Programs

The Background

During his life, the late Hymen Milgrom donated substantially towards improving urban education, most significantly through the Urban Teacher Education Program at the University of Chicago, a program that has since progressed to a large scale with federal funding. The Hymen Milgrom Supporting Organization (HMSO), created with a $17-million gift to the University of Chicago from the estate of Hymen T. Milgrom (AB, Accounting, ’35), was established to seek ways that public education can help urban children become more highly skilled and more successful as adults.

In service of this, the HMSO launched the Successful Pathways from School to Work initiative in 2013, which supports research that will help educators become more effective in fostering the skills, dispositions, and experiences essential for success in the modern labor market.

Building on the success of this initiative, in 2017 the HMSO  launched a Milgrom Community Service and Innovation Fellowship for University of Chicago students, focused on helping improve the lives of disadvantaged children and youth in Chicago through education-related community service.

In 2019, the HMSO launched the Milgrom Educational Innovation Challenge.   This initiative focuses on designing solutions to problems facing Chicago neighborhoods and communities by funding University of Chicago organizations to provide programming to University of Chicago students to work collaboratively with students from Chicago public middle schools and high schools high schools to generate entrepreneurial solutions to educational needs in local communities while building students’ academic, workplace and leadership skills with support from the grantee organization.

The most recent program, is the Milgrom Computer Coding Fellowship. Beginning in the summer of 2022, this initiative will focus on helping improve the lives of disadvantaged youth in Chicago and their opportunities for successful employment by developing their computer coding and programming skills. HMSO grants to University of Chicago organizations will enable them to provide an opportunity to local high school students to learn to code.