May 29th Workshop

Workshop on East Asia: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

“Grassroots Protest Leadership in China:
State-Leader Dynamics and Movement Outcomes”

Presenter: Jean Lin

Doctoral Candidate of Sociology

University of Chicago

4:00-5:30pm, Tuesday

May 29, 2012

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

Abstract

My study aims to understand what has contributed to the differentiated outcomes of protest activities in China by looking at three cases of community environmental protests in Beijing. Although being same-issue protests, the outcomes of these movements greatly varied, resulting in repression, cooptation, and acceptance. I argue that leadership and leadership strategies were crucial in determining the outcomes of these protests, and the dynamics of state-leader interactions mutually created crucial junctures in the protests which largely contributed to differentiated protest outcomes.

I found that leadership strategies in these three protests led to different patterns of interactions and these strategies served as switches that switched on and off certain structural constraints or openings available to the leaders. Initial leadership strategies are crucial determinants in setting a specific relationship with the state, later strategies also matter, but primary interactions are the key in shaping movement processes and outcomes. Moreover, I examine the dynamics of state-leader relationships and how leadership strategies crucially pattern this dynamic and influence movement outcomes. I seek to go beyond the structure vs. agency problem, and improve upon existing explanations by incorporating a relational analysis that takes into account time and identify turning points in movement processes that demonstrated to be crucial in defining the nature and future development of the protests.

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Yang Zhang (yangzhang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang and Dingxin Zhao

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance, please contact the student coordinator in advance.

May 15 Workshop

“Detour of Translation:
Structuration of Brokers and the Crystallization of Modern Political and Social Terms in Chinese, 1890-1930”

Presenter: Le Lin
Doctoral Student of Sociology
University of Chicago

4:00-5:30pm, Tuesday
May 15, 2012
Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

Abstract
This nascent project probes the way in which Western modern social and political terms were translated into and crystallized in Chinese from 1890s to 1920s. I ask why, given the existence of several competing Chinese translation versions and leading Chinese translators’ opposition to the Japanese version, such version from Japanese was accepted and had become the dominant version by 1920s. Several existing explanations are examined. I suggest shifting our focus to the structuration of brokers—the relative and dynamic structure of each version’s carriers in promoting their version. Initial explorations of causal mechanisms regarding the structruation of brokers’ knowledge system, organizational capacity and affinity with the rising power are discussed. Finally, I point to the potential theoretical linkages and significance of this research.

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/
Student coordinator: Yang Zhang (yangzhang@uchicago.edu)
Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang and Dingxin Zhao

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance, please contact the student coordinator in advance.