Faculty Advisory Committee

Chair

Katherine Kinzler

Katherine Kinzler

Professor; Chair, Psychology

Katherine D. Kinzler is a Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychology in the Division of the Social Sciences at the University of Chicago. She first joined the University of Chicago faculty in 2008 as a Neubauer Family Assistant Professor. She spent 2015-2019 at Cornell, where she was most recently Chair of the Department of Psychology. Her research sits at the intersection of developmental and social psychology. Her work focuses on the origins of prejudice and ingroup/outgroup thinking, with an emphasis on understanding how language and accent mark social groups. Her research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health and the John Templeton Foundation. Her work has appeared regularly in the New York Times and other media outlets, and she was named a “Young Scientist,” one of 50 scientists under age 40 recognized by the World Economic Forum. Her first book, How You Say It (2020), is geared toward a general audience.

Committee

Paul Cheney

Paul Cheney

Professor, History

Paul Cheney is a professor in the Department of History. His research focuses primarily on old regime France and its colonial empire, though the unifying element of Cheney’s work is an interest in early modern capitalism, and in particular the problem of how modern social and political forms gestated within traditional society. Old regime France serves as an excellent case study in this problem because of the way in which it combined real economic dynamism with deep-seated political and social impediments to growth. He addresses France’s integration into a globalized early modern economy in a methodology diverse way, drawing on intellectual, economic, and social history.

Julie Chu

Julie Chu

Associate Professor, Anthropology

Julie Y. Chu is a sociocultural anthropologist with interests in mobility and migration, economy and value, ritual life, material culture, media and technology, and state regulatory regimes. Her book, Cosmologies of Credit: Transnational Mobility and the Politics of Destination in China (Duke University Press, 2010), received the 2011 Sharon Stephens Prize from the American Ethnological Society and the 2012 Clifford Geertz Prize from the Society for the Anthropology of Religion. Her current writing project is entitled The Hinge of Time: Infrastructure and Chronopolitics at China’s Global Edge. Based on three years of fieldwork largely among Chinese customs inspectors and transnational migrant couriers, this work will analyze the various infrastructures in place (legal-rational, financial, cosmic, piratical) for managing the temporal intensities and rhythms of people and things on the move between Southern China and the United States.

Elisabeth Clemens

Elisabeth Clemens

Professor, Sociology

Elisabeth S. Clemens (A.M. 1985, Ph.D 1990) is the William Rainey Harper Distinguished Service Professor of Sociology. Her research explores the role of social movements and organizational innovation in political change. Clemens’ first book, The People’s Lobby: Organizational Innovation and the Rise of Interest Group Politics in the United States, 1890-1925 (Chicago, 1997) received best book awards in both organizational sociology (1998) and political sociology (1999). She is also co-editor of Private Action and the Public Good (Yale, 1998), Remaking Modernity: Politics, History and Sociology (Duke, 2005), Politics and Partnerships: Voluntary Associations in America’s Past and Present (Chicago, 2010; winner of the 2012 Virginia Hodgkinson Research Prize from ARNOVA), and the journal Studies in American Political Development. She is now completing Civic Nation which traces the tense but powerful entanglements of benevolence and liberalism in the development of the American nation-state.

Ali Hortaçsu

Ali Hortaçsu

Ralph and Mary Otis Isham Professor, Economics

Ali Hortaçsu is the Ralph and Mary Otis Isham Professor in Economics. His research focuses on empirically assessing the efficiency of markets. Utilizing micro-level data from markets, Hortaçsu estimates preference and technology parameters that rationalize individual behavior, and then simulates the parametrized behavior under a slew of alternative market rules to arrive at improved market designs. Hortaçsu has applied this framework to many market settings including financial markets, energy markets, and the internet, and a variety of market clearing mechanisms, including auctions, matching, and costly search.

Micere Keels

Micere Keels

Associate Professor, Comparative Human Development

Micere Keels is an Associate Professor in the Department of Comparative Human Development. Professor Keels’ principal research interests concern issues of race-ethnicity, inequality, poverty, and the integration of quantitative and qualitative methods. Her research centers on understanding children’s development in context. Her CPS-TREP Collaboration Project works to develop the individual and organizational capacity of educators and schools serving children growing up in neighborhoods that have high levels of toxic stress, such as violent crime, concentrated poverty, concentrated foster care involvement, and housing instability.

Greg Norman

Greg Norman

Associate Professor, Psychology

Greg J. Norman is an Assistant Professor of Psychology with a secondary appointment in Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience. His research focuses on understanding the physiological processes underlying the relationship between social interaction and health outcomes using both animal models and human participants.

Eric Oliver

Eric Oliver

Professor, Political Science

Eric Oliver is Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago. His current research examines why people believe in conspiracy theories, why liberals and conservatives name their children differently, why the United States’ 2016 was a populist election, and what is happening to America’s democracy. Discussions of his research is found in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, the Atlantic, the Pacific Standard, and Scientific American. His books include Democracy in Suburbia (Princeton University Press, 2001), Fat Politics: the Real Story Behind America’s Obesity Epidemic (Oxford University Press 2005), The Paradoxes of Integration: Race, Neighborhood, and Civic Life in Multi-ethnic America (University of Chicago Press, 2010), Local Elections and the Politics of Small Scale Democracy (Princeton University Press 2012), and Enchanted America (University of Chicago Press, 2018).

Former Committee Members:

Jennifer Pitts (2019-20)
Professor, Political Science

Kathleen Cagney (Chair, 2017-20)
Professor, Sociology

Boaz Keysar (2017-19)
Professor, Psychology

Kaushik Sunder Rajan (2017-19)
Professor, Anthropology

Guanglei Hong (2017-19)
Professor, Comparative Human Development

Sanjog Misra (2017-19)
Professor, Booth School of Business

Brodwyn Fischer (2017-18)
Professor, History; Director, Center for Latin American Studies

Maggie Penn (2017-18)
Professor, Political Science