Will Carroll

Friday, October 6th, 3:30 – 5:30 p.m. in Wieboldt 301N

 Will Carroll, “I don’t masturbate; I fight!”: The Specter of Kita Ikki in Suzuki Seijun’s Fighting Elegy” 

Discussant: Pao-Chen Tang (PhD student, Cinema and Media Studies and EALC)

Please join us Friday, October 6th, as we host Will Carroll (PhD Candidate in Cinema and Media Studies and EALC). He will present a draft of his article in progress, which he summarizes as follows:

This article draft reconsiders both Suzuki Seijun’s relationship to the New Left and the applicability of Japanese cinephilic film criticism to questions of history and ideology. It does so by looking at the film Fighting Elegy (Suzuki’s penultimate film for Nikkatsu, made in 1966) through the lens of an article written about the film by the critic Gondō Susumu in 1969. My ambition is that the article will mutually enrich our understanding of both the film and the methodology of the branch of film criticism in which Gondō is working.

The paper is available directly below, or at this link. If you have not received the password, or have questions about accessibility, please feel free to contact Helina Mazza-Hilway (mazzah@uchicago.edu) or Susan Su (susansu@uchicago.edu).

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Fall Quarter 2017 Calendar

Flowering Cherry and Autumn Maples with Poem Slips. Tosa Mitsuoki (c. 1617-1691) on a six-panel screen; ink, color, gold, and silver on silk.

10/6    Will Carroll, PhD Candidate in Cinema and Media Studies and EALC
“I don’t masturbate; I fight!”: The Specter of Kita Ikki in Suzuki Seijun’s Fighting Elegy
Time & location: 3:30pm in Wieboldt 301N

10/20   Matthew Lowenstein, PhD Student in History
“An American Banker in Shanghai: Frank J. Raven in Historiographical Perspective”
Time & location: 3pm in Wieboldt 301N

10/27   Reiko Abe Auestad, Professor, Department of Culture Studies and Oriental Languages, University of Oslo
“Tsushima Yūko (1947-2016): Calling Upon the Dead”
Time & location: 3pm in CEAS 319

11/3     Nicholas Wong, PhD Candidate in Comparative Literature
“Literary Collectives and “Minor” Time in Late 1950s Mahua Autobiographical Fiction and Reportage”
Time & location: 3pm in CEAS 319

11/10    Yuqian Yan, PhD Candidate in Cinema and Media Studies and EALC
“Embodying the Ancient: The Body and its Costume”
Time & location: 3pm in CEAS 319
Co-hosted with the Mass Culture Workshop

11/17    Sohye Kim, PhD Candidate in EALC
“Zhang Lu’s Landing in South Korea: The Fashioning of Spectatorship in a Globalizing and ‘Multicultural’ Society” (working title)
Time & location: 3pm in CEAS 319

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Fall 2016 Schedule

All meetings will be held in Room 319 in the Center for East Asian Studies (CEAS 319).

CEAS is located in the Harris School of Public Policy, 1155 E. 60th St.

9/30 Orientation and Planning Meeting

3:00 – 4:00 PM

10/7 A Conversation with Ryo Kagawa

3:00 – 4:00 PM

10/21 Presenter: Mi-Ryong Shim

Assistant Professor of Korean Literature and Culture, Northwestern University

Title: Aesthetics of New Regionalism and Korean Local Color in the Wartime Japanese Empire

3:00 – 5:00 PM

11/11 Presenter: David Andrew Knight

University of Chicago, co-sponsored with EATRH

Title: “Li Deyu and the Golden Pine”

4:00 – 6:00 PM

11/18 Presenter: Yuqian Yan

Cinema and Media Studies/East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago

Title: “Bringing the Past to the Silver Screen: The Burgeoning of Chinese Costume Films in the 1920s”

3:00 – 5:00 PM

12/1 Presenter: Scott Aalgaard

East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago

Title: “Untimely Voices: Hearing Critique in Japanese Cultural Production”

3:00 – 5:00 PM

William Feeney

Friday, May 20, 3-5 p.m. in CEAS 319 (1155 E 60th St)

Friday, May 20, 3-5 p.m. in CEAS 319 (1155 E 60th St)

William Feeney, “Smiles and Scars”

William Feeney will present a work-in-progress version of one of his dissertation chapters. He summarizes the chapter as follows.

‘Smiles and Scars’ considers the potential for complaints about television to link comedic vulgarity with ijime (bullying) in schools. Ijime emerged as a serious social concern in Japan in the 1980’s and since that time comedy and variety television has been periodically identified as a source of problematic vulgar contagion. This paper opens by exploring oft cited features of ijime before turning to the communicative norms, ideological grounds and social anxieties that render links with comedy television plausible. I argue that inherent difficulty of distinguishing alienating ijime from inclusive teasing among intimates stand as a principle loci of concern that can be tapped to effectively formulate and circulate such links.

A draft of William’s chapter is available at this link. If you have not received the password for the post, or if you have concerns about accessibility, please feel free to contact David Krolikoski at davidkroli at uchicago.edu or Brian White at bmwhite at uchicago.edu.

Junko Yamazaki

Friday, May 6, 2-4 p.m. in CEAS 319 (1155 E 60th St)

Junko Yamazaki, “Reorienting Jidaigeki: Matsumoto Toshio’s Shura (1971)”

Junko Yamazaki, a PhD candidate in Cinema and Media Studies and East Asian Languages and Civilizations will present a work-in-progress version of one of her dissertation chapters. She summarizes the chapter as follows. The workshop will begin and end an hour earlier than normal to accommodate other talks later in the day. 

Once hailed as one of the most important and beautiful films made in Japan since Kurosawa’s prime by film critic Noël Burch, experimental filmmaker, video artist Matusmoto Toshio’s “dark” film Shura (1971) has remained relatively unknown compared to its more playful and lively “white” counterpart, Funeral Parade of Roses (1969). Shot entirely in black-and-white—except for the opening shot—Shura casts its drama on the verge of pitch blackness and invisibility. By offering a genealogy of the relationship between jidaigeki and Japanese avant-garde practices of the 1960s, this chapter challenges the view of the film as Matsumoto’s “turn” from politically engaged avant-garde film to politically disengaged, if not reactionary, jidaigeki (period) film. I argue that Shura’s anachronism is better understood as a hermeneutic challenge than as a political or aesthetic compromise. I will highlight Shura’s engagement with the “modern present” through a discussion of Matsumoto’s conception of spectatorship, and of his interpretation of the kabuki play on which the film is based: Tsuruya Nanboku’s recently revived The Lover’s Pledge. On the formal register, I will highlight Matsumoto’s preference for destabilization over the rejection of narrative as an avant-garde filmmaking strategy, and analyze his deliberate play on spectatorship through the constant reconfiguration of the viewer’s assigned position and orientation within the spatial coordinates of the image. This will enable us to see that Shura is a sophisticated effort to confront the spectator to her hermeneutical situation rather than a reactionary recoil into the “premodern past.”

A draft of Junko’s chapter will be available soon. If you have not received the password for the post, or if you have concerns about accessibility, please feel free to contact David Krolikoski at davidkroli at uchicago.edu or Brian White at bmwhite at uchicago.edu.

Michiyoshi Satō

Michiyoshi Satō, February 9, 5:00 PM-6:30 PM in CEAS 319 (1155 E 60th St.)

Please join us Tuesday, February 9 from 5:00 PM-6:30 PM for a conversation with Michiyoshi Satō, a contemporary Tsugaru-jamisen performer. This event follows Satō’s performance on the previous day, which will be held at Bond Chapel at 6:00 p.m. Catering will be provided at the workshop.

Annotated lyrics in Japanese and English are available via this link. Please do not circulate or cite the lyrics without the permission of Michiyoshi Sato and Joshua Soloman. If you have not received the password for the post, or if you have concerns about accessibility for this meeting, please do not hesitate to email David Krolikoski at davidkroli at uchicago.edu or Brian White at bmwhite at uchicago.edu.

Miriam Wattles

IppSen

Friday, January 29, 4:30-6:30 PM in CWAC 153 (5550 S. Greenwood Ave.)

*PLEASE NOTE THE TIME AND LOCATION OF THIS TALK*

Miriam Wattles, “Defining Manga Anew in 1928: Ippei, a Book, and History”

Please join us this Friday, January 29, as we welcome Miriam Wattles (Associate Professor, History of Art and Architecture, UCSB).  A description of Professor Wattles’s talk follows.  No paper will be pre-circulated.

 

It wasn’t until the explosion of mass media in the 1920s that the word “manga” began to be used for comics and cartoons in Japan. Reformulations of the past were integral to the redefinition of the word. Okamoto Ippei (1886-1948), hugely popular with the public and head of a newly formed manga circle, wove a new historical sensibility into his prescriptions for the future of manga in his book Shin manga no kakikata (How To Make New Manga, 1928). The larger genus he employed was “minshūga,” or “pictures of the people.” In proposing this term at this particular historical moment, Ippei was responding to deep underlying tensions between elite and popular culture, individualism and collectivism, and nationalism and cosmopolitanism. This talk counters present amnesia around Ippei and his definition of manga and gives a surprising history of public ownership of one particular copy of Shin manga no kakikata.

 

This talk is supported by the Visual and Material Perspectives in East Asia Workshop, the Center for East Asian Studies, and Professor Chelsea Foxwell.

 

Catering will be provided after the talk.

 

If you have concerns about accessibility for this meeting, please do not hesitate to contact David Krolikoski at davidkroli at uchicago.edu, Brian White at bmwhite at uchicago.edu, or Xi Zhang at xizh at uchicago.edu.