Social Work & Criminal Justice

Gender and Sexuality

A – I

Elizabeth Allen

Email: eallensocialphd@gmail.com

Website: http://www.drelizabethallen.org/

I bring more than 25 years of clinical experience with justice-involved women and other marginalized groups. I am tenaciously committed to smart decarceration research, policy, and practice and throughout my career aimed to embrace what academia together with activism can offer change-agents and guide and support radical social change.

My dissertation research was an inquiry into redemptive narratives and the distance process for justIce-involved women with the goal of adding to the knowledge base of desistance, advocating for policies and interventions that support the process of distance and promoting a unifying framework to bridge micro and macro approaches with vulnerable and marginalized populations. Currently, I am a PI on a CBPR project using Photovoice with the urban youth with the lived experience of parental incarceration.

The synthesis of my clinical and research experience prepares me for the dual role of researcher and policy-maker and utilizing evidence to advance policy and practice. My research interests are vast and include the intersection of micro and macro issues amplified within criminal justice systems including racial, gender and economic justice and human rights.

Kimberly A. Bender, Denver University

PROFESSOR, ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR DOCTORAL EDUCATION, DENVER UNIVERSITY

Email: kimberly.bender@du.edu

Website: https://socialwork.du.edu/about/gssw-directory/kimberly-ann-bender 

Professor Kimberly Bender serves as Associate Dean for Doctoral Education. Her recent research includes a study of gender-specific pathways from childhood maltreatment to juvenile delinquency among youth in the child welfare system. Bender’s research aims to improve services and develop empirically based interventions for adolescents at risk of problem behavior. She recently contributed to an intervention research project on methods for engaging runaway youth in substance-use treatment funded by the National Institute for Drug Abuse.

Janae Bonsu, UIC

DOCTORAL CANDIDATE

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO

Email: jbonsu2@uic.edu

Bio: I am a doctoral candidate at Jane Addams College of Social Work, activist, and restorative justice practitioner. My work is based in an intersectional and structural analysis. My current work interrogates the intersection of gender-based violence, policing, and survivor empowerment; building and sustaining models of transformative justice; and policies that directly impact incarcerated people and their families.

 

Brita Bookser, UC Berkeley

DOCTORAL CANDIDATE, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA BERKELEY

Email: britabookser@berkeley.edu

Website: https://socialwelfare.berkeley.edu/people/phd-students

Brita A. Bookser’s research interests include early care and education, education policy, carceral logics in education, feminist anti-carceral studies, womanism, and critical race theory. Her research-praxis agenda is facilitated by varied agency partnerships that explore policies and pedagogies for inclusion and civic engagement. Bookser’s qualitatively-driven mixed-method dissertation explores a typology of exclusionary discipline measures in preschools and examines how structural factors influence exclusionary tactics in early care and education settings.

 

Charlotte Lyn Bright, University of Maryland

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR AND ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR DOCTORAL AND POST-DOCTORAL EDUCATION, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Email: cbright@ssw.umaryland.edu

My research focuses on populations and services within the child welfare and juvenile justice systems, with specific interests in gender, trauma, and implementation of best practices

Rachel Casey, University of Southern Maine

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MAINE

Email: rachel.casey@maine.edu

Website: https://usm.maine.edu/swo/rachel-casey-phd-msw

Rachel earned her MSW and PhD from the School of Social Work at Virginia Commonwealth University. Rachel conducts research across methodologies to illuminate the unique experiences of incarcerated women, aiming to improve the responsiveness of mental health programs in correctional settings. Rachel is also passionate about teaching and has taught courses in research methods, human behavior in the social environment, and social justice. Regardless of subject matter, Rachel strives to engage students in dynamic learning experiences which help them develop a critical perspective and acquire essential knowledge and skills for competent, reflexive social work practice.

Dominique Courts, UCONN

GRADUATE STUDENT, UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT

Email: Dominique.Courts@uconn.edu

Website: https://ssw.uconn.edu/person/c-l-dominique-courts-ma-mft/#

After graduating from NYU with a bachelor’s degree in Applied Psychology with a concentration in Social and Cultural Analysis, Dominique Courts, MA, MFT, earned a clinical master’s degree in Human Development and Family Studies with a specialization in Marriage and Family Therapy at UCONN. Following her work as a therapist, Dominique is now a Crandall-Cordero fellow at The UCONN School of Social Work and invested in affecting change on an institutional and systems level.

As a doctoral student, she is particularly interested in using a reproductive and healing justice framework to understand the healing process for people, who live with intersecting marginalized identities, especially lesbian, gay, transgender, bisexual and queer individuals of color. The lack of visibility and research around LGBTQ people of color led her to be passionate about conducting mixed-methods and participatory action research to explore various aspects of their lived experiences. Ultimately, Dominique desires to amplify the voices of marginalized populations in her research and use collaborative and empowering research methods and accessible dissemination techniques.

Throughout the CT community, Dominique also facilitates workshops and groups focused on relationships, LGBTQ identities and other topics related to social justice and healing. She centers the lived experiences and needs of the individuals at the intersections of race, sexuality, gender and ability in her research, teaching, clinical and community work and advocacy.

Elizabeth Cramer, Virginia Commonwealth University

PROFESSOR, VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY

Email: ecramer@vcu.edu

Website: https://www.socialwork.vcu.edu/about/our-team/elizabeth-p-cramer-phd-lcsw.html

My recent scholarship has been in the area of abuse of people with disabilities. I am currently the PI on a project to make family abuse protective orders more accessible for abused persons with disabilities and to train disability service professionals to assist consumers who have experienced domestic or sexual violence. I am the co-PI on a project to provide information about healthy relationships to persons with developmental and other disabilities. I have also written about criminal justice responses to intimate partner violence.

Dana Dehart, University of South Carolina

ASSISTANT DEAN FOR RESEARCH, UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA

Email: dana.dehart@sc.edu

Website: http://cosw.sc.edu/faculty/dana-dehart

Dr. DeHart’s specialty area is violence and victimization. She has been Principal Investigator on many grants and contracts addressing issues such as victimization and survivor services, impact of incarceration on families, gendered pathways to adult and juvenile offending, mental health and substance abuse, and predatory sexual behavior. Dr. DeHart has expertise in a range of qualitative and quantitative methods and has conducted hundreds of interviews with adult and juvenile offenders, crime victims, justice professionals, and human-service providers. Dr. DeHart is experienced in needs assessment, program evaluation, scale design, and ethical research design.

Patricia Drown, Allied American University

DEAN OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE, ALLIED AMERICAN UNIVERSITY

Email: Drpattydrown@yahoo.com

Beulah Emmanuel, Academy of Prisons and Correctional Administration, India

PROFESSOR OF SOCIAL WORK, COURSE CO-ORDINATOR, ACADEMY OF PRISONS & CORRECTIONAL ADMINISRATION, INDIA

Email: beulahyesus@gmail.com

Website: www.apca.tn.nic.in

My area of interest is in teaching and research on the mental health of prison inmates. I train the Prison Officers on the various issues like human rights and issues on Women Prisoners. I do prisoners development programmes. I train the Prison Officers on soft skills too. My passion is research in Prisons. I am a certified trainer of Penal Rfeorms International and I co-ordinate the training with many national and international organisations and I was a Member of the Prison Advisory Board.

Liz Espinoza, College of Saint Rose

VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, COLLEGE OF SAINT ROSE

Email: espinozl@strose.edu

Liz Espinoza has forensic social work experience at state government level in NY.

Gina Fedock, University of Chicago

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SERVICE ADMINISTRATION

Email: gfedock@uchicago.edu

Website: https://ssa.uchicago.edu/ssascholars/g-fedock

Gina Fedock is an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Service Administration. Her work focuses on improving women’s mental health and spans the boundaries of public health, criminal justice, law, and social work. Her research includes implementing, testing, and evaluating interventions that are designed to improve the quality of women’s health in the community and within correctional settings. In addition, her work expands a trauma-informed framework of understanding and addressing women’s health needs. She integrates women’s experiences of gender-based violence, such as sexual violence and intimate partner violence, into her research. Through a human rights framework, her work incorporates advocacy for addressing social injustices in order to improve women’s health and wellbeing.

Currently, she is working on several studies, including examining women’s experiences of staff sexual misconduct in prisons and on parole and investigating racial and gender disparities in suicide attempts by prisoners. Through a faculty grant from the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights, she is investigating how human rights standards influence women’s imprisonment.

Her research is in journals such as: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse; Cognitive and Behavioral Practice; Research on Social Work Practice; Journal of Interpersonal Violence; and the Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research.

 

Carina Gallo, San Francisco State University

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, CRIMINAL JUSTICE STUDIES, SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY

Email: cgallo@sfsu.edu

Bio: My scholarship addresses historical and international trends in crime and welfare policies, with particular attention to how policies and laws intending to support underrepresented and marginalized groups have developed over the last century. I am especially interested in the “criminalization” of poverty and the penalization of vulnerable populations. One of my recent research projects examines how categories in crime policy, such as the “crime victim,” have crossed over to welfare law and policy. The study shows how new categories can change the way policy makers and practitioners conceptualize social problems, in particular, poverty and inequality.​ I’m currently working on a book exploring the roots of the Swedish victim movement. This book is vital to informing the literature how different societies have approached issues related to crime and victims.

I am also a trained social worker. Before entering academia, I worked with many different actors involved in the criminal justice system. For instance, between 2001 and 2006 I was the director of a nongovernmental victim support center, which provides services to over 500 crime victims per year.

Lauri Goldkind, Fordham University

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, FORDHAM UNIVERSITY

Email: goldkind@fordham.edu

Website: https://www.fordham.edu/info/24281/gss_full-time_faculty_profiles/11298/lauri_goldkind

Dr. Goldkind has a longstanding interest and practice background in nonprofit leadership, capacity building and organizational development. Her practice experience has been centered in the youth development, education and juvenile justice realms. Prior to joining the faculty at Fordham’s Graduate School of Social Service, she served as the Director of the Center for Alternative Sentencing and Employment Services’ (CASES) School Connection Center, a public school admissions office for youth exiting the justice system. She was instrumental in developing the Center’s operational infrastructure, including creating and maintaining all data systems and documenting the Center’s progress. She also helped craft policy and develop data management applications at Community Prep High School, a school for young people transitioning back to their communities from the juvenile justice system. Before that she held program planning and fund raising positions at agencies serving young people in New York City, including the Posse Foundation, where she was the first director of development.

​Dr. Goldkind’s current research work centers on the intersection of the juvenile justice and public education system’s impact on urban youth. She is presently conducting a national study of school social workers exploring their role in the school re-entry process of juvenile justice youth. Dr. Goldkind is also interested in domestic trafficking issues and is partnering with the Girls Education Mentoring Services (GEMS) to document their programmatic model and highlight the complex and unexplored issues of girls who are commercially sexually exploited.

Sara Goodkind, University of Pittsburgh

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

Email: sara.goodkind@pitt.edu

Website: https://www.socialwork.pitt.edu/people/sara-goodkind

Dr. Goodkind’s research and scholarship focus on marginalized youth and the inequities they experience. Much of her work examines social service programs and systems that work with young people, concentrating on young people’s experiences in educational, child welfare, and juvenile justice systems and how these systems both construct and meet the needs of the young people they serve. Dr. Goodkind developed her scholarly interests as a result of working with youth, as a teacher, mentor, facilitator, and social worker. She utilizes a critical perspective in her work to examine understandings of gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and age that shape service design and delivery and then to explore the effects of this service provision, with the aim of ensuring that interventions are culturally relevant, gender responsive, fair, and effective. Dr. Goodkind’s research also focuses on institutional biases and systemic inequities, tracing young people’s pathways through systems and providing evidence and advocacy for much-needed policy change. Much of this work is via community-based participatory research projects that engage youth as collaborators in effecting systemic change.

R. Anna Hayward, Stony Brook University
Debra Hrouda, Northeast Ohio Medical University

DIRECTOR OF PRACTICE IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION, NORTHEAST OHIO MEDICAL UNIVERSITY

Email: dhrouda@neomed.edu

Focus on the implementation of evidence-based, best, and emerging practices for people along the continuum of justice involvement.

Russ Immarigeon

EDITOR

Email: russimmarigeon@fairpoint.net

Editor of national publications on community corrections, alternatives to prison, and offender programming. Editor of 4 books on crime desistance, prisoner reentry, and women and girls in the criminal justice system. Independent researcher on the overuse of incarceration for women and others, and of cash bail in pretrial settings.

J – Z

Jalonta Jackson, Troy University

LECTURER, TROY UNIVERSITY

Email: jjackson147130@troy.edu

Developing the first Social Work and Criminal Justice course at Troy University.

Elisa Kawam

Email: ekawam@gmail.com

I have my bachelors, masters, and doctorate in social work which is my true passion. My main area of work has concerned on children, youth, and families in the areas of poverty, violence, substance use, abuse, and child welfare. Motivated by my experiences in child welfare, most of my work recently has been specific to mothers, trauma, and PTSD. Specifically, examining the mediating and moderating influences that attachment and the social environment have on family stability, trauma symptomology, and overall resiliency. I also have extensive experience in mezzo and macro aspects of social work including communities, policy, advocacy, grant writing, teaching, and research. I am an Associate Professor of social work and in my free time enjoy hiking, yoga, cooking, reading and spending time with my pets/family. Please feel free to reach out to me at anytime with questions, comments, or collaborations.

Jennifer Kenney, University of Alabama

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA

Email: jennifer.kenney@ua.edu

Website: https://cj.ua.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/JKenneyCV_Sept15.pdf

I am primarily interested in the issues that affect adult women and their entry into the criminal justice system. The risk factors that I am currently focusing on include: trauma, substance abuse, mental health, employment, and class (SES) issues. I am also working on a project related to media consumption, fear of crime, and the attitudinal and behavioral consequences of that fear. I am an Assistant Professor at the University of Alabama in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice. In the classroom, I teach classes in the areas of: social inequality, gender and crime, victimology, and drug use and policy.

Erin Kerrison, UC Berkeley

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA BERKELEY

Email: kerrison@berkeley.edu

Website: http://socialwelfare.berkeley.edu/faculty/erin-kerrison

My research and teaching interests extend from a legal epidemiological framework, wherein law and legal institutions operate as social determinants of health. Specifically, through varied agency partnerships, my mixed-method research agenda investigates the impact that compounded structural disadvantage, concentrated poverty and state supervision has on service delivery, substance abuse, violence and other health outcomes for individuals and communities marked by criminal justice intervention.

 

Jean Kjellstrand, University of Oregon

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

Email: jeank@uoregon.edu

Website: https://education.uoregon.edu/people/faculty/jeank

Dr. Jean Kjellstrand, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Family and Human Services at the University of Oregon, focuses on parental incarceration. Specifically, she examines how parental incarceration impacts child development, and how to support children and their parents both during and after incarceration. Her goal is to create effective interventions that are affordable, acceptable, and sustainable within existing delivery systems. Before entering academics, Dr. Kjellstrand was a licensed social worker for over 15 years. During this period, she developed and coordinated several individual, group, and community interventions to support and empower children and families in high-risk circumstances.

Taryn Lindhorst, University of Washington

PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

Email: tarynlin@uw.edu

Website: http://depts.washington.edu/sswweb/faculty/facpage.php?id=17

Areas of scholarship: violence against women, domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, family violence, policy.

Caroline Long, University of Maryland

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

Email: cburry@ssw.umaryland.edu

I have a child welfare background and an ongoing interest in parental incarceration, particularly maternal incarcerated, and the children of incarcerated parents. Additionally, I have a focus on smart decarceration and alternative sentencing.

David Axlyn McLeod, University of Oklahoma

AD OF RESEARCH AND ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,  UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA, ANNE AND HENRY ZARROW SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

Email: damcleod@ou.edu 

Website: www.damcleod.com

My work has focused on forensic psychopathology and differential criminal development and has transitioned into post-traumatic growth and trauma driven purpose as a protective factor. 

Annelise Mennicke, UNC Charlotte

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHARLOTTE

Email: amennick@uncc.edu

Website: https://pages.uncc.edu/connections/people/annelise-mennicke/

I am interested in victimization histories of incarcerated men and women, how that informs domestic violence programming in prisons, and the relationship to successfully reentry.

Danielle Parrish, Baylor University Houston

PROFESSOR, BAYLOR UNIVERSITY HOUSTON CAMPUS

Email: Danielle_Parrish@baylor.edu

Website: https://www.baylor.edu/social_work/index.php?id=954327

Oluwayomi Paseda, MSW, LMSW, University of Georgia

DOCTORAL STUDENT, UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA

Email: oluwayomi@uga.edu

My research interests include reentry programs, interventions, and services for women transitioning from incarceration to the community.

Sheryl Pimlott Kubiak, Wayne State University

DEAN AT WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK, FOUNDING DIRECTOR OF THE CENTER FOR BEHAVIORAL HEALTH AND JUSTICE

Email: spk@wayne.edu

Website: https://socialwork.wayne.edu/profile/ao1692

Sheryl Kubiak is the founding Director of Wane State University’s Center for Behavioral Health and Justice (CBHJ). Her research interests are at the intersections of criminal legal system and behavioral health (mental health and substance use disorders); encompassing both individual as well as systems issues. The CBHJ employs 35 full time individuals involved in a number of various projects at over 20 jails and prisons across Michigan. Dr. Kubiak’s personal research has examined the implications of cumulative stress, PTSD and depression among women in various phases of the criminal justice system; assessed the implications of welfare reform and the child welfare system on those with convictions; analyzed the effects of PTSD on relapse and recidivism among incarcerated men and women; tested the validity and practicality of a brief mental health screening measure for use in a large metropolitan jail; assessed the effects of criminal justice funding of community-based substance abuse treatment nationally; tested interventions in prison settings and lead a statewide evaluation of mental health courts.

Kathleen M. Preble, University of Missouri

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

Email: preblek@missouri.edu

Website: http://ssw.missouri.edu/faculty_preble.html

Kathleen M. Preble, PhD, MSW focuses her areas of inquiry of human trafficking, sex work, and gender-based violence. Her research interests seek to increase our understanding of these complex phenomena leading to empowering prevention, intervention, and aftercare service delivery. Dr. Preble is an Assistant Professor at the University of Missouri Columbia School of Social Work.

 

Jennifer Roark, Utah State University

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY

Email: jennifer.roark@usu.edut

Website: https://socialwork.usu.edu/tci/people/faculty

My research interests are intimate partner abuse, sexual assault, policing, and community based research. I am dedicated to bridging the gap between university research and agency research by working with criminal justice agencies performing evaluations. ​

 

Amy Smoyer, Southern Connecticut State University

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, SOUTHERN CONNECTICUT STATE UNIVERSITY

Email: smoyera1@southernct.edu

Website: www.amysmoyer.com

My program of research examines the structural determinants of health and health disparities. Specifically, I seek to build knowledge about the lived experience of incarceration, parole, and probation in order to better understand the impact of correctional systems on individual and community health. I am particularly interested in women’s experiences with these systems. In terms of outcomes, my work has focused primarily on HIV care and prevention and food-related wellness.

Kim Stauss, University of Arkansas

PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS – SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

Email: kstauss@uark.edu

I have collaborated on the development of letter-writing program to help incarcerated parents reconnect with their children. We have completed research on this program and tried to disseminate this program in both community and departmental correctional facilities.

Carolyn Sutherby, Michigan State University

DOCTORAL CANDIDATE, MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

Email: sutherb2@msu.edu

Carolyn has been a social work adjunct professor since 2008, teaching a variety of BSW and MSW courses at four universities. She is also certified to teach the Inside Out Prison Exchange Program. Carolyn is completing her Ph.D. in Social Work at Michigan State University, and her research interests involve maternal mental health and substance use disorders, alternatives to incarceration, and the intersection of behavioral health and criminal justice.

 

Christine Toner, Fordham University
Stephen Tripodi, Florida State University

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, DOCTORAL PROGRAM DIRECTOR, FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF THE INSTITUTE FOR JUSTICE RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Email: stripodi@fsu.edu

Website: https://csw.fsu.edu/person/stephen-tripodi

Stephen Tripodi’s most recent projects include analyzing the influence of childhood victimization on adult mental health/substance use problems for incarcerated women and ultimately researching its relationship with recidivism. Stephen has recently completed a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of Seeking Safety with women prisoners on PTSD symptoms, depression, and cravings to use alcohol and/or drugs. Seeking Safety is a trauma-focused, cognitive-behavioral substance abuse intervention. Stephen and his interdisciplinary research team are currently writing grant proposals to expand this RCT to include several prisons and jails throughout North Carolina and Idaho.

Katherine Van Wormer, University of Northern Iowa

PROFESSOR EMIRITA OF SOCIAL WORK, UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN IOWA

Email: katherine.vanwormer@uni.edu

Website: https://csbs.uni.edu/socialwork/faculty-staff-directory/katherine-vanwormer-phd

Blog Posts:

Dr. van Wormer is the author or co-author of 15 books (not counting new editions), including Death by Domestic Violence: Preventing the Murders and the Murder-Suicides. Some of her recent books are: Confronting Oppression, Restoring Justice: From Policy Analysis to Social Action (2nd ed.) (co-authored by L .Kaplan and C. Juby) (CSWE, 2012); The Maid Narratives (LSU Press, 2012); Restorative Justice Today (SAGE, 2013); Women and the Criminal Justice System (co-authored with C. Bartollas) (Pearson, 2014); Social Welfare Policy for a Sustainable Future (SAGE, 2016), Human Behavior and the Social Environment, Micro Level and HBSE, Macro Level (Oxford University Press, 2017) and Addiction Treatment: A Strengths Perspective (4th ed.) (co-authored with D.R. Davis) (Cengage, 2018). Van Wormer is currently working on a 5th edition of Women and the Criminal Justice System.

 

Traci Wike, Virginia Commonwealth University

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY

Email: twike@vcu.edu

Website: https://www.socialwork.vcu.edu/about/our-team/traci-wike-phd.html

Traci Wike, Ph.D., has been a faculty member at the school since 2011. Her primary area of research focuses on youth experiences of violence, specifically peer-related bullying, victimization, and harassment. A central goal of her research is to identify critical factors to increase resilience and promote healthy social-emotional outcomes for children and youth, especially youth from vulnerable populations. She has conducted work on the effects of social emotional learning on children’s aggression and social competence as well as interpersonal influences on girls’ choices to engage in delinquency. In her current work, she is involved with two studies examining peer, family, and community experiences of LGBTQ+ youth and how they influence positive well-being for this population. In addition, Wike has conducted research and published in the area of evidence-based practice and evidence-supported interventions, and how they are translated into social work practice. Her teaching interests include courses in research methods, community and organizational practice, social welfare policy, and social justice. Prior to her appointment at VCU, Wike worked as a social research associate for a large, federally-funded study on child maltreatment, and also as a practitioner providing services to LGBTQ+ youth and leading trainings on issues specific to this population for community professionals.