East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society

October 30, 2019
by linzhuoli
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(Oct.30)Junyan Jiang, “Countering Capture: Elite Networks and Government Responsiveness in China’s Land Market Reform”

EAST ASIA WORKSHOP: POLITICS, ECONOMY & SOCIETY Presents

 

“Countering Capture: Elite Networks and Government Responsiveness in China’s Land Market Reform” 

Junyan Jiang

Assistant Professor, Department of Government and Public Administration, Chinese University of Hong Kong

 

 

Oct. 30th, Wed 4:00-5:30 pm [SPECIAL DATE & New Time]

Tea Room, Social Science Research Building (2nd floor).

Refreshments will be provided

 

 

Abstract

Government responsiveness is often viewed as a result of political pressure from the public, but why do politicians facing similar pressure sometimes differ in their responsiveness? This article considers the configurations of elite networks as a key mediating factor. We argue that access to external support networks helps improve politicians’ responsiveness to ordinary citizens by reducing their dependence on vested interests, and test this claim using China’s land market reform as a case. Leveraging novel city-level measures of mass grievances and political networks, we demonstrate that the intensity of land-related grievances is on average positively associated with reform occurrence, but this association is only salient among a subset of city leaders who enjoy informal connections to the higher-level authority. We also show that connected leaders tend to implement policies less congruent with local bureaucratic and business interests. These findings underscore the importance of intra-elite dynamics in shaping mass-elite interactions.

Bio

Junyan Jiang is Assistant Professor at the Department of Government and Public Administration, the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His research interests include elite politics, public opinion, and mass-elite interactions, with a regional focus on China. His work has appeared in journals such as American Journal of Political ScienceComparative Political StudiesGovernanceJournal of Politics, and Political Research Quarterly. He received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of Chicago and was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania between 2016 and 2017.

* Subscribe  to our workshop mailing-list at: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/info/east-asia

* Abstract or description of each presentation will be posted on our website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia

* Questions and comments can be addressed to the student coordinators Yuchen Yang: yucheny@uchicago.edu and Linzhuo Li: linzhuoli@uchicago.edu

*Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinators in advance.

The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences.

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October 21, 2019
by linzhuoli
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(Oct. 21) Lida Nedilsky, “The Liberalizing Role of Hong Kong Startups in Religion and Politics”

EAST ASIA WORKSHOP: POLITICS, ECONOMY & SOCIETY Presents

 

“The Liberalizing Role of Hong Kong Startups in Religion and Politics” 

Lida Nedilsky

Professor of Sociology, North Park University

 

 

Oct. 21st, Mon 4:30-6:00 pm

Tea Room, Social Science Research Building (2nd floor).

Refreshment will be provided

Professor Nedilsky has shared the full paper (see attached) to encourage further discussion and debate.

Nedilsky, Lida – The Liberalizing Role of Hong Kong Startups in Religion and Politics

Lida Nedilsky – The Liberalizing Role of Hong Kong Startups in Religion and Politics

Abstract

Since the territory’s return to Chinese sovereignty, Hong Kong’s executive branch has sought ways to control a relatively free-market society. Dispatching riot police to break up flash mobs from June through August 2019 is one vivid example. Acting as a source of consensual politics is another. In this essay I document a rival to control: the persistent presence of both religious and political startups in Hong Kong’s organizational marketplace. As vehicles of innovation, startups –those entrepreneurial efforts to respond to missed opportunities by fulfilling demands of an untapped market– ought to attract attention in a city with Hong Kong’s global reputation for business. These are the Christian nongovernmental organizations and political parties that populate its public sphere and dislodge the state-society fixity assumed necessary for efficient and stable governance. By placing Christian religious culture in the context of the wider Hong Kong culture I cast it in a new light: one that reveals how Christian entrepreneurialism, like political entrepreneurialism, performs a liberalizing role in Hong Kong.

Bio

Lida V. Nedilsky, Professor of Sociology at North Park University, focuses her research on the intersection of religious and political cultures in Chinese societies. Most recently, she collaborated with historian Joseph Tse-hei Lee of Pace University on a special issue of China Information (July 2019) exploring marginalization in China today. Along with guest-editing, they authored “Marginalization as creative endeavour,” an article spotlighting the innovative possibilities that come with existing on the margins of society –including the margins of academic community and enterprise.

* Subscribe  to our workshop mailing-list at: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/info/east-asia

* Abstract or description of each presentation will be posted on our website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia

* Questions and comments can be addressed to the student coordinators Yuchen Yang: yucheny@uchicago.edu and Linzhuo Li: linzhuoli@uchicago.edu

*Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinators in advance.

The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences.

 

 

 

October 6, 2019
by linzhuoli
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Oct. 7(Monday)|Zeyang Yu, “The Last Strike: Evaluating the Distortionary Effect of Career Incentives on Taxation in China”

EAST ASIA WORKSHOP: POLITICS, ECONOMY & SOCIETY Presents
“The Last Strike: Evaluating the Distortionary Effect of Career Incentives on Taxation in China”

Zeyang Yu

Department of Political Science, University of Chicago

Oct. 7th, Mon 4:30-6:00 pm
Tea Room, Social Science Research Building (2nd floor).
Refreshment will be provided
Abstract
This paper analyzes the distortionary effect of political career incentives on fiscal extraction. We argue that competitive promotion tournaments distort public officials’ career incentives, leading to excessive tax extraction efforts. We empirically estimate the magnitude of distortion by exploiting two institutional designs for political selection in China: the age threshold for promotion and regulated term limits. We find that a promotion tournament becomes more intense when prefectural party leaders enter their last promotion-eligible term (at 50-55 years old). Given fierce competition for career advancement, prefectural party leaders extract excessive fiscal revenue to demonstrate their competence, but they do not enhance economic performance or redistribution efforts.
Bio
Zeyang Yu is a third year PhD student at political science department. His research interests lie broadly in causal inference and their applications in empirical political economy.
 
* Subscribe  to our workshop mailing-list at: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/info/east-asia
* Abstract or description of each presentation will be posted on our website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia
* Questions and comments can be addressed to the student coordinators Yuchen Yang: yucheny@uchicago.edu and Linzhuo Li:linzhuoli@uchicago.edu
*Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinators in advance. 
The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences

 

 

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