Friday, November 16: Charles Keith, “The Daily Lives of Indochinese Migrants in Interwar France”

Charles Keith

Associate Professor of History, Michigan State University

“The Daily Lives of Indochinese Migrants in Interwar France”

Friday, November 16, 4:30-6:00 PM

Social Sciences Tea Room (SSR 201)

Discussant: Charles Fawell, PhD Candidate in History, University of Chicago

Co-sponsored with the Interdisciplinary Approaches to Modern France and the Francophone World Workshop

Thursday, October 25 (time change: 3:30-5:00): Yuanxie Shi, “Timber Rafting and Waterborne Trade: A Case Study of Zhou Family’s Business in Eastern Zhejiang”

Yuanxie Shi

PhD Student in EALC, University of Chicago

“Timber Rafting and Waterborne Trade: A Case Study of Zhou Family’s Business in Eastern Zhejiang”

Thursday, October 25, 3:30-5:00 PM

John Hope Franklin Room (SSR 224)

Discussant: Carl Kubler, PhD Candidate in History, University of Chicago

Thursday, October 11: Daniel Knorr, “War, State, and Place in Mid-Nineteenth Century China: Jinan during the Taiping and Nian”

Daniel Knorr

PhD Candidate in History, University of Chicago

“War, State, and Place in Mid-Nineteenth Century China: Jinan during the Taiping and Nian”

Thursday, October 11, 4:00-5:30 PM

John Hope Franklin Room (SSR 224)

Discussant: Stephanie M. Holmes, PhD Candidate, Department of History, University of Chicago

 

Fall 2018 EATRH Workshop Schedule

The East Asia: Transregional Histories Workshop is pleased to announce its schedule for Fall 2018. We look forward to seeing you in attendance!

Fall 2018 Schedule:

10/11  Dan Knorr, PhD Candidate in History, University of Chicago
Title: “War, State, and Place in Mid-Nineteenth Century China: Jinan during the Taiping and Nian”
4:00-5:30 PM, John Hope Franklin Room (SSR 224)

10/24  (Wednesday) Kaoru Iokibe, Professor, Graduate Schools for Law and Politics, University of Tokyo
Title: “Distance, Time, Crossroad, and Expansion: Basic Elements of Modern Japanese History”
4:00 PM, Ida Noyes Theater (3rd floor)
Co-sponsored with the Center for East Asian Studies

10/25  Yuanxie Shi, PhD Student in EALC, University of Chicago
Title: “Timber Rafting and Waterborne Trade in Late Qing and Republican China: A Case Study of the Zhou Family’s Business in Quzhou, Eastern Zhejiang”
3:30-5:00 PM, John Hope Franklin Room (SSR 224)

11/8  Jessa Dahl, PhD Candidate in History, University of Chicago
Title: “From Entrepot to Treaty Port: Nagasaki’s Networks of Transnational Exchange and the Nineteenth Century Global Order, 1859-1899”
4:00-5:30 PM, John Hope Franklin Room (SSR 224)

11/16 (Friday) Charles Keith, Professor of Vietnamese History, Michigan State University
Title: “The Daily Lives of Indochinese Migrants in Interwar France”
4:30-6:00 PM, SSR Tea Room
Co-sponsored with the Interdisciplinary Approaches to Modern France and the Francophone World Workshop

11/30  (Friday) Breakfast discussion with Glen Tiffert, Visiting Fellow, Hoover Institution
9:45-11:00 AM, Stevanovich Institute Taberna Room
Co-sponsored with the Center for East Asian Studies

12/6  Yuan Tian, PhD Student in History, University of Chicago
Title: “Death of a Journalist: Debating Legal Cruelty in Late Qing China”
4:00-5:30 PM, John Hope Franklin Room (SSR 224)

Thursday, May 31st: Elisabeth Köll “Building Railroads in early 20th-Century China: Land Acquisition, Constructions, and Management in the Context of Local Society”

Elisabeth Köll

William Payden Associate Professor of History, University of Notre Dame

“Building Railroads in early 20th-Century China: Land Acquisition, Constructions, and Management in the Context of Local Society”

Thursday, May 31st, 4:30PM-6:30PM

John Hope Franklin Room [SSR 224]

DIscussant: Matthew Lowenstein, PhD Student, Department of History, University of Chicago

Please join the East Asia: Transregional Histories Workshop in welcoming Professor Elisabeth Köll [University of Notre Dame] as she presents her paper titled “Building Railroads in early 20th-Century China: Land Acquisition, Constructions, and Management in the Context of Local Society.” Professor Köll has provided the following abstract:

China’s railroad development in the early 20th century was anchored in a semi-colonial context, framed by the political and economic motivations of foreign powers such as Great Britain, Germany, Belgium and the United States, presenting a complex political environment with challenges for the construction and management of a railroad system. As this paper will
show, the evolution of management structures, practices, and business strategies of Chinese railroad companies took shape within a business and political climate of semi-colonial intervention. One of the results was that Chinese railroads combined Western managerial styles with indigenous business practices in their institutional evolution. However, the Chinese were
hardly passive or reluctant recipients of the new technology. Based on select case studies, this paper demonstrates how the embrace of railroads by the local population was predominantly driven by a great deal of pragmatism, especially with regard to the issue of land sales.

Professor Köll’s Paper can be found in the post below.

As always, first-time attendees are welcome. Light refreshments and snacks will be served. If you have any questions or require assistance to attend, please contact Robert Burgos at rburgos@uchicago.edu or Spencer Stewart at sdstewart@uchicago.edu.