East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society

October 29, 2009
by campus
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Nov. 6 Special Session

Workshop on East Asia: Politics, Economy and Society ~Presents~

Socialism is Great!:

From Rocket Factory Girl to International Media

Lijia Zhang

Now a writer, journalist, social commentator and a TV show host, Zhang Lijia spent a decade in the 80’s working in a Nanjing factory, that produced inter-continental missiles capable of reaching North America.  To escape from the repressive routine, she taught herself English.  Her journey from a disillusioned worker to organizer in support of the Tiananmen Square demonstrators illuminates the sea-changes sweeping China in the reform era.  Lijia will discuss her book, her personal experiences of change in China over the past three decades, and her thoughts on China’s position in the world today.

4:00-5:30pm, FRIDAY (special session)

November 6, 2009

Pick Lounge

5828 South University Ave.

Workshop website: http://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Jean Lin (jeanlin@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Cheol-sung Lee, Dingxin Zhao (on leave)

The workshop is sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies and the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences.

October 24, 2009
by campus
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Nov. 3 Workshop

Workshop on East Asia:

Politics, Economy and Society Presents

Rumor and secret space: the Tianjin Massacre

Xiaoli Tian

PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology, University of Chicago

4:00-5:30pm, Tuesday

November 3, 2009

Pick Lounge

5828 South University Ave.

Workshop website: http://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Jean Lin (jeanlin@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Cheol-sung Lee, Dingxin Zhao

The workshop is sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies and the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance, please contact the student coordinator in advance.


Abstract:

This paper uses the case of anti-missionary rumors that
prevailed in 19th-century China to explore how rumor is
produced in a particular social context. Relying on archival
sources, especially those related to the investigations of
the Tianjin Massacre, I show that those rumors were framed
in spatial concepts. Rather than political conflicts, the
medical practice conducted by missionaries provided
materials for rumor production. Furthermore, the rumors were
not caused by deliberate hiding of information, but rather
by the fact that the spatial arrangements of medical
missionaries’ daily activities— the spatial distribution of
activities, the accessibility of space, and the spatial
placement of people—contradicted the endogenous spatial
settings in 19th-century China and therefore made the
acquiring of correct information impossible. Thus, these
rumors were the result of the confrontation of two ways of
understanding of space.

October 15, 2009
by campus
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Special Monday Session: Oct. 19

Workshop on East Asia:

Politics, Economy and Society Presents

“A New Religious Ecology in Crystallization: The Wane of Indigenous Religions and the Rise of Protestant Christianity in the Reform-era China”

Yanfei Sun

Department of Sociology, University of Chicago

4:00-5:30pm, MONDAY (special session)

October 19, 2009

Pick Lounge

5828 South University Ave.

Workshop website: http://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Jean Lin (jeanlin@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Cheol-sung Lee, Dingxin Zhao (on leave)

The workshop is sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies and the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance, please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Abstract:

Protestant Christianity is the fastest growing religion in the Reform-era China. Looking at various Protestant groups in a County in Zhejiang Province, this study finds that they enjoy different growth rates and possess different levels of strength.  To explain the differences, I probe into three sets of vital factors, namely, the ideas, practices, and organizational structures of the religious groups, their social environment—whether they are embedded in a rural or urban setting, and the groups’ relations with the state.

October 2, 2009
by campus
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October 6 Workshop

Workshop on East Asia:

Politics, Economy and Society Presents


“Incubating Innovation or Cultivating Corruption? The Developmental State and Life Sciences in Asia”


Professor Cheol-Sung Lee

Department of Sociology, University of Chicago


4:00-5:30pm, Tuesday

October 6, 2009

Pick Lounge

5828 South University Ave.


Workshop website: http://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Jean Lin (jeanlin@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Cheol-sung Lee, Dingxin Zhao

The workshop is sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies and the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance, please contact the student coordinator in advance.


Abstract:

A substantial body of literature purports to document the
growth of scientific misconduct in Northeast Asia.  This
paper traces the apparent growth of research fraud and
falsification to two distinct features of the national
innovation systems common to the region: liberal research
regimes adopted by developmental states and marked by
freedom from government oversight; and illiberal laboratory
cultures imported from Germany and marked by all-powerful
lab directors and their vulnerable underlings. Based on
comparative, qualitative case studies of pioneering
countries in bio-medical research, as well as cross-national
quantitative analyses of the permissiveness of national stem-
cell research policies, we argue that Asia’s scientific
pathologies are the products of institutional factors:
funding and freedom offered to scientists by developmental
states; and the lack of informal control prevalent in the
German model of higher education. We conclude that, while
Northeast Asian officials offer their biomedical researchers
funding and freedom to take advantage of opportunities that
rarely exist  in the West, their scientists stifle open
debate and criticism, and thereby hinder  the growth of
informal as well as formal control mechanisms that are
critical for deterring and detecting scientific fraud.

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