Spring 2019 Schedule

The Religion and the Human Sciences workshop is happy to announce the schedule for Spring 2019.

April 1
Andrew Kunze, Ph.D. Student in Anthropology and Sociology of Religion will present his dissertation chapter “Paper Bhakti
Martin Marty Center Library, 4:30pm -6:00pm 

April 15 
Alireza Doostdar, Assistant Professor of Anthropology of Religion and Islamic Studies  will present his chapter draft “God, Revolution, and the Unthinkable”
Martin Marty Center Library, 4:30pm-6:00pm

April 29 
Yang Shen, visiting Ph.D. Student in Anthropology from Boston University, will present her chapter draft “The Wish-Vows that Make Us: Agency, Ritual Attunement, and Living with Others in Buddhist Temples in Contemporary China”
Martin Marty Center Library, 4:30pm-6:00pm

May 13
H.S. Sum Cheuk Shing, Ph.D. Student in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations will present his paper “Religion as Medicine in Medieval China: Buddhist and Daoist Recipes for Treating the Sick, Raising the Dead, and Achieving Immortality
Martin Marty Center Library, 4:30pm – 6:00pm

We hope you can join us!

Sarah Levenstam & Kellan Klaus
Religion and the Human Sciences Workshop Coordinators

April 29: Yang Shen

Please join us on April 29 at 4:30 pm in the Martin Marty Center Library for a discussion of Yang Shen’s modified dissertation chapter draft entitled, “The Wish-Vows that Make Us: Agency, Ritual Attunement, and Living with Others in Buddhist Temples in Contemporary China.” Yang Shen is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Anthropology at Boston University. The paper can be found here.

April 15: Alireza Doostdar

Please join us on April 15 at 4:30 pm in the Martin Marty Center Library for a discussion of Professor Alireza Doostdar’s chapter draft entitled, “God, Revolution, and the Unthinkable.” The paper can be found here.

April 1 : Andrew Kunze

 

Please join us on April 1 at 4:30 pm in the Martin Marty Center seminar room for a discussion of Andrew’s dissertation chapter. The paper can be found here.

 

Call for Papers: Spring 2019

Dear R&HS Workshoppers,

 

We would like to invite you to participate in the Religion & Human Sciences workshop for this upcoming academic quarter. We plan to hold the workshop on five Monday afternoons from 4:30-5:45 on 04/01, 04/15, 4/29, and 05/13. If you have a paper, dissertation chapter, or piece of work that you would like to present and get feedback on, please reach out to us!

 

Yours truly,

 

Claire Hautot  – hautot@uchiago.edu

Kellan Klaus – kellan@uchicago.edu

Sarah Levenstam – sblevenstam@uchicago.edu

 

Spring 2018 Schedule

The Religion and the Human Sciences workshop is happy to announce the schedule for Spring 2018. Our theme this quarter is “Aesthetics of Religion.” This quarter features a few collaborative workshops, so be sure to check the time and place!

April 12
Diane Picio, Ph.D. Student in Religion, Literature, and Visual Culture will present her paper “Representing the Family.”
Swift 201, 12:00pm -1:15pm 
cosponsored by the Religions in America workshop

April 17
Kris Palmieri, Ph.D. Student in History of Science will present her paper “Biblical Criticism and the Transformation of Philology in 18th Century Göttingen.”
Marty Center Library, 12:00pm – 1:15pm 

May 1
Dhruv Nagar, Ph.D. Student in Philosophy of Religions, will present his paper “The Ṛgveda as cosmos-making tool: Vedic semantics of action & the question of the processual prehistory of the Indian philosophical tradition.”
Marty Center Library, 12:00pm – 1:15pm 
cosponsored by the Religion, Literature, and Visual Culture workshop

May 7
Clifford Ando, David B. and Clara E. Stern Professor of Humanities and Professor of Classics, will present his paper “The Discovery of Paganism.”
Swift 200, 4:30pm – 6:00pm
cosponsored by the Early Christian Studies workshop

 

We hope you can join us!

Rachel Carbonara & Marielle Harrison
Religion and the Human Sciences Workshop Co-Coordinators

Winter 2018 Schedule

The Religion and the Human Sciences Workshop is happy to announce the schedule for Winter 2018. Our theme this quarter is “Artifacts of Religion.” Meetings will take place on Mondays from 12:00-1:15pm in the Marty Center Library.  All events will include lunch!

January 8
Alex Jania, Ph.D. Student in History, will present his paper “For us, the earth still shakes: Thoughts on disaster memorialization in Japan and methodologies of emotional history”.
cosponsored by the East Asia Transregional Histories Workshop 

January 22
Alexandra Cotofana
, Ph.D. Candidate in Anthropology, Indiana University Bloomington, will present her paper “The importance of a meaningless 1989: Political continuities and religious communists.”

February 5
Justin Smolin, Ph.D. Student in History of Religions, will present his paper “Tāntrika on Trial: The Uncanny Genre of ‘Tantric Horror.’”

March 5
Paride Stortini
, Ph.D. Student in History of Religions, will present his paper “Imagining a cosmopolitan ‘Furusato’: India and Buddhism in the Silk Road Imaginaire of Hirayama Ikuo”.
cosponsored by the East Asia Art and Politics Workshop

 

We hope you can join us!

Marielle Harrison & Rachel Carbonara
Religion and the Human Sciences Workshop Co-Coordinators

Autumn 2017 Schedule

The Religion and the Human Sciences Workshop is happy to announce the schedule for Autumn 2017. Our theme this quarter is “Texts of Religion.” Meetings will take place on Mondays from 12:00-1:15pm in the Marty Center Library unless otherwise noted. All workshops will include lunch!

October 2 (Marty Center Seminar Room)
Adam Miller
, Ph.D. Student in History of Religions, will present his paper “Preaching and the Production of Joy: Ritualization, Affect, and Social Formation in Middle Period Indian Mahāyāna Buddhism.”

October 16                                 
Ana Mariella Bacigalupo, Professor of Anthropology at SUNY Buffalo, will present her paper “The Potency of Indigenous ‘Bibles’ and Biographies: Mapuche Shamanic Literacy and Historical Consciousness.”
co-sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies and the History of Religions Club       

October 30
Andrew Kunze, Ph.D. Student in Anthropology and Sociology of Religion, will present on “Mass Media Hinduism.”
co-sponsored by the Committee on Southern Asian Studies

November 27
Christian Wedemeyer, Associate Professor of the History of Religions, will present his work on rhetorical techniques in the Mahāyāna Sūtras “Rhetorics of Solidarity in Mahāyāna Sūtra Literature: Or, ‘You’re So Vain, I Bet You Think This Sūtra is About You'”
co-sponsored by the Buddhist Studies Club and the Committee on Southern Asian Studies

We hope you can join us!

Autumn 2016 Schedule

Dear Friends,

The Religion & Human Sciences workshop is excited it announce its schedule for this Fall quarter! We’ll meet on Tuesdays from 5 to 6:30pm either in Swift 208 or in the Marty Center Library, as indicated below (the Martin Marty Center is located on the second floor of Swift Hall. The Library is at the end of the hall, on the left.) Our sessions begin on the Tuesday of 2nd week (Oct 4), and run weekly through the Tuesday of 8th week (Nov 15). Snacks and drinks are always provided!

Our theme for the year is Public Religion (i.e. when public officials cite religion to support policy; religion’s status within publics and/or counterpublics; and how new media may be re-casting the entire private/public divide.) Please see our schedule below and send your thoughts, concerns, quips to Andrew at kunze@uchicago.edu.

Our presenters:

(Oct 4 – S208) J Barton Scott, Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto Department for the Study of Religion, will discuss his recent work on the Public and defamation in South Asia, part of which was recently published in the Special Issue of South Asia: The Journal of South Asian Studies, ‘What is a Public? Some Notes from South Asia.’

(Oct 11 – S208) Kajri JainAssociate Professor of Indian Visual Culture and Contemporary Art at the University of Toronto, will also discuss the Public in South Asia. Jain’s first book, Gods in the Bazaar, and examined popular religious art in India, and her current research considers the role of religion in public, democratic aesthetics and the emergence of giant historical monuments in India since the 1990s.

(Oct 18 – S208) Dotan Leshem, senior lecturer in the School of Political Science at the University of Haifa, will discuss religion’s entrance into the publics sphere, as portrayed in his new book, The Origins of Neoliberalism: Modeling the Economy From Jesus to Foucault.

Note: This will be a joint-workshop session with the Global Christianities Workshop.

(Oct 25 – Marty Lib.) Mennatallah Khalil, PhD candidate in Anthropology, will discuss her work on the use of religion in politics/for political legitimacy and public support in Egypt.

(Nov 1 – Marty Lib.) Will Kunert, MDiv 2017, will discuss his MDiv thesis on the movement to quantitatively measure the results of hospital chaplaincy. Hospital chaplaincy is one of the last fields to use quantitative research to analyze itself, or advocate for itself to public administrators. Many maintain that chaplaincy can’t be measured. Will investigates the quantitative research that has so far been done in hospital chaplaincy and the public ‘obsession’ with quantification.

(Nov 8 – Marty Lib.) Alireza Doostdar, Assistant Professor of Islamic Studies and the Anthropology of Religion, will discuss his working article on public screenings of ‘spiritual films’ in Iran, and recent Satanic accusations in response to the films.

(Nov 15 – Marty Lib.) Sahm Myung Suh, PhD candidate in ASR, will discuss his article, ‘Broadcasting the Good News through the Bamboo Curtain’; FEBC and its Spiritual Cold War, on Christian radio broadcasting in East Asia. See the abstract:

The Far Eastern Broadcasting Company is an American-born, global radio ministry network originally established in the wake of the Cold War to transmit the Christian Gospel behind the ‘Bamboo Curtain.’ Co-founded by an evangelical radio broadcaster, Robert Bowman, and an ex-Navy intelligence officer, John C. Broger, the FEBC made it its mission to provide spiritual nourishment to hidden or anonymous Christians who were imagined to profess Christian faith in private secrecy under communist rule, as well as to ward off the advancement of communism in the broad Asian region through faith-based propaganda war. By tracing the historical development of the FEBC during the Cold War, the paper I propose to present in the upcoming ISMRC conference will explore the ways in which the lines between the private and the public spheres become blurred in the cycle of production, transmission, and reception of the politically and religiously charged sound media. The enterprise of making radio stations in various parts of the world and producing multi-language programs evidently took place in the public sphere, which involves a great deal of efforts at raising funds, negotiating with local authorities, and overcoming various technological problems and challenges. Meanwhile, the messages were sent out to penetrate the ‘Bamboo Curtain,’ and the intended audience was expected to listen to them in private and ultimately create what may be called the ‘counter-public.’

Hope to see you there!

Fall 2016 Announcement & Call for Papers

We’re happy to announce that the Religion & Human Sciences workshop will be back in action this Fall quarter 2016. Hope you all will join us, and take note of a couple changes:


R&HS will be held only during the Fall quarter: (Winter? nope. Spring? nu-uh). Our idea is to foster a more focused conversation over a shorter period of time. Our schedule isn’t fixed yet, but the plan is to meet more frequently. Over the quarter, we’ll have about 7 sessions (maybe more!). We’ll also bring in a few outside speakers (more on that later).


Our theme for the quarter is ‘Public Religion’: We want to talk about religion in the public sphere, or religion that disrupts common public/private divides. We’ll also pay special attention to the role of mass media (new and old) in shaping the Public.


Call for Papers: If you’d like to present anything in the Fall quarter – dissertation chapters, conference presentations, article drafts, etc – please send me a title, abstract, and preferred date. As long as there’s something ‘Public’ and some ‘Religion,’ we’ll be happy to have you present.


Best,
Andrew



R&HS Poster copy

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