An Edifying Conversation between Early Chinese Conception of Relationality and the Radical Empiricism of William James

Yunqi Zhang

PhD Student, Philosophy, Peking University

An Edifying Conversation between Early Chinese Conception of Relationality and the Radical Empiricism of William James
In William James’ radical empiricism, he employs “experience” as a relational notion as an attempt to overcome the subject-object dualism, which in many ways differ from the mainstream use of the term. This cause difficulty in understanding James’ radical empiricism. On the other hand, a distinctive characteristic of early Chinese thinking is its understanding of existence as based on interaction, and understanding determination of things as emergent in such interaction. This relational thinking structure may help us better understand James’ notion of the “context of experience.” Through this comparison we might be able to better understand the continuity and complexity of the content of the human experience, and to also celebrate the capacity of human beings to optimize the creative possibilities of this experience to live significant lives.

This workshop will focus on a pre-circulated paper and will be largely discussion-based. Email one of the coordinators below for the password. We hope to see you there!

November 30th, 12:00 PM, Swift 201

Hosted by the Philosophy of Religions Workshop at the University of Chicago.

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The Workshop on the Philosophy of Religions is committed to being a fully accessible and inclusive workshop.  Please contact Workshop Coordinators Danica Cao (ddcao@uchicago.edu), Russell Guilbault (rguilbault@uchicago.edu), or John Marvin (johnmarvin@uchicago.edu) in order to make any arrangements necessary to facilitate your participation in workshop events.

Between Self and No-Self: Some Phenomenological Considerations

Friday, December 3rd – 4:30PM
 
Prof. David W. Johnson
 
Associate Professor of Philosophy, Boston College
Between Self and No-Self: Some Phenomenological Considerations
The Philosophy of Religions Workshop is pleased to host Prof. David W. Johnson of Boston College, a renowned scholar of phenomenology, hermeneutics, and modern Japanese philosophy.  Prof. Johnson will be presenting an ongoing project he plans to give as a talk at a conference next year, the draft of which is attached below.  The talk concerns the No-Self idea in Buddhist thought, attempting “to show how it may be possible
to reconcile the reality of the self with a particular interpretation of the no-self doctrine.”
Prof. Johnson will be presenting an abridged, extemporized version of the talk presented in the draft, and then leading a discussion on the issues at hand with the second half of our time.  He is interested to hear especially from scholars of Buddhist philosophy who may be able to enrich and refine his engagement with those materials.  Reading the draft (attached below) before the presentation and discussion is encouraged, but not necessary for attendance.
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The Workshop on the Philosophy of Religions is committed to being a fully accessible and inclusive workshop.  Please contact Workshop Coordinators John Marvin (johnmarvin@uchicago.edu) or Tyler Neenan (tjneenan@uchicago.edu) in order to make any arrangements necessary to facilitate your participation in workshop events.