Winter Quarter 2022 Disability Studies Workshop Schedule

DISABILITY STUDIES WORKSHOP WINTER 2022 SCHEDULE

Fridays | 2:00PM-3:20PM (CST) on Zoom (unless otherwise noted)

Mark your calendars and RSVP here!


January 28th Joint Session with The Research in Art and Visual Evidence (RAVE) Workshop
“My practice is staying alive”: Critique and care in the sculptures of Emily Barker
Brandon Sward, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Sociology, University of Chicago
This chapter focuses on two recent projects by artist Emily Barker entitled Built to Scale and Moving Parts. While in the former Barker created an immersive installation to replicate some of the embodied experiences of wheelchair users, with Moving Parts Barker converted a recreational vehicle into an accessible live-work space as a response to the ways in which ableism is embedded in the built environment, aspects of which had been previously made visible in Built to Scale. By bringing Barker into conversation with concepts like art historian Julia Bryan-Wilson’s “occupational realism,” wherein the living of life itself is presented as a work of art, and architect Yona Friedman’s “mobile architecture,” wherein buildings respond to the shifting needs of their occupants, this chapter explores how the world Barker envisions could benefit both the able and disabled and how art can provide a space to engage these collective imaginings.
Discussant: Sila Ulug, Ph.D. Student, Department of Art History, University of Chicago

February 4th
Criminalization, Medicalization, and Responsibilization: A Critical Examination of Mental “Health” in Criminal-Legal Diversion Contexts
Brianna Suslovic, Ph.D. Student, Crown Family School, University of Chicago
Mental health courts offer an alternative to incarceration that converges upon defendants with diagnosed serious mental illnesses. In doing so, their diversion programming reifies medicalizing and criminalizing discourses, reading treatable illness onto body-minds that have been construed as deviant. The discourses of recovery and health in these contexts create logics of care and recovery that often overshadow the logics of social control in these so-called problem-solving courts. Expanding upon Liat Ben-Moshe’s scholarship on incarceration through a disability lens, this conceptual paper articulates several critiques of existing norms and discourses of mental health courts. By developing a disability-informed framework for the category of serious mental illness, this paper raises questions about care, control, and discrimination in this setting. As a central organizing category for mental health courts, the label “serious mental illness” facilitates a flattening of lived experiences, forcing a predetermined narrative of illness and recovery onto individuals whose experiences of disability may not fit within that linear model. By articulating psychiatric disability as a category of analysis, this paper facilitates further exploration of institutional violence within carceral contexts such as mental health courts. The paper engages existing literature on compliance and engagement in mandated treatment to highlight the limitations of a health- or recovery-focused response to harm in these court settings. The paper closes by advancing an abolitionist model of care and responses to harm, arguing that a radical departure from existing modes of punishment and treatment is required.

Discussant: Michele Friedner, Associate Professor, Department of Comparative Human Development, University of Chicago


February 9th (Wednesday, 4:30-6 pm CST) – Joint Session with Medicine and its Object Workshop

Ethnographic Betrayals: Secrecy, Loyalty, and Sovereignty in the Field

Salih Can Açiksoz (guest speaker), Faculty UCLA, Anthropology

Defined by the global surge of the far-right and populist authoritarian leaders, our world-historical moment is flooded with discourses of betrayal. What does a global political climate pervaded by the many senses of betrayal and treason say about the practice and horizon of anthropology? In this article, I use my fieldwork with the ultranationalist disabled veterans of Turkey’s Kurdish War and post- fieldwork experiences as a window into thinking through how betrayal can help us spell out the practical, ethico-methodological, and political challenges faced by ethnographers, particularly those working on the far right. Extending the discipline’s methodological debates beyond a focus on the dyadic relation between the ethnographer and the research subjects, I show how ethnographic betrayals are circumscribed by the work of sovereignty and the law.

Discussant: Eman Elshaikh, Ph.D. Student, Department of Anthropology, University of Chicago


February 11th
TBA
Subini Annamma (guest speaker), Faculty Stanford, Education
Discussant: TBA

February 25th
Opening Hearts and Minds; Becoming a Hà Nội Sign Language Interpreter
Aron Marie, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Comparative Human Development, University of Chicago
In the few cases where the early development of sign language interpreting has been documented, the first interpreters generally have pre-existing relationships with deaf people, either through kinship  (children of deaf adults CODAs being some of the most common early interpreters), or professional ties (teachers or ministers of the deaf). However, in Hà Nội, Việt Nam, despite interpreting being in it’s very early stages, the majority of sign language interpreters have no prior connection with deaf signing people before they decide to take a sign language class. In this chapter, I detail the process of becoming an interpreter, examining the way deaf leaders recruit interpreters who can assist with their political project, opening their hearts and minds to the deaf community. I examine the process of becoming an interpreter as a deeply transformative process, whereby novice interpreters radically change their attitudes and beliefs towards deaf people and become embedded in deaf social networks, often to the point where they maintain little to no contact with hearing non-signing friends. The chapter critically investigates the forms of emotional and affective labor deaf people engage in to recruit interpreters, juxtaposing deaf and interpreters’ experience of the process. While interpreters experience the process of learning sign language as a beautiful process and talk about it in spiritual terms of duyên (karmic connection), deaf people see the process of socializing interpreters as something they have to do because they have no other options.
Discussant: Ashley Drake, Teaching Fellow, Social Sciences, University of Chicago

March 11th
“What Do We Need People With Disabilities For?”: On Neoliberal Forms of Being Needed in Russia
Svetlana Borodina (guest speaker), Mellon Teaching Fellow, Harriman Institute, Columbia University
The questions regarding why Russian society should support disability inclusion and what forms of disabled people’s participation count as markers of such inclusion reverberated throughout my fieldwork (2016-2017, Russia). Provoked by my blind interlocutors, different social groups and actors tackled these questions: blind disability-inclusion activists and their allies, abled parents of disabled children, abled and disabled educators, hospitality, and healthcare workers, among others. Some justified inclusion’s urgency by its humanitarian impulse, others by its economic promise, yet others by its potential to enrich the social altogether. In this presentation, I analyze their answers, albeit temporary and incomplete, but indicative of the growing multivocal debate about Russia’s present and future. As I juxtapose arguments, sentiments, agreements, and disagreements about how and why disabled people can and should participate, I show how this debate grows out of Russia’s postsocialist present: propelled by neoliberalism and saturated by the legacies of state socialism (Mladenov 2018). Ultimately, the inclusion debate offers a window into Russian people’s imagination about desired social change and emically valued forms of sociality.
Discussant: Zhiying Ma, Assistant Professor, Crown Family School, University of Chicago

SAVE THE DATE: Call for Papers Disability Studies Workshop Winter 2022

Dear all,

We write to you with the exciting news that after one year of hiatus, the Disability Studies workshop has returned for the 2021-22 academic year! This is a one-quarter CAS workshop that will be held in Winter Quarter 2022 on alternating Fridays from 2:00 PM – 3:20 PM (see flyer attached). Our Faculty sponsors are Michele Friedner from the Department of Comparative Human Development and Sarah Taylor from the Divinity School. This year, the workshop will be coordinated by Zihao Lin and Erika Prado.

We invite works-in-progress that theoretically engage with a disability as a category and experience. We are also open to submissions on issues that do not explicitly use the concept of disability but are closely related, such as injury or illness, studies of cognition and sense-perception, and bodily difference. The workshop would like to provide a platform for work that uses disability as a critical lens to explore wider socio-economic, cultural, and political domains.

We welcome all UChicago members including Ph.D., MAPSS, and undergraduate students and faculty as well as scholars from our neighboring universities and Chicago area community members. In previous years, our participants have come from various disciplines including English, Psychology, Comparative Human Development, Political Science, History, and Social Services Administration.

We invite submissions by graduate students, post-doctoral fellows, and faculty across departments within the University of Chicago. The workshop will be open to drafts of dissertation chapters, book chapters, journal articles, dissertation proposals, and conference papers. Alternative presentation formats such as practice job talks are also welcome.

Possible paper topics include but are not limited to:

  • Everyday life with a disability

  • Intersections of disability and other categories of experience (race, gender, sexuality, class, age)

  • Medicine, healthcare, and caregiving

  • Disability and public policy, education, pedagogy, social services

  • Disability, work, and political economy

  • Mental health and disability

  • Disability and war

  • Disability representation in media, literature, music, and the arts

  •  Disability, war, and religion

  •  Disability, legal institutions, and human rights

  • Transnational disability experiences and theories

…..

Please indicate in your submission the following:

1)     A Title

2)     A brief write-up or abstract of 200-300 words describing your work

3)     An indication of the type of submission (Article, paper, book chapter, conference paper, etc.)

Proposals can be submitted to both workshop co-coordinators, Zihao Lin (linzh@uchicago.edu) and Erika Prado (erikaprado@uchicago.edu) by 5 pm on December 17, 2021.

Please get in touch with Zihao Lin and Erika Prado if you have any questions concerning the workshop. Both of us would be happy to discuss how your work fits in with the workshop and its objectives.

DS Study Group Wed. Dec. 4th: Carsten Mildner: “Being deaf outside and beyond the networks”

Dear all, 

 
We are very happy to announce the next and final session for the autumn quarter: 
 
                                       Being deaf outside and beyond the networks
                                           Carsten Mildner 
                                               PhD Student, University of Beyreuth, Germany 
 
                                              December 4th, 12.30 to 1.50 pm 
                                            Rosenwald 318 E
 
                                                   LIGHT REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED! 
 
 
 
The presenter will be presenting a chapter from a larger dissertation titled, DEAF-DEAF- DIFFERENT. ambiguities of being deaf in Benin. Please join us for a thoughtful and engaged discussion! 
 
Following are some of the question specifically circulated by Carsten for feedback:  
  • How do you like the style of writing?
  • Is the amount of data suitable to make the points I mean to make?
  • Does it make sense to you?
  • What do you think of the ways that I refer to my data (fieldnotes, interviews, conversations…)?
 
The outline of the dissertation and the main chapter to be read before the meeting can be accessed here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1IaaOWRsl-A0J9JpxtBjaI7C_Dldjc9IH?usp=sharing

 
To receive updates about future events, subscribe to the Disability Studies Workshop listserv here: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/disstudies-reading, or check out our website: http://voices.uchicago.edu/disabilitystudies/.We are committed to making the workshop accessible; if there are accommodations that would be of use to you, please do not hesitate to contact the study group coordinators – Shruti Vaidya (shrutiv@uchicago.edu) and Sharon Seegers Marie (sharons@uchicago.edu)
 
Looking forward to seeing everyone soon! 
Shruti and Sharon 

DS Study Group Wed. Nov. 13th: Emily Wang: “Investigating Accessibility in the Writing Process with Dyslexic Adults in Higher Education”

Dear all, 


We are very happy to announce the next session for the autumn quarter: 
  Investigating Accessibility in the Writing Process with Dyslexic Adults in Higher Education
       Emily Wang 
                PhD student, Northwestern University, Technology and
Social Behavior 
                                        
               
 November 13th , 12.30- 1.50 pm
Saieh Hall, Room 141
LIGHT REFRESHMENTS WILL BE PROVIDED! 
 
 
Please join us for a warm, thoughtful and engaged discussion! 
 
Here is the abstract for the article to be read before the meeting: 
 
Writing and editing text are ubiquitous tasks in professional work. However, these activities present accessibility issues for many people with disabilities, such as individuals with dyslexia. Dyslexia is a lifelong disability characterized by frequent misspellings and reading difficulties, and is a challenging condition in the professional world where spelling and grammar mistakes matter. To better understand how dyslexia impacts the writing process in higher education, we conducted qualitative interviews and observations with 11 dyslexic adults in different academic majors. Our findings reveal how dyslexia impacts more than just spelling performance in a single user: dyslexic adults must navigate their disability experiences in an ecosystem of various assistive technologies, mainstream productivity tools, work relationships, and ableist expectations for academic writing. We contribute insights towards understanding how dyslexia is constructed as a disability in higher education and design opportunities for assistive writing tools.
 
 
 
The article, to be read before the meeting can be accessed here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1IaaOWRsl-A0J9JpxtBjaI7C_Dldjc9IH?usp=sharing

 
To receive updates about future events, subscribe to the Disability Studies Workshop listserv here: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/disstudies-reading, or check out our website: http://voices.uchicago.edu/disabilitystudies/.
 

All Disability Studies Workshop events are free and open to the public. Unless otherwise noted, events this quarter will be hosted in Saieh Hall, Room 141.  Attached is a map of Saieh Hall. Saieh Hall is wheelchair accessible and this map provides information on access features. We are committed to making the workshop accessible; if there are accommodations that would be of use to you, please do not hesitate to contact the study group coordinators – Shruti Vaidya (shrutiv@uchicago.edu) and Sharon Seegers Marie (sharons@uchicago.edu)

 
Looking forward to seeing everyone soon! 
Shruti and Sharon 

DS Study Group Wed Oct 30th: Michele Friedner: “A mother’s sense and the work of caring for a sense”

Dear all, 


We are very happy to announce the next session for the autumn quarter: 
  “A mother’s sense and the work of caring for a sense”
                    Prof.  Michele Friedner
                    Comparative Human Development, University of Chicago 
                                        
               
 October 30th, 12.30- 1.50 pm
Saieh Hall, Room 141
LIGHT REFRESHMENTS WILL BE PROVIDED! 
 
 
Please join us for a warm, thoughtful and engaged discussion! 
 
The article, to be read before the meeting can be accessed here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1IaaOWRsl-A0J9JpxtBjaI7C_Dldjc9IH?usp=sharing

 
To receive updates about future events, subscribe to the Disability Studies Workshop listserv here: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/disstudies-reading, or check out our website: http://voices.uchicago.edu/disabilitystudies/.
 

All Disability Studies Workshop events are free and open to the public. Unless otherwise noted, events this quarter will be hosted in Saieh Hall, Room 141.  Attached is a map of Saieh Hall. Saieh Hall is wheelchair accessible and this map provides information on access features. We are committed to making the workshop accessible; if there are accommodations that would be of use to you, please do not hesitate to contact the study group coordinators – Shruti Vaidya (shrutiv@uchicago.edu) and Sharon Seegers Marie (sharons@uchicago.edu)

 
Looking forward to seeing everyone soon! 
Shruti and Sharon 

DS Study Group Wed Oct 16th: Zihao Lin “Watching Your Voice is Not a Dream”

Dear all,

We are very happy to announce our first student presentation for the quarter:

“Watching Your Voice is Not a Dream”

Practicalities of Envisioning and Disabled Startuping in Southern China

Zihao Lin, PhD student, University of Chicago, CHD

Discussant: Shruti Vaidya, PhD student, University of Chicago, CHD

October 16th, 12:30-1:50

 Saieh Hall, 141

 LIGHT REFRESHMENTS WILL BE PROVIDED! 

Please join us for a warm, thoughtful and engaged discussion of this student work in progress!
The article, to be read before the meeting can be accessed here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1IaaOWRsl-A0J9JpxtBjaI7C_Dldjc9IH?usp=sharing

To receive updates about future events, subscribe to the Disability Studies Workshop listserv here: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/disstudies-reading, or check out our website: https://voices.uchicago.edu/disabilitystudies/.

All Disability Studies Workshop events are free and open to the public. Unless otherwise noted, events this quarter will be hosted in Saieh Hall, Room 141.  Attached is a map of Saieh Hall. Saieh Hall is wheelchair accessible and this map provides information on access features. We are committed to making the workshop accessible; if there are accommodations that would be of use to you, please do not hesitate to contact the study group coordinators – Shruti Vaidya (shrutiv@uchicago.edu) and Sharon Seegers Marie (sharons@uchicago.edu)

Looking forward to seeing everyone soon!
Shruti and Sharon

DS Study Group, WEDNESDAY, 2nd OCT: 12.30 to 1.50. GROUP DISCUSSION ON PAIN

Dear all,

We are very happy to be back this Autumn quarter to our wonderful disability studies space. For our first session we will be discussing readings on the topic of “pain”.
We will be meeting at:  Saieh Hall, 141 and LIGHT REFRESHMENTS WILL BE PROVIDED! 
 
Following are the readings for the session: 
 1) ” Stigma, Liminality, and Chronic Pain: Mind-Body Borderlands” by Jean E. Jackson ( attached PDF with this email) 
 
2)  “Sick Woman Theory” by johanna hedva- available on this link-http://www.maskmagazine.com/not-again/struggle/sick-woman-theory
For more information or assistance, please do not hesitate to contact the study group coordinators – Shruti Vaidya (shrutiv@uchicago.edu) and Sharon Seegers Marie (sharons@uchicago.edu)
Looking forward to meeting everyone soon!
Shruti and Sharon
PS- Also attached is a map of Saieh Hall. Saieh Hall is wheelchair accessible and this map provides information on access features. Please contact us for any access questions or concerns.

AUTUMN QUARTER 2019 STUDY GROUP SCHEDULE

DISABILITY STUDIES STUDY GROUP AUTUMN SCHEDULE

12.30-1.50 p.m. in Saieh Hall 141 (unless otherwise noted)

 

Wednesday 10/2 – Informal meet and greet

Group Discussion on “Pain” based on following readings

“Stigma, Liminality, and Chronic Pain: Mind-Body Borderlands” by Jean E. Jackson

“Sick Woman Theory” by johanna hedva

 

Wednesday 10/16– Zihao Lin, PhD student, University of Chicago, CHD

“The Barrier-free Dream”. Futurity of Accessibility and Disabled Startuping in Southern China”

 

Wednesday 10/30– Prof. Michele Friedner, University of Chicago, CHD

“A mother’s sense and the work of caring for a sense”

 

Wednesday 11/13– Emily Wang, PhD student, Northwestern University, Technology and Social Behavior

“Designing Writing Tools for Professionals with Dyslexia”

 

Wednesday 11/27-Carsten Mildner, PhD student, University of Beyreuth, Germany

“Being deaf outside and beyond the networks” (Chapter from Dissertation titled- DEAF-DEAF-DIFFERENT. Ambiguities of being deaf in Benin)

 

 

JAN 15, Bess Williamson, Accessible America, Design and the Politics of Disability Rights

The UChicago Disability Studies Workshop is excited to announce our first event of Winter Quarter, co-sponsored with UChicago’s Scherer Center for the Study of American Culture!

Dr. Bess Williamson

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Accessible America:

Design and the Politics of Disability Rights

Swift Hall Common Room

Tuesday, January 15, 12:30 pm

(Please note the different time and location.)

Light lunch will be served at 12:15

In this talk, Professor Williamson will discuss her new book, Accessible America: A History of Disability and Design (NYU press, 2019), and highlight how objects of design – such as architecture, public transportation, and everyday housewares – played a key role in developing an American understanding of the rights of disabled people under the law, in the consumer marketplace, and in creative personal lives.

The Swift Hall Common Room is wheelchair-accessible and located on the first floor of Swift Hall, near the accessible entrance at the southwest corner of the building, adjacent to Bond Chapel. If there are other accommodations that would make the event more accessible to you, or if you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Matthew Borus (mgborus@uchicago.edu), Shruti Vaidya (shrutiv@uchicago.edu), or Nigel O’Hearn (ohearn@uchicago.edu).

Dec 5, 12:30: Tyler Zoanni, “Appearances of Christianity and Disability in Uganda”

The Disability Studies Workshop and the African Studies Workshop are excited to invite you to a co-sponsored workshop:

Tyler Zoanni

PhD Candidate, New York University

Department of Anthropology

Appearances of Christianity and Disability

in Uganda

With discussant Stephanie Palazzo

UChicago Dept of Comparative Human Development

Saieh Hall, Room 103

December 5th, 12:30-1:50

Light lunch will be provided

Abstract:

This paper considers how Christianity contributes to the appearance of cognitive disability in Uganda, a country with very high rates of disability and where Christian efforts provide the vast majority of disability care, housing, and advocacy. As a point of departure, I invoke Hannah Arendt’s notion of appearance as a way to thematize the importance of public display within Ugandan social life and the challenge that people with readily evident disabilities pose to Ugandan social aesthetics. The paper traces how cognitive disability disappears under the liberal logics that organize Uganda’s progressive disability laws and activism. Next, I compare the ways that Catholic and Pentecostal efforts sustain the appearance of cognitive disability, tracing their theological differences as well as their shared paternalism. My argument is quite simple: Even as Ugandan Christian paternalism in response to cognitive disability may appear deeply repugnant to a liberal vision of disability politics, it sustains a form of disability appearance that is otherwise not possible.

The article, to be read before the meeting can be accessed here: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Mjvbz_byBd8jFIaTR9Jba6r_FtkdjmgT

To receive updates about future events, subscribe to the Disability Studies Workshop listserv here: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/disstudies-reading, or check out our website: https://voices.uchicago.edu/disabilitystudies/.

All Disability Studies Workshop events are free and open to the public. Unless otherwise noted, events this quarter will be hosted in Saieh Hall, Room 103.  (Returning participants, please note the new location!) Saieh 103 wheelchair accessible, though for navigational purposes, please note that it is on the west side of the building, down a long hallway (with a somewhat uneven tiled surface) from the accessible front entrance. An overall campus map is available here, and one focused on accessible entrances and exits to Saieh Hall is here. We are committed to making the workshop accessible; if there are accommodations that would be of use to you, please contact mgborus@uchicago.edu or shrutiv@uchicago.edu.

Contact Zoe Berman (zberman@uchicago.edu), Shruti Vaidya (shrutiv@uchicago.edu), or Matthew Borus (mgborus@uchicago.edu) with any questions or concerns.