EthNoise!

The Music, Language, and Culture Workshop

March 7, 2016
by jmmaurer
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March 9: Rudolf Pietsch

This week we are delighted and honored to welcome Rudolf Pietsch, Prof. Dr, and Deputy Director, Institut für Volksmusikforschung und Ethnomusikologie, Vienna, for a special Wednesday workshop sponsored in conjunction with the Music History/Theory workshop. His presentation will be on the topic “Sound aspects caused by the formation of intentional and accidental multipart instrumental music.” He will draw examples from various Austrian musical ensembles.

 
IMPORTANT NOTE: This workshop is on Wednesday, March 9 in a special location, room 801 in the Logan Center for the Arts.

In addition to his scholarly work, Professor Pietsch in an eminent musician (for a sample performance, see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=abnCV_hCIuk). We invite you to join us for his presentation, the ensuing conversation, and refreshments on Wednesday, March 9  in Logan 801 from 4:30-6pm.

March 2, 2016
by jmmaurer
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March 3: Nadine Hubbs

This week we are delighted and honored to welcome Nadine Hubbs, professor of women’s studies and music at the University of Michigan, for a special Thursday workshop sponsored in conjunction with the Music History/Theory workshop. Her presentation is entitled, “How the White Working Class (Supposedly) Became Homophobic: Antibourgeois Country and the Middle-Classing of the Queer.”

 
IMPORTANT NOTE: This workshop is in a special location, room 801 in the Logan Center for the Arts.

Nadine Hubbs is professor of women’s studies and music and faculty associate in American culture at the University of Michigan, where she also directs the Lesbian-Gay-Queer Research Initiative. She has written on gender and sexuality in popular and concert music throughout many essays and reviews and in two books, The Queer Composition of America’s Sound (California 2004), and Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music (California 2014). Music and gender-sexuality studies are fused with class analysis in Rednecks and her other recent work, including “‘Jolene,’ Genre, and the Everyday Homoerotics of Country Music: Dolly Parton’s Loving Address of the Other Woman,” published last fall in Women and Music, and two forthcoming essays: “The Promised Land: Springsteen’s Epic Heterosexuality and Prospects for Queer Life” and “How the White Working Class (Supposedly) Became Homophobic: Antibourgeois Country and the Middle-Classing of the Queer.”

We heartily invite you to join us for the presentation, ensuing conversation, and refreshments on Thursday, March 3 in Logan 801 from 4:30-6pm.

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