Nov 5 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

Authoritarian Resilience Under Crisis: Geography and Redistribution in China

Jeremy Wallace

Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science

Ohio State University

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

November 5, 2013

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract
How do authoritarian regimes survive economic crises? Contrary to modernization theory, analyses show that economic growth aids regime survival, while regimes are much more likely to end during crises. While different types of nondemocratic regimes and institutions account for much of the variation in regime survival, the policies that shape the political economy of these regimes have received less attention. Why did the global financial crisis and ensuing Great Recession not generate the political instability in China that many predicted? I argue that China’s success in weathering the storm was partly due to its long-term strategy of managed urbanization and migration paired with a short-term economic stimulus. These factors combined to structure, disperse, and reduce discontent generated by the Great Recession. Fearing instability and unrest among newly unemployed migrant workers along the coast, the regime sought to encourage employment in the interior. Along with continued collective ownership of land in the countryside and the hukou system, the fiscal stimulus facilitated stability by providing channels for those negatively affected by the crisis to return to the countryside and smaller cities in the interior, dispersing discontent. While the fiscal stimulus continued the regime’s pro-rural, pro-interior development policy, at the height of the crisis, the regime also vastly expanded loans to urban industries in contrast to its general move away from urban bias. The analysis demonstrates the utility of in-depth investigation of the threats that regimes face and their policy responses to those threats.

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Junyan Jiang (junyanjiang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for East Asian Studies, and the Confucius Institute. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Oct 22 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

Mono to Dual Nationality: Restructuring the Legal Boundaries of Citizenship in Japan and Korea

Naeyun Lee

Ph.D Candidate, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

Oct 22, 2013

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

 

Abstract
Many scholars have noted the growing incongruence between the actual resident population and the national self-perception in liberal democratic states. Previous studies on the expansion of citizenship to non-citizens have attributed such changes to the global human rights regime, activist jurors and client politics, and the dynamics of policy-making. However, discussions on citizenship often neglect the recent increase in the number of countries that tolerate dual citizenship. In this paper, I use dual citizenship as an analytic tool to discuss the divergent paths that the two countries, Korea and Japan, have taken to realign their monoethnic nationality with the rapidly changing demographics of the state. By expanding the scope of analysis to non-Western countries, I attempt to test out whether convergence toward an international mean occurs in citizenship policies. I find that the preexisting theories of globalists and liberal-democratic accounts fail to provide adequate explanations on the sudden launch of a partial dual citizenship system in Korea in 2010 and the lack of political interest in Japan. I call for a closer look at the bureaucratic structure of the government as well as political regimes as key factors in inducing legal reforms in the citizenship laws.

 

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Junyan Jiang (junyanjiang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for East Asian Studies, and the Confucius Institute. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Oct 8 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society Presents

Plural Interests, Political Affiliation and Parochial Identity: Explaining Popular Approval of Local Governments in China

Junyan Jiang

Ph.D Candidate, Department of Political Science

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

Oct 8, 2013

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract
Compared to how much we know about public opinion in democracies, very little is known about how governments are viewed and evaluated by citizens in authoritarian regimes. We develop an integrated model to explain popular approval of local governments in China based on three key factors: economic performance, political affiliation and leadership characteristics. We test our hypotheses against so far the largest dataset on Chinese local public opinion using a multilevel regression method. Our analysis yields three main findings: First, we find that expression of political preferences is heavily conditioned on socioeconomic status. High income group and urban residents display radically different preferences from the poor and the rural with respect to both investment and fiscal expansion. These disagreements interact with distinct policy portfolios of local governments to produce diverging performance evaluations. Second, political affiliation has an important but nonlinear effect on performance evaluation. While Party members and government-sector employees tend to be more supportive, public-sector employees give the lowest evaluations in the sample. Finally, in the absence of explicit partisan cues or other political cleavages, local leaders’ demographic attributes serves as a powerful cue when citizens are making evaluations.  Governments headed by local natives tend to receive much higher rating than those headed by outsiders, and female citizens show greater support in localities headed by female leaders.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Junyan Jiang (junyanjiang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Center for East Asian Studies, and the Confucius Institute. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.