THURS. Nov. 2, ITO Miro

Thursday, November 2,  5:00 – 7:00 pm, CWAC 156

Art as Media is a Message for Universality: Road of Light and Hope: The Eurasian Trail of Wisdom (Σοφια) —between East and West

ITO Miro

Artist, author, and initiator of Media Art League

Internationally recognized artist and author ITO Miro, who has been working to promote awareness of ancient Asian/Eurasian cultural heritage and traditions preserved in Japan, will present three short films: “Great Buddha Lives!”, “Gigaku + Road of Masks”, “Life of Masks: Bugaku at Kasuga-taisha Shrine + Bugaku at Wakamiya Onmatsuri Festival” and speak about her exhibition, “Road of Light and Hope: National Treasures of Todai-ji Temple, Nara,” which features photo art hanging scrolls of ancient National Treasures of Japan and Important Cultural Properties of Japan. The exhibition runs from November 1st to 28th, 2017 at the Consulate General of Japan in Chicago.

 

Thursday, November 2,  5:00 – 7:00 pm, CWAC 156

Persons with concerns regarding accessibility please contact Nancy P. Lin (nancyplin@uchicago.edu)

Oct 27, LI Jian’an

Friday, October 27,  4:30 to 6:30pm, CWAC 156

从山林到海洋——福建古代陶瓷与海上丝绸之路

From the Mountain Forests to the Sea: Fujian Ancient Ceramics and the Maritime Silk Road

栗建安 LI Jian’an 

福建博物院文物考古研究所, 所长  Director, Institute of Cultural Relics and Archeology, Fujian Museum

*Note: This talk will be delivered in Chinese

中国东南沿海的福建在半个多世纪以来的考古工作中,发现了自商代以降尤其是历史时期的众多古窑址,出土的唐宋元明清各个朝代的各类陶瓷器,与海上丝绸之路沿线上的沉船、港市遗址所遗存的大量福建陶瓷可相互映证,因此成为海上丝绸之路的重要历史见证、研究的珍贵实物资料,也证实了福建陶瓷在早期贸易全球化进程中的重要历史地位。

Friday, October 27,  4:30 to 6:30pm, CWAC 156

Persons with concerns regarding accessibility please contact Nancy P. Lin (nancyplin@uchicago.edu)

Oct 13, GU Zheng

Friday, October 13,  4:30 to 6:30pm, CWAC 156

Between Journalism and Propaganda: The Assassination of Song Jiaoren in Minglibao

GU Zheng  顾铮

Professor and Vice-Director of the Research Center for Visual Culture, School of Journalism, Fudan University
Visiting Scholar, Harvard-Yenching Institute

*Note: This talk will be delivered in Chinese

本文尝试检视作为民国初年革命党人主要喉舌的《民立报》对于武昌起义以及之后的重大新闻事件暗杀宋教仁案的视觉处理,探讨他们如何认识照片、尤其是肖像照片在新闻报导与政治宣传中的作用与使用方式。报人与革命党人的身份的重合,使得他们对于照片的使用达到了某种空前的水准,也令新闻与宣传的边界受到挑战,这在“刺宋案”中体现得尤为明显。

This event is sponsored by the Committee on Chinese Studies at the Center for East Asian Studies with generous support from a United States Department of Education National Resource Center Title VI Grant.

Friday, October 13,  4:30 to 6:30pm, CWAC 156

Persons with concerns regarding accessibility please contact Nancy P. Lin (nancyplin@uchicago.edu)

THURS. October 5, Adrian Favell

Thursday, October 5,  5-7pm, CWAC 156

After the Tsunami: Japanese Contemporary Art since 2011

Adrian Favell

Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures, University of Leeds

 

Art collective Shibuhouse led by Saito Keita

 

What effect have the Triple Earthquake disasters of March 2011 had on Japanese contemporary art? Japanese contemporary art since the 1990s has mainly been associated with the popular culture inspired work of artists such as Murakami Takashi, Nara Yoshitomo, Mori Mariko and Aida Makoto. The rupture of 2011 however made clear a major shift in Japanese art towards more community based, socially engaged, and politically critical work, including among this older generation. While explaining the longstanding roots of socially engaged “art projects” as a distinctive feature of the Japanese art world, the talk will focus on the changing output of a younger generation of artists: particularly the rise of the art unit Chim↑Pom, and the story of three even younger Tokyo art collectives, whose work has also shifted the line between art, politics and everyday survival—Chaos★Lounge, Shibuhouse and Parplume. The talk is based on a new chapter for a forthcoming revised and updated edition (in Japanese and English) of my book, Before and After Superflat: A Short History of Japanese Contemporary Art 1990-2011 (Blue Kingfisher/DAP 2012).

 

This event is sponsored by the University of Chicago Center for East Asian Studies with support from a Title VI National Resource Center Grant from the United States Department of Education.

Thursday, October 5,  5-7pm, CWAC 156

Persons with concerns regarding accessibility please contact Nancy P. Lin (nancyplin@uchicago.edu)

Fall Schedule 2017

Visual and Material Perspectives on East Asia is proud to present our schedule for Fall 2017.

All sessions unless otherwise noted will take place on Fridays from 4:30-6:30pm in the Cochrane-Woods Art Center (CWAC) Room 156


Wang Jin, A Chinese Dream, performance by Wang Jin in 1998 at the Ming Tombs outside Beijing, photo by Shi Xiaobing

 

*Thursday, October 5, Professor Adrian Favell
Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures, University of Leeds
“After the Tsunami: Japanese Contemporary Art since 2011”
*Note: This talk will take place on Thursday from 5-7pm

*October 13, Professor GU Zheng
Vice-Director of the Research Center for Visual Culture, School of Journalism,
Fudan University | Visiting Scholar, Harvard-Yenching Institute
“Between Journalism and Propaganda: The Assassination of Song Jiaoren in Minglibao”
*Note: This talk will be delivered in Chinese

*Thursday, November 2, ITO Miro
Independent artist, author, and producer
“Art as Media is a Message for Universality: Road of Light and Hope: The Eurasian Trail of Wisdom (Σοφια) — between East and West”
*Note: This talk will take place on Thursday from 5-7pm

November 10, Boqun Zhou, Ph.D. Candidate
Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago
“The Mechanical Heart: Analogies of the Lever and Leverage in Early China”

November 17, Zhenru Zhou, Ph.D. Student
Department of Art History, University of Chicago
“A Visual Study of the Front Panel of a Tang Dynasty Buddhist Shrine”

December 1, Yifan Zou, Ph.D. Student
Department of Art History, University of Chicago
“Traditions Reinterpreted: Text and Image in Wu Zhen’s Eight Views of Jiahe (1344)”

 

We look forward to your attendance and hope you will share this with all who might also be interested in joining our community. Please direct questions and inquiries to Nancy P. Lin at nancyplin@uchicago.edu.

May 26, Yu-chih Lai

Friday, May 26,  4:30 to 6:30pm, CWAC156

Manchu Roots: Imperial Politics, Image Discourse, and European Botanical Studies at the Qianlong Court

Yu-chih Lai 賴毓芝

Associate Research Fellow, Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica

余省王幼学合作瑞树图册

In 1750, Emperor Qianlong sent the second-rank imperial bodyguard of the Qianqing Palace to organize an expedition group of up to 37 people, including a court painter, to investigate a legendary tree grown in the Changbai Mountain, the sacred cradle of the Manchu origin. This tree was said to have eight branches belonging to eight different kinds of species. After more than one hundred days of climbing and wading, this group finally reached the tree, took the precise measurements, collected its leaves, branches, and cones as the specimens and came back. Sadly, the guard died at the end of the journey.

What is special about this story is that not only Emperor Qianlong composed an imperial rhyme to commemorate the expedition and renamed the tree as “Auspicious Tree” that meant to symbolize the longevity of the empire and the Heaven’s recognition of the Manchu’s ruling, but most importantly, he emphasized the empirical approach to document the existence of this tree and proclaimed that “what I state is all documentary truth, not empty words.” At least four sets of images were produced based on the accompanying painter’s sketches from the trip. Two of them clearly have much to do with the European tradition. One is the album depicting eight kinds of leaves in a style that reminds us of the botanical illustrations using watercolors in the European tradition that flourished since the Renaissance period. The other album contains eight kinds of actual leaves, just like the album of specimens in European fashion.

Why would Emperor Qianlong be so interested in this tree and take all the effort to investigate it first-handedly? Why would the European botanical tradition be adopted in representing it? This paper intends to focus on the reconstruction of the expedition, the making of the sacred tree, and how and what role the European botanical practice played in validating the traditional auspicious politics at the Qianlong court.

Friday, May 26,  4:30 to 6:30pm, CWAC156

Persons with concerns regarding accessibility please contact Zhiyan Yang (zhiyan@uchicago.edu)

May 19, Anne Feng

Friday, May 19,  4:30 to 6:30pm, CWAC156

Facing Vulture Peak: Pivoting Perspectives of Lady Vaidehi and a Visual Culture of the Pure Land

Anne Feng

Department of Art History, University of Chicago, Ph.D. candidate

This presentation offers a new framework for understanding the figure of Lady Vaidehī, an enigmatic character who serves as the arch meditator in Pure Land practices. In the textual tradition of narratives that concern Lady Vaidehi, she appears as a figure that is surprisingly difficult to identify with; and yet, a sophisticated visual culture of the Pure Land seems to pivot around her body and her viewpoints. In this talk, I pose a set of questions that have been neglected by previous scholars: What is the significance of this female figure? What does it mean to see through her eyes? I show that, through material and pictorial scaffolding at Dunhuang, she is designed as a viewer/worshipper par excellence, and Tang painters were deeply fascinated by the Buddha’s miraculous ability to traverse space to meet with her face to face.

 Friday, May 19,  4:30 to 6:30pm, CWAC156
Persons with concerns regarding accessibility please contact  Zhiyan Yang (zhiyan@uchicago.edu)

May 12, QIN Zhen

Friday, May 12,  4:30 to 6:30pm, CWAC156

洞天:解读汉代墓葬艺术中的时空模式与象征程序

The Grotto-heaven: Interpreting the Time and space pattern and Symbolic Structure in the Art of Han Tombs

秦臻  QIN Zhen

四川美术学院 教授, Professor, Sichuan Fine Arts Institute

*This talk will be delivered in Chinese.

成都博物院藏 成都百花潭东汉墓葬出土仙山座

“洞天”与西王母、仙人六博、孝子贤臣等图像组合所描绘的仙山图像,自公元一世纪开始,逐渐取代了以鬼魅魍魉、川泽山林为主的传统山水模式。本课题以四川成都、雅安等地出土仙山座为主要研究对象,探讨“洞天”图像是如何通过图像来形成暗示、象征,表现作为另一个世界的入口或通道,并进而丰富和改变了汉代画像系统的空间关系。这种以洞穴,入口所暗示、引入的内在空间即是可供迈入不死仙境的生命转换场所。汉代的丧葬艺术通过对这种隐秘空间的丰富和建构,将现世与来世连接起来,呈现出一种具有时间性的空间表现模式和象征程序。

Friday, May 12,  4:30 to 6:30pm, CWAC156

Persons with concerns regarding accessibility please contact  Zhiyan Yang (zhiyan@uchicago.edu)

 

April 27, Namiko Kunimoto

Thursday, April 27, 4:30 to 6:30pm, CWAC156

Figuration and Dissent

Namiko Kunimoto

Assistant Professor in the Department of History of Art, Ohio State University

Katsura Yuki, Gonbe and Crow, 1966

This presentation examines the work of Katsura Yuki (1913-1991), a Tokyo-based painter and assemblage artist. Katsura enacted political resistance by representing contentious issues such as self-sacrifice in times of war, the United States Castle Bravo nuclear test, the representation of gay lovers, and the status of women in Japan. This presentation will focus specifically on her paintings from the 1930s-1960s, as well as her illustrations of the James Baldwin novel, Another Country, that were featured in the Asahi Journal in the 1960s. Katsura’s body of work evaded the overdetermined masculine heroics of abstract expressionism and action art that had taken Japan by storm in the postwar period, forging an innovative mode of expression that was whimsical and strange in its tone, but nonetheless bore a potent political thrust.

 

By experimenting with the visibility and invisibility of the body, I argue Katsura enacted what Jacques Rancière terms political “dissensus.” Rancière sees genuine art and politics as those that create new relations between the visible and the invisible, liberating bodies from their assigned places and breaking with the ‘natural’ order of the sensible. Similarly, by experimenting with the visibility of the Othered body Katsura reoriented aesthetic-political sensibility and opened up a space for a wider discourse on gender and race in Japan.

Thursday, April 27, 4:30 to 6:30pm, CWAC156

Persons with concerns regarding accessibility please contact  Zhiyan Yang (zhiyan@uchicago.edu)

April 14, Yu Hui

Friday, April 14, 4:30 to 6:30pm, CWAC156

从细节发现历史——中国早期绘画鉴定与研究 Discovering History from Details – Research and Connoisseurship on Early Chinese Paintings

余辉  YU Hui

故宫博物院研究员, 国家文物鉴定委员会委员 Director of Research, Palace Museum in Beijing

*Please notice the special time of the talk, also notice that the presentation will be given in Chinese

五代南唐周文矩《重屏会棋图》卷(北宋摹本,故宫博物院藏)

 

本讲座以讲座人在近三十年间研究古代宫廷绘画的个案中发现的与古代历史的有着密切关联的绘画细节,如涉及政治(主要是王位继承)、军事、社会风俗、民族融合等许多事例,古画中的历史记录往往深藏其中,使远离古代社会的我们难以发现,但是,在古画中发现历史是有规律可以探寻的,如有些宫廷绘画中的年款,常常与那个时段发生的特殊事件有着密切的关系,尤其是帝王书画和表现帝王生活的绘画则更加鲜明。讲座人将以数十个绘画事例与大家共同探讨。演讲者还将同时揭开南唐周文矩《重屏会棋图》卷(宋摹本)中的历史密码。

 

Friday, April 14, 4:30 to 6:30pm, CWAC156

Persons with concerns regarding accessibility please contact  Zhiyan Yang (zhiyan@uchicago.edu)