EthNoise!

The Music, Language, and Culture Workshop

January 24, 2010
by jmmaurer
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Full Schedule Winter Quarter 2010

Thursday, Jan. 21: Mike Figueroa – Goodspeed 205

Thursday, Jan. 28: Joshua Solomon – Goodspeed 205

Thursday, Feb. 11: Charles Garrett – Goodspeed 205

Monday, Feb. 15: Luis Manuel Garcia, in conjunction with the Gender & Sexuality Workshop and the Theater & Performance Workshop – Location  in Wieboldt 206 from 3pm – 5pm.  Please notice the differences in time and location from our regular meetings.

Thursday, Feb. 18: Morgan Luker – Goodspeed 205

Thursday, Feb. 25: Jonathan De Souza – Goodspeed 205

Thursday, March 4: Anna-Lise Santella – Goodspeed 205

Please mark your calendars.  Thanks so much.

January 21, 2010
by jmmaurer
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Michael A. Figueroa, presenting, “Land of Milk and Honey?: Music and the Broken Promise of Zionism in South Indian Jewry”

Welcome back Ethnoise friends,

Please join us for our first Ethnoise The Ethnomusicology Workshop meeting of the winter quarter, taking place on this Thursday afternoon, January 21, from 4:30 to 6 in Goodspeed 205.

We welcome PhD student in ethnomusicology, Michael A. Figueroa, presenting, “Land of Milk and Honey?: Music and the Broken Promise of Zionism in South Indian Jewry”.

Recording of "Oh, Lovely Parrot!: Jewish Women's Songs from Kerala"

Biography: Michael A. Figueroa is a PhD student in ethnomusicology at the University of Chicago. His research interests include music of the Middle East, Jewish music, African-American music, historiography, postcolonial studies, and the history of musicology. His dissertation will focus on the musical construction of Jerusalem as a sacred, contested space within the Arab-Israeli conflict.

Abstract:
Unlike the vast majority of émigrés to Israel, the Jews from South Asia did not arrive in flight of persecution. On the contrary, due to the traditionally tolerant rule of Hinduism, Indian Jews enjoyed throughout their long (potentially 2000-year) history relative privilege and security, with few exceptions. Curious then, that since the founding of the state of Israel in 1948, nearly all of the 30,000 Jews from India have decided to emigrate to that country, leaving their Indian homes to fulfill the Zionist dream prophesized in the Hebrew Bible and politicized by communities in Europe. As with many other non-European groups who made new lives in Israel, broad structural inequalities have blocked Indians from enjoying full rights of citizenship, to which they are entitled as constituents of the global Jewish ecumene. These communities, which existed as minorities within India because of their religion, continue to live on the margins in the Promised Land due to their ethnicity. In this presentation, I will explore the extent to which musical changes resulted from Indian emigration to Israel, devoting particular attention to the ways in which extra-liturgical performance practices and musical ideas reflected the changing socioeconomic realities that accompanied settlement in Israel.

Ethnoise! The Ethnomusicology Workshop
Thursday, January 21, 2009
Goodspeed 205

January 10, 2010
by jmmaurer
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“Race, Nation, Translation, and the Meaning of Danzón across Borders” Alejandro L. Madrid, PhD, Associate Professor of Latin American and Latino Studies, University of Illinois at Chicago

Thursday, October 15, 2009

Based on ethnographic and archival work conducted in Cuba and Mexico between 2006 and 2009, this paper explores transnational cultural relations between Cuba and Mexico and how they inform local ideas about race, Blackness, and nationality as evidence in the historical and contemporary practice of danzón in both countries. I argue that the continuous diaspora of danzón and other related music genres and their appropriation in Mexico allowed for complex transnational constructions of senses of belonging where contradictory discourses about race, class, gender, and nationality intersect.

Alejandro L. Madrid is an ethnomusicologist and cultural theorist whose research focuses on the intersection of modernity, tradition, globalization, and ethnic identity in popular and art music, dance, and expressive culture from Mexico, the U.S.-Mexico border, and the circum-Caribbean.  He is the author of Nor-tec Rifa! Electronic Dance Music from Tijuana to the World (Oxford University Press, 2008), Los sonidos de la nación moderna. Música, cultura e ideas en el México post-revolucionario, 1920-1930 (Casa de las Américas, 2008), and Sounds of the Modern Nation. Music, Culture and Ideas in Post-Revolutionary Mexico (Temple University Press, 2009), and co-editor of Postnational Musical Identities. Cultural Production, Distribution and Consumption in a Globalized Scenario (Lexington Books, 2007), as well as more than a dozen articles in national and international refereed journals. Dr. Madrid is the recipient of the Casa de las Américas Award for Latin American Musicology (2005), the Samuel Claro Valdés Award for Latin American Musicology (2002), the American Musicological Society Publication Subvention Award (2009), and the A-R Editions Award of the American Musicological Society, Midwest Chapter (2001-2002).  Dr. Madrid serves on the advisory boards of the Latin American Music Review, Dancecult: Journal of Electronic Dance Music Culture, and Trans. Revista Transcultural de Música, and is Senior Editor of Latin American and Latina/o entries for the new edition of the Grove Dictionary of American Music.  He is associate professor of Latin American and Latino studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Ethnoise! The Ethnomusicology Workshop
Thursday, October 15, 2009
4:30 pm, Goodspeed, room 205

January 10, 2010
by jmmaurer
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“Lost in the Sound of Separation/: Mainstreams and Alternatives at a Christian Rock Festival” – Andrew Mall & “From Migration to Generation: Kampala (Uganda) in the Global Classical Network” – Suzanne Wint

Thursday, November 12, 2009

Presentations: “Lost in the Sound of Separation/: Mainstreams and Alternatives at a
Christian Rock Festival” – Andrew Mall

Rock festivals have long been representative sites of tension between mainstream musical cultures and alternative (sub)cultures. From 1969’s iconic Woodstock to the present-day Bonnaroo, Coachella, and Lollapalooza festivals, these ambitious events attempt to balance alternative aesthetics and ideologies against mainstream scope and practicalities. Cornerstone Festival is similar to these events in many ways: it is annual, takes place over several days, has available campgrounds, presents dozens of musicians and bands on multiple stages, requires a full year of planning and an army of staff and volunteers to execute, and attracts a primarily young generation of participants.

But Cornerstone is crucially different from these other festivals: it markets itself as a festival of alternative Christian rock music,
presenting self-identifying Christian musicians to Christian fans. For participants, the music performed at Cornerstone provides an alternative to the mainstreams of both (secular) popular music and faith-based music: Cornerstone aesthetics have more in common with contemporary punk, hardcore, and indie rock than they do with the Nashville-based Contemporary Christian Music industry or the guitar-based praise music found in many contemporary worship services.

How do the performers, mediators, and listeners of alternative Christian rock negotiate these multiple tensions? How can their negotiations contribute to existing conceptions of mainstreams and alternatives? Describing the lived experiences of Cornerstone participants requires a perspective more subjectively nuanced than the strict dichotomies of previous models. In working through these ideas, this ethnography studies the ways in which Cornerstone contributes to participants’ self-conception of their Christian lifestyle: mainstream, alternative, and in-between.

“From Migration to Generation: Kampala (Uganda) in the Global Classical Network” – Suzanne Wint

The introduction of Western classical music to Uganda can be traced back to European Christian missionaries of the late 19th century. Just as missionization patterns have changed and Christianity has become Ugandan, so too has the musical practice that migrated with Christianity become Ugandan. In both vocal and instrumental performance in the capital city Kampala, “standards” of the European Renaissance, Baroque and Classical periods share the stage with twentieth- and twenty-first-century compositions by Ugandans. More than the generation of individual “works,” however, it is the generation of social networks surrounding musical performance that illustrates how classical music has become a Ugandan practice. Looking at Kampala through the lens of the “scene” (H. Becker, T. Jackson), I identify relationships that maintain and expand the practice of classical music in Kampala. The scene also extends its reach internationally, not only by importing musical commodities such as recordings, instruments and sheet music, but also by exporting knowledge – through teaching, performing and adjudicating – to other regional nodes in the network of global cities (Sassen) throughout Eastern and Southeastern Africa. The generation of local and regional African networks demonstrates one way in which a migrated music might find a home beyond the European diaspora with which it was originally associated.

Ethnoise! The Ethnomusicology Workshop
Thursday, November 12, 2009
4:30 pm, Goodspeed, room 205

January 10, 2010
by jmmaurer
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“Can the Subaltern Get on the Mic?: Superheroes, Beats, Memes, and Agency in Producing Chicago Youth Hip-Hop” presented by Ritwik Banerji, improvisor, composer, and digital media artist

Thursday, November 5, 2009

The teaching artist has the power to manifest the self-knowledge and civic engagement of youth through art.  This method not only provides relevant educational enrichment, but can activate this self-knowledge in pursuit of a more robust and collaborative social science.  In this talk, I will reflect on my experiences as a teaching artist at the Indo-American Center and with the Chicago Park District’s Inferno Mobile Recording Studio, a project designed to facilitate active citizenship of youth through the creation of beats, rhymes, songs, and other audio-based arts.  How can the teaching artist cultivate feelings of self-efficacy, undo the effects of false consciousness from popular media/music, and create musical memes of a positive Chicago for youth, from youth?

Ethnoise! The Ethnomusicology Workshop
Thursday, November 5, 2009
4:30 pm, Goodspeed, room 205

January 10, 2010
by jmmaurer
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“Sanctifying the Haitian Soul: Thoughts on Faith, Cultural Nationalism, and Popular Music” presented by Melvin L. Butler, Assistant Professor of Music at the University of Chicago

Thursday, October 1, 2009

Many Christians in Haiti and its diaspora embrace the popular music
genre known as “konpa” as a vehicle for musical praise with a local
color. However, others insist that konpa’s associations with secular
entertainment render it inappropriate for ritual use and unfit for
Christian consumption. In this talk, I examine the ways in which this
impassioned debate overlaps with ongoing discussions concerning
Haitian cultural identity. Konpa is an expressive tool through which
believers position themselves in relation to spiritual others while
performing national identities that stand in contrast to sounds and
images of Haiti perpetuated by local and global media.

Melvin L. Butler’s research and teaching interests center on
performance, identity, and religious experience in the Caribbean and
the United States. He has received a Ford Foundation Pre-Doctoral
Fellowship (1999) and a Fulbright IIE research grant (2002). In
2004-05, he was the Thurgood Marshall Dissertation Fellow-in-residence
at Dartmouth College. After earning the Ph.D. in ethnomusicology from
New York University, he taught at the University of Virginia from 2005
to 2008.

Ethnoise! The Ethnomusicology Workshop
Thursday, October 1, 2009
4:30 pm, Goodspeed, room 205

January 5, 2010
by jmmaurer
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New Year, New Updates for Ethnoise!

Hi Ethnoise Friends,

Due to some complications with technology, the Ethnoise! The Ethnomusicology Worskshop blog has been long neglected since the passing of the baton at the beginning of the academic year. 2009-2010 coordinators, Monica Mays and Lily Wohl would like to extend a belated welcome for a new year to Ethnoise! and to welcome everyone to 2010. You’ll notice that updates on past Ethnoise! meetings will appear in the next few days and that new information and links with the Winter Quarter 2010 schedule will follow.  For more information or questions, please contact your co-coordinators at maysm@uchicago.edu or lwohl@uchicago.edu.

Happy New Year!

Tony Camargo “El Año Viejo”

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