Hoyt Long

Hoyt Long (Associate Professor of Japanese Literature in the East Asian Languages and Civilizations Department)

“A History of Distant Reading in Japan”

Friday, April 13th, 3:00pm-5:00pm in CEAS 319

Discussant: Alex Murphy (PhD Candidate in EALC)

Please join us Friday (4/13) from 3:00pm to 5:00pm as we host Professor Hoyt Long (Associate Professor of Japanese Literature). He will present a draft chapter from his book project, which he summarizes as follows:

In Japan, the impulse to reason about literature with numbers is at least as old as Natsume Sōseki’s Theory of Literature (1907). Most recently, computational methods and the availability of digital corpora have channeled this impulse toward new ways of engaging with Japanese literary history. In this essay I consider the relation of Japan’s quantitative pasts with its quantitative futures by tracing a genealogy of quantitative reasoning that begins with Sōseki’s attempts to read literature physiologically, moves through early stylistic and psycholinguistic analyses of the 1930s and 1950s, and ends with the linguistic turn of the 1980s. I use this genealogy to reflect on when it has seemed necessary to reason about literature with numbers; on the ways that the methodological infrastructure for this reasoning was built and borrowed; and on what this history can tell us at a time when numbers seem necessary and useful once again.

The paper is available directly below, or at this link. If you have not received the password, or have questions about accessibility, please feel free to contact Helina Mazza-Hilway (mazzah@uchicago.edu) or Susan Su (susansu@uchicago.edu).

Yujie Li

The 28″ bicycle design pattern with specifications, by the Team of Inspection and Research
of the Shanghai Bicycle Manufacturer Association, 1955

Yujie Li (PhD Student in History)
“Birth of the Phoenix Bicycle: Socialist Firm Formation and Industrial Standardization in the Early PRC”
Friday, March 30th, 3-5pm in CEAS 319
Discussant: Spencer Stewart (PhD Student in History)

Please join us Friday (3/30) from 3-5pm as we host Yujie Li (PhD Student in History). She will present a paper to be incorporated into a larger research project. She summarizes the paper as follows:

This paper is a case study on the history of Socialist Transformation of Capitalist Industry and Commerce Movement (1953-1956). It examines how industrial standardization was enforced and achieved in the Shanghai bicycle industry before, during and shortly after the Socialist Transformation. By focusing on the bicycle, this paper sheds light on the technological objectives of machine-tool industries under the particular developing needs of the early PRC. The paper tries to provide a detailed account of the transformation of the Shanghai bicycle industry by probing into the entanglement of the political, economic and technological changes, and particularly, to illuminate private enterprisers’ tactics to find themselves a new position while coming into the Socialist system.

The paper is available directly below, or at this link. If you have not received the password, or have questions about accessibility, please feel free to contact Helina Mazza-Hilway (mazzah@uchicago.edu) or Susan Su (susansu@uchicago.edu).

Spring Quarter 2018 Calendar

Cho Boo-soo, 수련 (Water lily), 116.8×91cm, Acrylic on Canvas, 2010.

3/30   Yujie Li, PhD Student in History
“Birth of the Phoenix Bicycle: Standardization and Socialist Firm Formation in the Early PRC”
Time & location: 3:00-5:00pm in CEAS 319

4/13   Hoyt Long, Associate Professor of Japanese Literature in EALC
“A History of Distant Reading in Japan”
Time & location: 3:00-5:00pm in CEAS 319

5/1   Corey Byrnes, Assistant Professor of Modern Chinese Literature at Northwestern University
Defining the Chinese Landscape of Desolation in Teaching and Research
Time & location: 5:00pm-7:00pm in Cochrane-Woods Art Center 152
Co-sponsored with the Visual and Material Perspectives on East Asia Workshop

5/18   Lester Hu, PhD Candidate in Music History and Theory
“Air, qi, and spiritus: The Kangxi Emperor’s Fourteen-Tone Temperament and the Qing Conquest of China”
Time & location: 3:00-5:00pm in Wieboldt 301N

6/1   Jun Hee Lee, PhD Candidate in History 
Let the People Sing: Politico-Musical Ideas and Practices in the Early Utagoe Movement, 1948-1955″
Time & location: 3:00-5:00pm in CEAS 319

Paride Stortini

Hirayama Ikuo, “Ancestral Buddhism,” 1959. Saku Municipal Museum Modern Art Collection.

Paride Stortini (PhD Student, Divinity)
“Imagining a Cosmopolitan “Furusato”: India and Buddhism in the Silk Road Imaginaire of Hirayama Ikuo”
Monday, March 5th, 12:00pm-1:15pm in Swift Hall’s Marty Center Library
Discussant: Sandy Lin (PhD Student in Art History)
Co-sponsored with the Religion and the Human Sciences Workshop

Please join us Monday (3/5) from 12:00pm-1:15pm as we host Paride Stortini (PhD Student in Divinity). He will present a draft of his qualifying exams paper in progress, which he summarizes as follows:

This paper is on a topic that is not directly linked to my dissertation research and will not be included in my dissertation, which will be focused on India in Meiji Japan. Nevertheless, many of the theoretical references, as well as the general issue of Buddhism and pan-Asianism, will certainly end up in my dissertation. In addition, I plan to present the last section of the paper at a conference in Delhi at the end of March on “India in the Silk Road,” and plan to keep this material for future research projects and single article publication. In this paper I am working on a chronological period (post-WWII Japan) with which I am less familiar than the Meiji period, and I use a lot of art, with which I am definitely not familiar, that is why any suggestion from colleagues with more expertise will be greatly appreciated.
The paper is available directly below, or at this link. If you have not received the password, or have questions about accessibility, please feel free to contact Helina Mazza-Hilway (mazzah@uchicago.edu) or Susan Su (susansu@uchicago.edu).

 

Sung Hyun Kang

Sung Hyun Kang is an Assistant Professor at the Department of International Cultural Studies & Institute for East Asian Studies, SungKongHoe University (Seoul).

Sung Hyun Kang, Assistant Professor at SungKongHoe University
“Transnational Archives: Cold War, Postcolonialism, and Korean Studies”
Friday, February 23rd, 3-5pm in CEAS 319
Interpreter: Sandra Park (PhD Student, History)
Sponsored with the East Asia Transregional Histories Workshop and the Committee on Korean Studies

Please join us Friday (2/23) as we host Professor Sung Hyun Kang. Professor Kang will discuss two papers: an article draft on the topic of Korean ‘comfort women’ photography, as well as a reflection on his experiences engaging in archival research for the article. This workshop will be of significance to both to those who are interested in questions of photography, moving images, and comfort women; and also in the practical concerns of conducting archival research regarding images, both still and in motion.

Professor Kang’s article draft focuses on the still and motion pictures of Japanese military ‘comfort women’ captured by army photographers attached to the U.S. Army 164th Signal Photo Corps in China, Burma, and India during World War II. With attention to related documents and testimonies of “comfort women”, Kang analyzes the viewpoint of the photographers, as well as the intent and nature of the army photographers’ activities. Moreover, this paper uncovers the stories of individual Korean ‘comfort women’ who appear as the subjects in these still and motion pictures.

The papers are available directly below, or at this link. If you have not received the password, or have questions about accessibility, please feel free to contact Helina Mazza-Hilway (mazzah@uchicago.edu) or Susan Su (susansu@uchicago.edu).

This event is sponsored by the Committee on Korean Studies at the University of Chicago Center for East Asian Studies with support from a Title VI National Resource Center Grant from the United States Department of Education.

Alex Murphy

Clockwise from left: Fumiko Kawabata, Eiga no Tomo (July 1938), flyer for Zenkoku Nomin Sogo Taikai (April 1935), in-studio session for JOAK program ‘santo no bunka wo kataru (1933), promotional image for NHK Tokyo station JOAK.

Alex Murphy (PhD Student, EALC)
“The Era of the Voice: Performance, Technology, and Politics in Japan, 1918-1942”
Wednesday, February 14th, 4:30-6:30pm in CEAS 319
Discussant: Nicholas Lambrecht (PhD Candidate, EALC)

Please join us Wednesday (2/14) from 4:30-6:30pm as we host Alex Murphy (PhD Student in EALC). He will present a draft of his dissertation proposal, which he summarizes as follows:

The 1920s and 30s in Japan witnessed a striking degree of attention converge on the voice in poetry, theater, and popular music. Alert to recent advances in radio, commercial recording, and sound film, artists, intellectuals, and activists sought to reckon with the human voice both as an increasingly powerful medium of public self-expression as well as a material and aesthetic object of mediation itself. For poets and musicians in turn, sound technology seemed at once to enliven new modes of vocal expression while ironically threatening the very sense of immediacy and authorial presence that drew many to the voice in the first place. At the same time, the transit of voices and bodies on records and radio waves across the Pacific and throughout Japan’s heterogeneous empire invited unruly expressions of subjectivity across audible markers of race, gender, and culture. By addressing this historical moment as an ‘era of the voice,’ then, my dissertation project explores how these discursive and technological currents manifested in embodied vocal practice, and how an attunement to these sounds might help to rethink the culture and politics of interwar Japan.

The paper is available directly below, or at this link. If you have not received the password, or have questions about accessibility, please feel free to contact Helina Mazza-Hilway (mazzah@uchicago.edu) or Susan Su (susansu@uchicago.edu).