Jan 28 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

 

How the Internet Affects Overseas Chinese Political Activism in China

David Benson

PhD candidate, Department of Political Science

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

January 28, 2014

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract
Political activism in China is an important and well-studied phenomenon. One less well understood aspect of Chinese political activism, however, are overseas activists within the Overseas expatriate community. Innovations in communication technology, such as the internet, have recently made communication over great distances comparatively cheap. The decrease in cost of long distance communication has led some observers to conclude that the overseas community might be able to capitalize on their locations, utilizing cheap long-distance communication to affect political change in China. This article, which forms a summary of several sections of my dissertation which are still in development, examines the role of the internet in mobilizing overseas Chinese for activism within China. I argue that because transnational activism is inherently high-risk, with low probability of reward, most transnational activists are parts of robust social groups which provide social and emotional motives and support for the high risk activism. Since robust social networks are a function of strong ties, which are usually built in person, the increase in weak ties, over the internet, will have little effect on the generation of real world political activity. However, pre-existing groups will be able to utilize new media communications to their own advantage, just not to increase real-world political activism.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Junyan Jiang (junyanjiang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for East Asian Studies, and the Confucius Institute. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Jan 14 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

 

Migration, Child Development and Government Policy in China

Rebecca Myerson

PhD candidate, Harris School of Public Policy

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

January 14, 2014

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract
According to recent estimates, there are over 260 million people migrating for work within China, and about 70% of their children live apart from one or both parents. Due to the unique hukou (residential permit) system in China, access to government social services for children varies widely by location and migration status. In order to capture how parents make migration decisions and the implications for child development and policy, I developed a simple structural model based on the Solon (2004) extension of Becker and Tomes (1979). In the model, parents care about their own current consumption and their child’s future earnings; they can choose between three migration scenarios (migrating and bringing their child, migrating and leaving their child behind, or staying in the rural area), and they can choose their levels of time and monetary investments in their child. I analyzed possible changes in government policy and corresponding parental reactions including changes in migration, time and monetary investment. More detailed predictions can be developed in future drafts. I find that possible changes in government policy vary in their effects on rural hukou children. Increasing government monetary investment in children in rural areas does not necessarily yield a positive influence on them. In contrast, raising governmental support for migrant children in urban areas increases parental time investment without decreasing total monetary investment in children, and is the best policy considered in this paper.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Junyan Jiang (junyanjiang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for East Asian Studies, and the Confucius Institute. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Dec 3 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

Endogenous Altruism: Theory and Evidence from Chinese Twins

 

Junjian Yi

Post-doctoral Fellow, Department of Economics

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

December 3, 2013

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract
In this paper, I investigate the endogenous formation of inter-sibling altruism and its implications for intra-household investment in children’s human capital. The theoretical analysis shows that parental fostering of inter-sibling altruism during childhood serves as a device to ameliorate commitment constraints within families. The increase in inter-sibling altruism enhances total returns from intra-household investment in children’s human capital by allocating more resources to better-endowed children, and decreases inequality in the distribution of consumption among children via inter-sibling transfers. Theoretical predictions are supported by the empirical results that are based on the Chinese longitudinal child twin survey. I find that parents are more likely to educate their children to be altruistic toward one another when gaps in children’s prenatal endowments are larger. Given gaps in prenatal endowments, parents invest more in better-endowed children’s human capital when they educate their children to be more altruistic. When parents have more children, they educate children to be more altruistic. Hence, parental investment becomes more likely to reinforce gaps in children’s prenatal endowments in larger families. The empirical results suggest that the literature understates the degree of parental aversion to inequality among their children because of the omission of inter-sibling altruism.

 

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Junyan Jiang (junyanjiang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for East Asian Studies, and the Confucius Institute. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.