Jun Hee Lee


Title screen from film Araki Sakae the Laborer-Composer (1993)

Jun Hee Lee (PhD Candidate in History)
“In Chorus with Japanese Laborers: the Utagoe Movement and Araki Sakae the Laborer-Composer”
Friday, June 1st, 3:00pm-5:00pm in CEAS 319
Discussant: Alex Murphy (PhD Candidate in EALC)

Please join us Friday (6/1) from 3:00pm to 5:00pm as we host Jun Hee Lee (PhD Candidate in History). He will present a draft chapter from his dissertation, which he summarizes as follows:

The Utagoe movement arose, by official account, in 1948 in association with the Japanese Communist Party’s early postwar cultural policy.  Utagoe quickly gained momentum in the mid-1950s as it acquired associate performing groups in workplaces across Japan.  As Utagoe began aligning with labor and peace movements through the 1950s, one culturally and politically conscious laborer from northern Kyushu found his calling: Araki Sakae (1924-1962), a second-generation coal miner in Miike, the future site of a landmark labor dispute in postwar Japan.  Araki would dedicate the last ten years of his life to Utagoe, partaking in the Miike coal miners’ strike between 1959 and 1960 with his own songs.  This paper examines ways in which Utagoe has subsequently celebrated Araki Sakae as an ideal laborer-composer (rōdōsha sakkyokuka) figure who was at once an earnest, politically conscious laborer and a creative soul.  By exploring specific manners in which Utagoe posited the Miike strike as a national struggle and established Araki and his songs as landmarks for Utagoe’s timeline, this paper demonstrates how Utagoe produced and maintained a narrative of continued struggle (tatakai) for “peace” and “independence” of Japan, while eschewing Araki’s own life trajectory predating his encounter with Utagoe in favor of emphasizing Utagoe’s and Araki’s joint confrontations with “American imperialism” and “monopoly capital”.  Utagoe’s continued celebration of Araki today bespeaks the endurance of such perspective, in which continued struggles by Japanese laborers occupy a quintessential place.

The paper is available directly below, or at this link. If you have not received the password, or have questions about accessibility, please feel free to contact Helina Mazza-Hilway (mazzah@uchicago.edu) or Susan Su (susansu@uchicago.edu).

Pedagogy Roundtable: Syllabi Workshop

Sohye Kim, PhD Candidate in EALC; David Krolikoski, PhD Candidate in EALC; Kyle Peters, PhD Candidate in EALC; Yiren Zheng, PhD Candidate in EALC
Pedagogy Roundtable: Syllabi Workshop
Friday, May 18th, 3:00pm-5:00pm in Wieboldt 301N

Please join us Friday (5/18) from 3:00pm-5:00pm as we host a pedagogy roundtable of PhD Candidates from the East Asian Languages and Civilizations department. Roundtable participants will submit drafts of syllabi for the workshop’s consideration, and the following discussion will provide opportunity for workshop participants not only to give feedback on the particular syllabi drafts that have been circulated, but also to consider issues of creating East Asia-related syllabi for undergraduates: balancing area studies and discipline, managing the constraints and benefits of the quarter system, and transforming one’s own expertise and research into teaching material.

The syllabi are available directly below, or at this link. If you have not received the password, or have questions about accessibility, please feel free to contact Helina Mazza-Hilway (mazzah@uchicago.edu) or Susan Su (susansu@uchicago.edu).

Corey Byrnes

Duan Jianyu, Beautiful Dream #7, 2008

Corey Byrnes (Assistant Professor of Modern Chinese Literature in the Asian Languages and Cultures Department, Northwestern University)
“Defining the Chinese Landscape of Desolation in Teaching and Research”
Tuesday, May 1st, 5:00pm-7:00pm in the Cochrane-Woods Art Center, Room 157
Discussant: Pao-chen Tang (PhD Student, Cinema and Media Studies & EALC)
This event is co-sponsored with the Visual and Material Perspectives on East Asia Workshop and sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies with support from a Title VI National Resource Center Grant from the United States Department of Education.

Please join us Tuesday (5/1) from 5:00pm-7:00pm as we host Professor Corey Byrnes, Assistant Professor of Modern Chinese Literature at Northwestern University. He will present an essay in progress as well as two related syllabi. The following workshop discussion will be an opportunity not only to offer feedback on the essay, but also to address the challenges of combining research and teaching and designing a syllabus based upon one’s research interests. We look forward to the continuation of discussion after the workshop at the catered dinner which will follow.

Professor Byrnes summarizes his essay as follows:

This joint APEA-VMPEA workshop will center on three related documents: an essay in progress entitled “Landscapes of Desolation” and two syllabi for a course with the same name. The essay is part of a broader attempt to reconsider the role of landscape and “tradition” in the context of environmentally conscious visual and literary culture representing Mainland China (mostly). In general, I am interested in how landscape has come to function as both a privileged way to represent environmental problems in China and also a practical ecocritical mode designed to move people and change behaviors. More specifically, in this essay I consider how specific art historical and cultural influences are used in three interconnected “modes” (the documentary, the trompe l’oeil and the fantastical) of what I am calling the “landscape of desolation” to support this practical ecocritical function. The essay extends some of the ideas I explore in my forthcoming book, Fixing Landscape: A Techno-Poetic History of China’s Three Gorges (Columbia, December 2018), but it emerges more directly from my experiences teaching an upper division seminar on literary and visual responses to environmental degradation in China and Taiwan. For the seminar meeting, I look forward to discussing both the article and also my experience in moving between teaching and researching. As you will see, there is significant overlap between the course materials and the primary and secondary sources I use in the article. The earliest version of this article predates these courses, though the current version really emerged out of my experiences teaching this seminar in the winter of 2016 and again in the winter of 2018.

The paper is available directly below, or at this link. If you have not received the password, or have questions about accessibility, please feel free to contact Helina Mazza-Hilway (mazzah@uchicago.edu) or Susan Su (susansu@uchicago.edu).

Hoyt Long

Hoyt Long (Associate Professor of Japanese Literature in the East Asian Languages and Civilizations Department)

“A History of Distant Reading in Japan”

Friday, April 13th, 3:00pm-5:00pm in CEAS 319

Discussant: Alex Murphy (PhD Candidate in EALC)

Please join us Friday (4/13) from 3:00pm to 5:00pm as we host Professor Hoyt Long (Associate Professor of Japanese Literature). He will present a draft chapter from his book project, which he summarizes as follows:

In Japan, the impulse to reason about literature with numbers is at least as old as Natsume Sōseki’s Theory of Literature (1907). Most recently, computational methods and the availability of digital corpora have channeled this impulse toward new ways of engaging with Japanese literary history. In this essay I consider the relation of Japan’s quantitative pasts with its quantitative futures by tracing a genealogy of quantitative reasoning that begins with Sōseki’s attempts to read literature physiologically, moves through early stylistic and psycholinguistic analyses of the 1930s and 1950s, and ends with the linguistic turn of the 1980s. I use this genealogy to reflect on when it has seemed necessary to reason about literature with numbers; on the ways that the methodological infrastructure for this reasoning was built and borrowed; and on what this history can tell us at a time when numbers seem necessary and useful once again.

The paper is available directly below, or at this link. If you have not received the password, or have questions about accessibility, please feel free to contact Helina Mazza-Hilway (mazzah@uchicago.edu) or Susan Su (susansu@uchicago.edu).

Yujie Li

The 28″ bicycle design pattern with specifications, by the Team of Inspection and Research
of the Shanghai Bicycle Manufacturer Association, 1955

Yujie Li (PhD Student in History)
“Birth of the Phoenix Bicycle: Socialist Firm Formation and Industrial Standardization in the Early PRC”
Friday, March 30th, 3-5pm in CEAS 319
Discussant: Spencer Stewart (PhD Student in History)

Please join us Friday (3/30) from 3-5pm as we host Yujie Li (PhD Student in History). She will present a paper to be incorporated into a larger research project. She summarizes the paper as follows:

This paper is a case study on the history of Socialist Transformation of Capitalist Industry and Commerce Movement (1953-1956). It examines how industrial standardization was enforced and achieved in the Shanghai bicycle industry before, during and shortly after the Socialist Transformation. By focusing on the bicycle, this paper sheds light on the technological objectives of machine-tool industries under the particular developing needs of the early PRC. The paper tries to provide a detailed account of the transformation of the Shanghai bicycle industry by probing into the entanglement of the political, economic and technological changes, and particularly, to illuminate private enterprisers’ tactics to find themselves a new position while coming into the Socialist system.

The paper is available directly below, or at this link. If you have not received the password, or have questions about accessibility, please feel free to contact Helina Mazza-Hilway (mazzah@uchicago.edu) or Susan Su (susansu@uchicago.edu).