Title IX FAQs

What conduct is prohibited by federal and state law ?
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and its implementing regulations, prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex in education programs or activities operated by recipients of Federal financial assistance. Sexual harassment of students, which includes acts of sexual violence, is a form of sex discrimination prohibited by Title IX. The University also adheres to the requirements of the Clery Act, the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), and the Illinois Preventing Sexual Violence in Higher Education Act. For details, see the University Policy on Harassment, Discrimination, and Sexual Misconduct.
What are a University’s obligations when it has notice of a report of sexual misconduct, which includes sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, and/or stalking?
The University is obligated to take immediate action to eliminate the harassment or misconduct, prevent its recurrence, and address its effects.
Who are confidential resources on campus?
Confidential resources on campus include the following:

  • Sexual Assault Deans-on-Call (SADoCs); 773.834.HELP 24/7 and 365 days/year
  • Student Counseling Service; 773.702.9800
  • Student Health Service; 773.702.4156
  • Ordained Religious Advisors; spirit.uchicago.edu
What are the reporting obligations of University staff, faculty, and other academic appointees?
University employees not designated as confidential resources are considered “Responsible Employees” and must report all incidents of gender-based discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual abuse, sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, or stalking to the Title IX Coordinator(s). “Responsible Employee” means any faculty member, other academic appointee, or staff employee who would be reasonably expected to have the authority or duty to report or take action to redress sexual misconduct. “Responsible Employees” include (among others) faculty and instructors, RAs, Resident Heads, Resident Deans, TAs, preceptors, administrative assistants, UCPD staff, and other University employees.
What are the reporting obligations of residential staff (RAs, RHs, and Resident Deans) when they have notice and/or receive a report of a sexual misconduct related incident?
All residential staff, including student employees, are considered Responsible Employees and must report any sexual misconduct related incident to the Title IX Coordinator(s). “Responsible Employee” means any faculty member, other academic appointee, or staff employee who would reasonably be expected to have the authority or duty to report or take action to redress sexual misconduct. “Responsible Employees” include (among others) faculty and instructors, RAs, Resident Heads, Resident Deans, TAs, preceptors, administrative assistants, UCPD staff, and other University employees.
What can a student expect if an incident of sexual misconduct is reported to the Title IX Coordinator(s)?
Students can expect to receive an email outreach outlining information on confidential resources, interim supports and measures, the University-wide student disciplinary process, and resources and referrals. Students are not obligated to respond to this outreach or engage with the Title IX Coordinator(s). Individuals can choose not to move forward with the University’s disciplinary process, but still receive support services. In rare circumstances, the Title IX Coordinator(s) may need to move forward with an investigation based on information already received. If this happens, the students will be notified.
Who is the University of Chicago’s Title IX Coordinator(s)?
Bridget Collier
Title IX Coordinator for the University
773.834.6367
bcollier@uchicago.edu

Shea Wolfe
Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Students
773.702.0438
swolfe1@uchicago.edu

Is there a time limit for a student making a report of sexual misconduct?
There is no time limit for reporting incidents. We do encourage reporting an incident as soon as possible in order to maximize our ability to respond promptly and effectively. Additionally, there is no time limit for initating a formal disciplinary process
Will parents be informed of a sexual misconduct report in instances where the student is under 18?
When a student turns 18 years old or enters a postsecondary institution at any age, the rights under FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act) transfer from the parents to the student.
What are the support/resources offered by the Title IX Coordinator(s) ?
Students who have reported sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic violence, and/or stalking have the right to request interim protective measures and/or reasonable accommodations, including, but not limited to:

  • Changes to academic, living, dining, working, or transportation situations
  • Obtaining and enforcing a University-issued no contact directive
  • Assistance in obtaining an order of protection or no contact order in State court
  • Medical assistance
  • Legal/law enforcement options
  • Safety planning
  • On- and off- campus referrals and resources
  • Assistance with accessing and navigating campus and local health and mental health services, counseling, and advocacy
  • Referral to the relevant formal disciplinary process
Does the Office for Sexual Misconduct Prevention and Support Office offer open office hours?

Yes, we accept walk-ins during our open office hours on Tuesdays from 11:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. at 5525 S. Ellis Ave. (Campus North Parking Garage).

Where can I find more information about annual statistics?
Annual statistics regarding the number of reports received, the number of students requesting investigations as a result of those reports, the number of matters that go into the formal disciplinary process as a result of those investigations, and outcomes of those hearings can be found here.
Why don't reported instances of sexual misconduct always lead to formal disciplinary hearings?
The University receives reports from a variety of sources, and anytime we receive information related to sexual misconduct, the University counts that as a report. With every report, the University makes outreach to the affected student (if the University has been given the student’s name, which is not always the case), and invites them to meet with the Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Students to receive support and additional information about resources, options for reporting to law enforcement, and engaging in the University’s disciplinary process. These reports do not always lead to a formal disciplinary process for a variety of reasons:

 

    • Students do not always respond to initial outreach from the Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Students.
    • Students who do meet with the Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Students receive support, resources, and accommodations, but may choose not to provide a formal written complaint, which is the necessary precursor to an investigation and formal disciplinary process. Individuals can choose to not move forward with the University’s disciplinary process, but can still receive support services, and federal guidance requires that this request is honored in almost all circumstances.
    • The report may not be eligible to enter into the University’s formal disciplinary process due to the status of the alleged respondent (i.e., they may not be affiliated with the University or are unknown to the University).
    • Reports can be anonymous notifications from confidential resources or anonymous completion of the electronic report found on UMatter and therefore initial outreach cannot be made to these individuals.
What is the difference between reporting sexual misconduct and a formal investigation/disciplinary process?
There is a distinction between seeking support, resources, and reporting options and initiating a disciplinary process, and it is vital for people to understand the difference, especially when reading statistics. Students can receive applicable resources and support from the Deputy Title IX Coordinator, and can then decide if they want to proceed with an investigation and initiate a disciplinary process. Note that in rare circumstances, the University may be obligated to proceed with an investigation. If this happens, the student will be notified. If the student would like to proceed with the disciplinary process, the Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Students connects them with the Associate Dean of Students in the University for Disciplinary Affairs for follow up and next steps in the disciplinary process. During the investigation and disciplinary process, all parties involved, including complainant and respondent, can meet with the Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Students to receive support services.  Please note that any information shared with the Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Students in seeking out support/resources is not shared with the Associate Dean of Students in the University for Disciplinary Affairs for the basis of any formal disciplinary complaint. Those processes are separate, and the University-wide Disciplinary Committee does not see notes or other documents collected by the Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Students to make a determination of responsibility/sanctions.
Where can I find additional information about the University-wide Student Disciplinary Process?
For additional information about the University-wide Disciplinary Process for complaints that a student engaged in a violation of the University’s Policy on Harassment, Discrimination, and Sexual Misconduct, please click here. Associate Dean of Students in the University for Disciplinary Affairs, Jeremy Inabinet, investigates alleged violations of the University Policy on Harassment, Discrimination, and Sexual Misconduct. His office can answer specific questions as it pertains to the investigatory and disciplinary process and can be reached at 773.834.4837.

Non-discrimination Statement

In keeping with its long-standing traditions and policies, the University of Chicago considers students, employees, applicants for admission or employment, and those seeking access to University programs on the basis of individual merit. The University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national or ethnic origin, age, status as an individual with a disability, protected veteran status, genetic information, or other protected classes under the law (including Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972). For additional information regarding the University of Chicago’s Policy on Harassment, Discrimination, and Sexual Misconduct, please see: http://harassmentpolicy.uchicago.edu/page/policy.

The University official responsible for coordinating compliance with this Notice of Nondiscrimination is Bridget Collier, Associate Provost for Equal Opportunity Programs. Ms. Collier also serves as the University’s Title IX Coordinator, Affirmative Action Officer, and Section 504/ADA Coordinator. You may contact Ms. Collier by emailing bcollier@uchicago.edu, by calling 773.702.5671, or by writing to Bridget Collier, Office of the Provost, The University of Chicago, 5525 S. Ellis Ave., Room 171, Chicago, IL 60637.

Read more about Title IX.