JAN 15, Bess Williamson, Accessible America, Design and the Politics of Disability Rights

The UChicago Disability Studies Workshop is excited to announce our first event of Winter Quarter, co-sponsored with UChicago’s Scherer Center for the Study of American Culture!

Dr. Bess Williamson

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Accessible America:

Design and the Politics of Disability Rights

Swift Hall Common Room

Tuesday, January 15, 12:30 pm

(Please note the different time and location.)

Light lunch will be served at 12:15

In this talk, Professor Williamson will discuss her new book, Accessible America: A History of Disability and Design (NYU press, 2019), and highlight how objects of design – such as architecture, public transportation, and everyday housewares – played a key role in developing an American understanding of the rights of disabled people under the law, in the consumer marketplace, and in creative personal lives.

The Swift Hall Common Room is wheelchair-accessible and located on the first floor of Swift Hall, near the accessible entrance at the southwest corner of the building, adjacent to Bond Chapel. If there are other accommodations that would make the event more accessible to you, or if you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Matthew Borus (mgborus@uchicago.edu), Shruti Vaidya (shrutiv@uchicago.edu), or Nigel O’Hearn (ohearn@uchicago.edu).

Dec 5, 12:30: Tyler Zoanni, “Appearances of Christianity and Disability in Uganda”

The Disability Studies Workshop and the African Studies Workshop are excited to invite you to a co-sponsored workshop:

Tyler Zoanni

PhD Candidate, New York University

Department of Anthropology

Appearances of Christianity and Disability

in Uganda

With discussant Stephanie Palazzo

UChicago Dept of Comparative Human Development

Saieh Hall, Room 103

December 5th, 12:30-1:50

Light lunch will be provided

Abstract:

This paper considers how Christianity contributes to the appearance of cognitive disability in Uganda, a country with very high rates of disability and where Christian efforts provide the vast majority of disability care, housing, and advocacy. As a point of departure, I invoke Hannah Arendt’s notion of appearance as a way to thematize the importance of public display within Ugandan social life and the challenge that people with readily evident disabilities pose to Ugandan social aesthetics. The paper traces how cognitive disability disappears under the liberal logics that organize Uganda’s progressive disability laws and activism. Next, I compare the ways that Catholic and Pentecostal efforts sustain the appearance of cognitive disability, tracing their theological differences as well as their shared paternalism. My argument is quite simple: Even as Ugandan Christian paternalism in response to cognitive disability may appear deeply repugnant to a liberal vision of disability politics, it sustains a form of disability appearance that is otherwise not possible.

The article, to be read before the meeting can be accessed here: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Mjvbz_byBd8jFIaTR9Jba6r_FtkdjmgT

To receive updates about future events, subscribe to the Disability Studies Workshop listserv here: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/disstudies-reading, or check out our website: http://voices.uchicago.edu/disabilitystudies/.

All Disability Studies Workshop events are free and open to the public. Unless otherwise noted, events this quarter will be hosted in Saieh Hall, Room 103.  (Returning participants, please note the new location!) Saieh 103 wheelchair accessible, though for navigational purposes, please note that it is on the west side of the building, down a long hallway (with a somewhat uneven tiled surface) from the accessible front entrance. An overall campus map is available here, and one focused on accessible entrances and exits to Saieh Hall is here. We are committed to making the workshop accessible; if there are accommodations that would be of use to you, please contact mgborus@uchicago.edu or shrutiv@uchicago.edu.

Contact Zoe Berman (zberman@uchicago.edu), Shruti Vaidya (shrutiv@uchicago.edu), or Matthew Borus (mgborus@uchicago.edu) with any questions or concerns.

Nov 14, 12:30: Chao Wang, “Reproducing Dependency: Blinded Veterans and Family Life in a Rehabilitation Camp during Wartime China, 1942-1945”

The Disability Studies Workshop is proud to present:

Chao Wang

PhD candidate, UChicago

Department of History

Reproducing Dependency: Blinded Veterans and Family Life in a Rehabilitation Camp during Wartime China, 1942-1945

Saieh Hall, Room 103

November 14th, 12:30-1:20

Light lunch will be provided. Please note the shorter-than-usual time.

Abstract: Towards the end of the War of Resistance Against Japan (1937-1945), China’s Nationalist government had established 32 rehabilitation camps in 10 provinces that housed over 70,000 military casualties. Managing this unprecedented number of wounded and disabled veterans in ways that reduced the economic burden on the wartime state became the primary goal for the national campaign to make “crippled but useful” (suican bufei) soldiers after their demobilization. Drawing from a historical sociological survey of one of the largest rehabilitation camps that housed about 500 blinded veterans and their dependents (wives, children) in Sichuan, the wartime Nationalist Great Rear Area (Dahoufang), this paper investigates how the war’s production of a sensory disability reshaped the relationship between veterans and the state. In the scheme of rehabilitation, war blindness became a corporeal asset for veterans to claim financial supports from the state as long as they followed the protocol of reconfiguring their injured body to fit the state’s demands of productivity. This included undergoing a mandatory process of training for industrial skills and written literacy, as well as participating in reclamation works in the military farms. In reality, however, the obligation of blinded veterans to support their families had driven them to engage in a variety of nonproductive and illicit activities (e.g. singing, fortune telling, gambling, opium smuggling) that deviated from the goal of rehabilitation and reproduced further dependency upon the state. Comparing the state’s remodeling of disability to fit the military-industrial system with individual investments in disability to meet familial responsibilities, I argue that wartime rehabilitation programs failed to strengthen the link between disabled veterans and the Nationalist welfare state.

 

There is no advance reading for this presentation.  This is a work in progress, so please come prepared for a thoughtful discussion to offer Chao constructive critical feedback.

To receive updates about future events, subscribe to the Disability Studies Workshop listserv here: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/disstudies-reading, or check out our website: http://voices.uchicago.edu/disabilitystudies/.

 

All Disability Studies Workshop events are free and open to the public. Unless otherwise noted, events this quarter will be hosted in Saieh Hall, Room 103.  Saieh 103 wheelchair accessible, though for navigational purposes, please note that it is on the west side of the building, down a long hallway (with a somewhat uneven tiled surface) from the accessible front entrance. An overall campus map is available here, and one focused on accessible entrances and exits to Saieh Hall is here. We are committed to making the workshop accessible; if there are accommodations that would be of use to you, please contact mgborus@uchicago.edu or shrutiv@uchicago.edu.

 

Contact Shruti Vaidya (shrutiv@uchicago.edu) or Matthew Borus (mgborus@uchicago.edu) with any questions or concerns.

WEDNESDAY, October 24, 12:30 pm: Sharon S. Marie, “For Love or Money: Negotiating Relationality in Hà Nội Sign Language Interpreting”

DISABILITY STUDIES IS PROUD TO PRESENT: 

Sharon S. Marie

PhD candidate, UChicago

Department of Comparative Human Development

For Love or Money: Negotiating Relationality in  Nội Sign Language Interpreting

Saieh Hall, Room 103

October 24th, 12:30-1:50

Light lunch will be provided

Abstract: What does it mean to love disabled people, and what does it mean to provide services out of love? In disability studies, love has often treated critically, with scholars excavating the way claims of loving disabled people carry connotations of pity, desire to save people, or paint disabled people as an undifferentiated other. Yet in Hà Nội, Việt Nam, one of the primary expectations Deaf people have for sign language interpreters is that they demonstrate love for Deaf people. In this presentation, I explore what the imperative to love Deaf people means and the types of relationality it affords, situating love for Deaf people within other discourses of love in Việt Nam. I also examine how interpreters express love for Deaf people in changing economic conditions.

 

There is no advance reading for this presentation.  This is a work in progress, so please come prepared for a thoughtful discussion to offer Sharon constructive critical feedback.

To receive updates about future events, subscribe to the Disability Studies Workshop listserv here: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/disstudies-reading, or check out our website: http://voices.uchicago.edu/disabilitystudies/.

 

All Disability Studies Workshop events are free and open to the public. Unless otherwise noted, events this quarter will be hosted in Saieh Hall, Room 103.  (Returning participants, please note the new location!) Saieh 103 wheelchair accessible, though for navigational purposes, please note that it is on the west side of the building, down a long hallway (with a somewhat uneven tiled surface) from the accessible front entrance. An overall campus map is available here, and one focused on accessible entrances and exits to Saieh Hall is here. We are committed to making the workshop accessible; if there are accommodations that would be of use to you, please contact mgborus@uchicago.edu or shrutiv@uchicago.edu.

 

Contact Shruti Vaidya (shrutiv@uchicago.edu) or Matthew Borus (mgborus@uchicago.edu) with any questions or concerns.

Neoliberal Geographies of Disability Debtscapes: Microfinanance and Non-Normative Embodiment in India

Dr. Vandana Chaudhry

Assistant Professor of Social Work and Disability Studies

City University of New York, College of Staten Island

October 10th, 12:30-1:50

Saieh Hall, Room 103

Light lunch will be provided.

 

In this article, Dr. Chaudhry examines the contradictory effects of solidarity lending from a non-normative perspective of disability embodiment, a perspective that has remained overlooked within scholarship pertaining to microfinance in geography and social sciences more broadly. Based on a multi-year ethnographic study of World Bank disability-oriented self-help group projects in rural South India, she shows how neoliberal governmentality operates by shaping rural spatiality, sociality and disabled people’s subjectivities in the interests of the market. Foregrounding understandings of disability as a spatial-relational construct, she makes sense of disabled people’s experiences as they navigate relational landscapes imbued with financialization. Finally, Dr. Chaudhry concludes by showing how disabled people challenge financialization through disrupting the neoliberal ethics of entrepreneurial subjectivity and creating new, multi-scalar configurations of political claims, solidarities, and radical dependencies.

Fall Quarter Workshop Schedule 2018

Wednesday, October 10, 12:30 pm
Neoliberal Geographies of Disability Debtscapes
Dr. Vandana Chaudhry
Assistant Professor of Social Work and Disability Studies
City University of New York, College of Staten Island
———

Wednesday, October 24, 12:30 pm
For Love or Money: Negotiating Relationality in Ha Noi Sign Language Interpreting
Sharon Seegers Marie
PhD candidate, UChicago department of comparative human development
———

Wednesday, November 14, 12:30 pm
Reproducing Dependency: Blinded Veterans and Family Life in a Rehabilitation Camp During Wartime China, 1942-1945 
Chao Wang
PhD candidate, UChicago department of history PhD Candidate, New York University department of anthropology
———

Wednesday, December 5, time & location TBA
The Labor of Humanity: Value, Personhood, and Cognitive Disability in Urban Uganda
Tyler Zoanni
PhD Candidate, New York University department of anthropology
(Co-sponsored with the African Studies Workshop)
———

To receive updates and readings for these and other future presentations, subscribe to the Disability Studies Workshop listserv here: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/disstudies-reading, or check out our website: http://voices.uchicago.edu/disabilitystudies/.

 

All Disability Studies Workshop events are free and open to the public. Unless otherwise noted, events this quarter will be hosted in Saieh Hall, Room 103.  (Returning participants, please note the new location!) Saieh 103 wheelchair accessible, though for navigational purposes, please note that it is on the west side of the building, down a long hallway (with a somewhat uneven tiled surface) from the accessible front entrance. An overall campus map is available here, and one focused on accessible entrances and exits to Saieh Hall is here. We are committed to making the workshop accessible; if there are accommodations that would be of use to you, please contact mgborus [at] uchicago.edu or shrutiv [at] uchicago.edu.

DISABILITY STUDIES CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS!

DISABILITY  STUDIES WORKSHOP

Fall 2018

We are pleased to  announce that we have extended the deadline for proposal submissions for the Fall Quarter to 3rd October 2018. . We would be excited to hear back from you!

Please indicate in your submission the following-

1)     A Title

2)     A brief write-up or abstract of 200-300 words describing your work

3)     An indication of type of submission (Article, paper, book chapter, conference paper, etc.)

Proposals can be submitted to both the workshop co-coordinators- Matt Borus (mgborus@gmail.com) and Shruti Vaidya (shrutiv@uchicago.edu). Please get in touch with Matt  and/or Shruti if you have any questions concerning the workshop. Both of us would be happy to discuss how your work fits in with the workshop and its objectives.

Friday May 18th: Sharon Seegers “Keeping Deaf Voice in the Center: How Deaf people and Ha Noi Sign Language Interpreters Engage in Advocacy Work”

Disability Studies Study Group is pleased to present:

Keeping Deaf Voice in the Center: How Deaf people and Ha Noi Sign Language Interpreters Engage in Advocacy Work

Sharon Marie Seegers

Ph. D. Student, Department of Comparative Human Development

Friday May 18th 12:00-1:30

Rosenwald 329

“Nothing about us without us” goes the rallying cry of disability movements around the world. This mantra foregrounds that disabled peoples’ voices should be centered in self-advocacy work. Yet what does it take to craft a public deaf voice? For deaf signing people in Viet Nam (and most elsewhere in the world), having both a literal and figurative “voice” to engage in self-advocacy requires the use of sign language interpreters. This use of interpreters is often straightforwardly read as a form of dependency. Yet when interpreters and deaf people orient to the idea that deaf people should be the public face of deaf self-advocacy moments, this creates new complex forms of interdependence between deaf people and interpreters. In this presentation, I examine how deaf activists and sign language interpreters in Hanoi, Vietnam, navigate these complex interdependencies and work together to co-construct a public “deaf voice.” In particular, I focus on ways this interdependent relationship is maintained such as through the valuing of different forms of knowledge and expertise, and the tacit assumption of ethical norms of engagement. Yet I also examine, how this interdependence and co-construction are erased in front of hearing audiences, so that deaf voice can remain in the center.

There is no advanced reading for this meeting. Sharon will be giving a brief presentation of some work in progress and is very much looking forward to feedback and ideas for how to continue pursuing these themes during fieldwork next fall. Refreshments will be provided!

To receive updates about future events, subscribe to the Disability Studies Reading Group listserv here: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/disstudies-reading.

All DSSG events are free and open to the public. Unless otherwise noted, events are hosted in Rosewald 329, which is wheelchair accessible. An overall campus map is available here, and one focused on accessible entrances and exits to Rosenwald here. We are committed to making DSSG accessible; if there are accommodations that would make our events more accessible to you, please contact mgborus@uchicago.edu or sharons@uchicago.edu.

Contact Sharon Seegers (sharons@uchicago.edu) or Matt Borus (mgborus@uchicago.edu) with any questions or concerns.

Friday May 4th: Tonie Sandler “Emergency Response to People with Disabilities”

The Disability Studies Workshop is pleased to present:

“Emergency Response to People with Disabilities”

Tonie Sandler

Ph.D Student, Social Services Administration

Friday May 4th, 12:00-1:30

Rosenwald 329

Emergency first responders and clinicians frequently engage people with disabilities who are experiencing a behavioral crisis. High-profile tragedies underscore that such encounters can end poorly, even fatally, due to a myriad of preventable failures stemming from a general lack of training and understanding, unnecessary tactical force, and miscommunication or ill-advised organizational policies. Although specific successes and failures depend on specific context, police departments and other first responder agencies can prevent many tragedies by valuing de-escalation as a core principle and by imparting basic CIT time and distance principles over tactical intervention in the management of behavioral crisis.

This presentation will evaluate the current crisis intervention team (CIT) approaches widely used in the United States when responding to individuals experiencing a behavioral crisis. Next, I will draw on the case example of Chicago’s CIT to explore organizational, cultural, and policy obstacles to suggest practice implications to prevent adverse outcomes during these encounters.

There is no advanced reading for this presentation. Refreshments will be provided!

To receive updates about future events, subscribe to the Disability Studies Reading Group listserv here: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/disstudies-reading, or check out our website: http://voices.uchicago.edu/disabilitystudies/meeting-space-and-access/

All DSSG events are free and open to the public. Unless otherwise noted, events are hosted in Rosewald 329, which is wheelchair accessible. An overall campus map is available here, and one focused on accessible entrances and exits to Rosenwald here. We are committed to making DSSG accessible; if there are accommodations that would make our events more accessible to you, please contact mgborus@uchicago.edu or sharons@uchicago.edu.

Contact Sharon Seegers (sharons@uchicago.edu) or Matt Borus (mgborus@uchicago.edu) with any questions or concerns.

4/13 Stephanie Ban ‘That Noisy Mess in the East Lobby’: Physical Accessibility at Chicago-Area Universities, 1970-1990

Stephanie Ban, BA Student in History

‘That Noisy Mess in the East Lobby’: Physical Accessibility at Chicago-Area Universities, 1970-1990

Rosenwald Hall 329

April 13th, 12:00-1:30

Light lunch will be provided

This project examines the history of disabled students and disability rights activism at the University of Chicago after the passage of Section 504 but before the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and contextualizes the protest within moments of activism at other universities like Northwestern and UIC, and within the broader disability rights movement. Using the lens of the 1983 protest staged by social work student Jeff Ellis and the Ad Hoc Committee on Handicapped Access, I argue that despite Section 504 having established regulations for physical access, these were largely ignored by the University, demonstrating that access was largely a concern of affected students and their allies, and that administrators thought of disability as an individual problem to resolve, rather than a facet of societal diversity. I argue that UChicago’s attitude toward access lagged behind that of public institutions such as UIC, but that it seemed on par with Northwestern’s, exposing more reticence on the part of private universities to prioritize physical access. Private universities like UChicago and Northwestern have always been slower to act, revealing an interesting trend with implications that private universities did not conceive of the “elite” and worthy student as disabled.

The article, to be read before the meeting can be accessed here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B1d482dTkFcoUXFGZ1JzNjlnYWs?usp=sharing