March 5 Center for East Asian Studies Presents:

“Women’s Liberation and Art in the

Chinese Cultural Revolution”

Your browser may not support display of this image. Come to a brown bag lunch with

Professor Bai Di

Friday, March 5, 12:30-2:00 pm

Judd Hall, Room 313

Bai Di is the Director of Chinese and Asian Studies at Drew University

She will talk about her own experiences as a participant in the Cultural Revolution and how the heroic images of revolutionary women in art and culture, especially in the model plays, affected her personally and transformed women’s lives in Maoist China.

Bai Di is co-editor of Some of Us: Chinese Women Growing Up in the Mao Era. “This collection of memoirs about the Mao era…offers a counternarrative to the popularly received Red Guards and female victim or sexual repression memoirs found in the West” (from the Introduction).

Sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies

Feb 23

Workshop on East Asia: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

“The Survival and Revival of Religion under Chinese Communist Rule: A Shortage Economy Explanation”

Professor Fenggang Yang

Director, Center on Religion and Chinese Society, Purdue University

4:00-5:30pm, Tuesday

February 23, 2010

Pick Lounge

5828 South University Ave.

Workshop website: http://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Jean Lin (jeanlin@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Cheol-sung Lee, Dingxin Zhao

The workshop is sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies and the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance, please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Abstract:

Religions in China survived eradication measures in the 1960s and 1970s and have been reviving despite restrictive regulations and frequent crackdowns in the reform era since the late 1970s.  This is totally at odds with the classic secularization theories that predict religious decline and demise along with modernization.  Nor is the currently dominant supply-side economic theory adequate to explain the failure of religious suppression in Communist-ruled China.  Instead, I propose a political economy explanation.  Borrowing János Kornai’s economics of shortage regarding consumer behaviors, I argue that the religious changes in China are predominately driven by the rising demand for religion.

The Reading can be downloaded here:

Yang, Fenggang. 2009. “Religion in China under Communism: A Shortage Economy Explanation.” The Journal of Church and State 52 (1). http://jcs.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/csp042?ijkey=Uqi4S7LEUQJLhcz&keytype=ref

Feb 9 Workshop

Workshop on East Asia:

Politics, Economy and Society Presents

Economic development of ethnic minority regions in China

Dongmei Zhang

Visiting Scholar, School of Economics, Minzu University of China (The Central University for Nationalities)

4:00-5:30pm, Tuesday

February 9, 2010

Pick Lounge

5828 South University Ave.

Workshop website: http://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Jean Lin (jeanlin@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Cheol-sung Lee, Dingxin Zhao

The workshop is sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies and the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance, please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Abstract:

Economic development of ethnic minority regions in China

The pace of industrial economic development has been increasing in recent years in ethnic minority regions in China. Zhang Dongmei, a visiting scholar from Minzu University of China, will present the results of her research on the economic development of ethnic minority regions (Guangxi, Inner mongolia, Xinjiang, Ningxia, Tibet, Qinghai, Guizhou and Yunnan). The first part of her talk will be on the natural and social environment of these regions which on the one hand is the foundation of the economic development of ethnic minority regions, but on the other hand is also a kind of constraint. The second part analyzes the general picture of present situation of economic development in ethnic minority regions. The third part lists the main problems facing the economic development of ethnic minority regions. The fourth part focuses on the industrial development in ethnic minority regions.