Darragh Winkelman (UChicago): “Ottoman Turkish Rendering of Perso-Arabic Borrowings”

LVC is happening this Friday, February 3rd from 15:30-17:00 in Cobb Hall 107. Our own Darragh Winkelman will be presenting on some of his ongoing qualifying paper research. Please join us! Ottoman Turkish Rendering of Perso-Arabic Borrowings. Perso-Arabic borrowings are ubiquitous in many forms of Anatolian Turkish, historical and modern. While some borrowings entered gradually […]

Continue reading →

Isaac Bleaman (UC Berkeley): “Contemporary and historical perspectives on sociolinguistic variation in Yiddish”

Please join us this Friday, January 20th from 15:30-17:00 in Cobb Hall 107 for the first LVC of the winter! Prof. Isaac Bleaman will be speaking on Yiddish varieties and what they could say about differences between communities. This meeting will be both in-person and on Zoom; if you would like the Zoom link for […]

Continue reading →

Hilaria Cruz (University of Louisville): “Tonal verb inflection classes in two Eastern Chatino languages”

Please join us this Friday, Dec. 2nd from 15:30-17:00 in Rosenwald 301 for the very last LVC of the quarter! Prof. Hilaria Cruz from the University of Louisville will be presenting on tone in Chatino. Note that she will be speaking in-person, but that we will also have a Zoom link for those who can’t […]

Continue reading →

Dozandri Mendoza (UC Santa Barbara): “Feeling language in the nightclub: Proprioception in linguistic analysis and the semio-somatic vigilance of trans life”

Please join us this Friday, Nov. 18 from 15:30-17:00 in Rosenwald 301. Dozandri Mendoza from UC Santa Barbara will be presenting on the linguistics of nightlife culture as it pertains to trans people. Note that Dozandri will be speaking over Zoom, but that we will watch together in Rosenwald. If you are unable to make […]

Continue reading →

Corinne Kasper (UChicago): “L2 Potawatomi”

Last week UChicago’s own Corinne Kasper presented her ongoing dissertation work on L2 Potawatomi. Thanks to Corinne for a great talk! “L2 Potawatomi” Potawatomi is an endangered Algonquian language spoken around the Great Lakes. With fewer than a dozen fluent first language speakers, whose numbers were approximately halved during the current Covid-19 pandemic (Lewis under […]

Continue reading →

Petra Goedegebuure (UChicago): “A queen’s code-switching from Hittite to Luwian and its implications for the linguistic landscape of 13th century BCE Anatolia”

Please join us this Friday, Nov. 4, at 15:30 in Rosenwald Hall, Rm. 301 for Prof. Petra Goedegebuure’s talk on the effects of linguistic contact in ancient Anatolia and what a particular instance of code-switching might tell us about this linguistic landscape. See abstract below: “‘The people of Hatti often speak about my match!’ A […]

Continue reading →

Akshay Aitha (UChicago): “Erasure and emergence: How Telugu-ness has evolved in the American diaspora”

Please join us for the first LVC of the year this Friday, Oct. 21 from 15:30-17:00 in Rosenwald 301. Akshay Aitha will be presenting on identity among people of Telugu heritage in America. “Erasure and emergence: How Telugu-ness has evolved in the American diaspora” While caste, religion, and region are among the most important axes […]

Continue reading →

Steven Castro (UChicago): “Plural-marking strategies in Fiji-Hindi”

Please join us for the first LVC of the year this Friday, Oct. 7 from 15:30-17:00 in Rosenwald 301. Steven Castro will be presenting on ongoing linguistic changes in Fiji Hindi. “Plural-marking strategies in Fiji Hindi: The grammaticalization of log“ Grammaticalization literature has tended to focus on past or already completed instances of grammaticalization through […]

Continue reading →

Spring quarter at LVC

In light of recent epidemiological circumstances, the organizers of LVC will be suspending all workshop activities for the spring quarter. We had had a wonderful lineup of speakers planned, and we are truly disappointed to have to do this. We hope that you will join us in Fall 2020.

Continue reading →