East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society

February 16, 2015
by wxie
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Feb 24 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

 

“Evolution of the Interindustry Wage Structure in China Since the 1980’s”

 

Belton Fleisher

Professor Emeritus, Department of Economics

Ohio State University

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

February 24, 2015

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract

Industry mean wages in China have exhibited sharply increased dispersion since the early1990s. Researchers have attributed this rising inequality within the industrial wage structure (IWS) to (1) increasingly competitive labor markets leading to better matches between worker pay, worker skills, and employer demands; or (2) residual government control in some industrial sectors that has generated high wages through monopoly rent sharing. We argue that the rise in China’s industrial wage dispersion is primarily attributable to increasingly competitive labor markets which have led to greater returns to schooling and to efficient redistribution of workers across major industry groups. We cannot reject the null hypothesis that the level or changes in government monopoly power has had negligible impact on China’s rising industrial wage dispersion.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Wen Xie (wxie@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

 

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

February 9, 2015
by wxie
0 comments

Feb 10 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

 

 “Global Religious Change, Local Politics, and Civil Life in China and Taiwan”

 

Robert Weller

Professor, Department of Anthropology

Boston University

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

February 10, 2015

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

Abstract

This paper discusses four of the most important global trends as they were accommodated, adjusted, and transformed on both sides of the Taiwan Strait: the removal of religion from politics (secularization), the attempt to confine it to a purely religious sphere (religionization), the increased interest in textual authority and religious self-consciousness (rationalization), and an increase in the direct physical manifestations of belief through unmediated physical experience (embodiment). The current similarities show the relative importance of shared cultural traditions and shared global influences over differing forms of political control. Nevertheless, some significant differences have also appeared in the religious ecology of the two places, especially in the relative importance of local temple worship, Buddhism, and Christianity. One result is that Taiwan’s adaption to global religious change has had much stronger indigenous Chinese roots than we see on the mainland.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Wen Xie (wxie@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

 

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

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