— relatively distinct niches embedded within dominant patronage and patrimonial institutions. Her ethnographic work in the economic sector of the Ghanaian state reveal how such interstitial bureaucratic cultures not just emerge but protect themselves from an environment hostile to such reforms. Second, what are the consequences of such internal variation of bureaucratic practice?  McDonnell’s mixed-methods approach to analyzing the causes and consequences of this internal variation in bureaucratic quality, from statistical analysis, interviews, participant observation, and comparative historical methods, paints a rich portrait of the birth of bureaucracy in African states.

Any questions, please let me know!

Prof. Alex Preda at STEW-Details

Professor Alex Preda (King’s College London) will be visiting the Social Theory and Evidence Workshop this Monday May 11 at 12 Noon in the Albion Small Room (SS-305) in the Social Sciences Building. Alex will be presenting a chapter of his upcoming book Noise. Living and Trading in Electronic Finance (currently under review with the University of Chicago Press). A PDF of the chapter to be reviewed is available to those folks with a UChicago e-mail address; just email me (Antoine) to ask for a copy.

Alex will be be at STEW at the noon hour on Monday. After the workshop, Alex will hang around to talk more about his work to those who are interested.

On Tuesday May 12, Alex will also be having a sit-down discussion of his work in Karin Knorr-Cetina’s Maverick Markets Class, which is located in Haskell Hall Room 315. This class starts at 9:00 AM but Alex will present after the 10 o’clock hour. If by chance you are unable to attend STEW or you want to hear more details about his work, Professor Cetina invites you to come by!

Thanks to everyone who continues to make STEW the premier workshop at the University of Chicago!

-Antoine

 

The Social Theory and Evidence Workshop presents:

“Competition and Spectacle in Electronic Finance” – Book Chapter Discussion from the upcoming Noise. Living and Trading in Electronic Finance which has been submitted to the UChicago Press.

Alex Preda, Professor of Accounting, Accountability and Financial Management,
Kings College London

Monday, May 11, 12:00 – 1:20 PM

*Social Sciences 305: Albion Small Room*

Abstract: 
The financial economics literature (and not only) is replete with arguments about the benefits of competition in markets: indeed, the very notion of market efficiency rests on the idea of competition. Yet, one observable paradox in electronic finance is that retail traders do not compete against each other, as the counterparty is always the broker. Additional quantitative evidence suggests that traders prefer imitation to competition. At the same time, financial institutions go to great lengths in organizing trading competitions performed in front of audiences. What does it mean to compete in financial transactions? I investigate this question at the level of the interaction order: drawing on the work of Erving Goffman and Georg Simmel, and anchoring the argument in ethnographic work, I argue that competitions are staged as a means of solving a series of moral issues critical with respect to financial transactions. Competitions appear thus to be less the “natural” modus operandi of markets than a carefully orchestrated way of providing visible, if temporary solutions to the moral problems raised by transactions.

 

About Alex:
Alex Preda is a sociologist at King’s College London, with a strong interest in the sociology of finance. He has recently finished a book on Noise. Living and Trading in Electronic Finance, which he has submitted to the University of Chicago Press. His current interest is quantitative ethnography, understood as the quantitative investigation of very large sets of naturally produced data. He works with his PhD students on “Facebook finance”, using such datasets.

Please come early for lunch and refreshments. Vegans and Vegetarians welcome. 

For further inquiries or if you require assistance to attend the event, please contact Antoine Jones at antoinej (at) uchicago.edu.

Special guest Alex Preda at the Social Theory and Evidence Workshop

The Social Theory and Evidence Workshop presents:

“Competition and Spectacle in Electronic Finance” – Book Chapter Discussion from the upcoming Noise. Living and Trading in Electronic Finance which has been submitted to the UChicago Press.

Alex Preda, Professor of Accounting, Accountability and Financial Management,
Kings College London

Monday, May 11, 12:00 – 1:20 PM

*Social Sciences 305: Albion Small Room*

Abstract: 
The financial economics literature (and not only) is replete with arguments about the benefits of competition in markets: indeed, the very notion of market efficiency rests on the idea of competition. Yet, one observable paradox in electronic finance is that retail traders do not compete against each other, as the counterparty is always the broker. Additional quantitative evidence suggests that traders prefer imitation to competition. At the same time, financial institutions go to great lengths in organizing trading competitions performed in front of audiences. What does it mean to compete in financial transactions? I investigate this question at the level of the interaction order: drawing on the work of Erving Goffman and Georg Simmel, and anchoring the argument in ethnographic work, I argue that competitions are staged as a means of solving a series of moral issues critical with respect to financial transactions. Competitions appear thus to be less the “natural” modus operandi of markets than a carefully orchestrated way of providing visible, if temporary solutions to the moral problems raised by transactions.

 

About Alex:
Alex Preda is a sociologist at King’s College London, with a strong interest in the sociology of finance. He has recently finished a book on Noise. Living and Trading in Electronic Finance, which he has submitted to the University of Chicago Press. His current interest is quantitative ethnography, understood as the quantitative investigation of very large sets of naturally produced data. He works with his PhD students on “Facebook finance”, using such datasets.

Please come early for lunch and refreshments. Vegans and Vegetarians welcome. 

For further inquiries or if you require assistance to attend the event, please contact Antoine Jones at antoinej (at) uchicago.edu.

Fabio Rojas & Brayden King at the Social Theory and Evidence Workshop: Discussing Online Sociology

The Social Theory and Evidence Workshop presents:

Discussing Online Sociology with

Fabio Rojas, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Indiana University

and

Brayden King, Associate Professor of Management and Organization,                     Kellogg School of Management

Monday, February 17th, 12:00 – 1:10 PM

*Stuart 105*

Sandra Levitsky at the Social Theory and Evidence Workshop: “The Construction of Political Claims to American Health Care Entitlements”

The Social Theory and Evidence Workshop presents:

“’What Rights?’: The Construction of Political Claims to American Health Care Entitlements

Sandra Levitsky, Assistant Professor, University of Michigan Dept. of Sociology

Monday, May 6th

12:00-1:10 p.m.

For further inquiries or if you need assistance to attend, please contact Katie Hendricks at kahen@uchicago.edu