May 7 Workshop

“US-China Business Relations in an Era of New Leadership”

 

Doug Guthrie

Dean, Professor of Management and International Business

George Washington University School of Business

 

 4:30-6pm, Tuesday

May 7, 2013

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

 

Abstract
As the “factory for the world,” for years China has been regarded as an economic success, albeit one that has taken its position in the global economy primarily through the advantages of a deep, cheap labor pool. It is often dismissed as a rival to US dominance in areas of innovation or rational market infrastructure. This view is short-sighted, as it overstates the strengths of the US economy and ignores some of the most interesting aspects of Chinese economic development over the last three decades. I will argue that the case can be made that China’s approach to building a capitalist economy is more equipped for the challenges of the 21st Century than our own. Indeed, it is one of the great ironies of our time that the largest (so-called) “Communist” government of the world oversees the world’s most dynamic capitalist economy.

 

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Le Lin (lelin2010@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

April 23 Workshop

“The Politics of ‘Compliant Defiance’ in China”

 

Marie-Eve Reny

Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Political Science

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6:00pm, Tuesday

April 23, 2013

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract
Abstract: During the past decade, the literature on resistance in China has paid predominant heed to citizens’ resort to the law, grassroots elections, petitions and disruptive mobilization to challenge local governance and seek the central government’s help in rectifying perceived injustices. The scholarship has nevertheless revived tendencies by early studies of resistance to conceptualize the latter as overt and outright, and to treat defiance and quiescence as dichotomous. More attention should be dedicated to citizens who refrain from mobilizing overtly, and how they have challenged state authority. This paper explores how a silent majority of underground pastors negotiate their autonomy with local public security bureaus in various cities, using a strategy of “compliant defiance.” The latter consists of defying central-level policies (i.e. religious co-optation) while trading conciliation with local authorities in exchange for protection. Conciliation involves pastors’ maintenance of a low profile politically, sharing information about churches’ internal affairs with public security officers, and the occasional use of bribes to pay key officials respect. Compliant defiance constitutes an effective tactic for the tacit negotiation of underground churches’ autonomy in a policy area that is highly sensitive from a central government standpoint, and where the costs of pressing for formal institutional change are high.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Le Lin (lelin2010@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

April 9 Workshop

A Theory of Protest Leadership:

Elites and the Mass in Workers’ Resistance in China

 

Xi Chen

Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

 

4:30-6pm, Tuesday

April 9, 2013

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract

    During the industrial restructuring in China since the 1990s, tens of millions of workers and pensioners in state-owned enterprises suffered from massive lay-offs and pension arrears. While they have become one of the most combative social groups in China, their collective protests have seldom been effective. This paper investigates a fundamental barrier to their collective action – the vulnerability of the relationship between protest leaders and rank-and-file workers. The motivations of protest leaders played a central role in sustaining collective action, but their special interest can raise other workers’ suspicion especially when local authorities have tried to buy off the leaders. The decline of community life in restructured enterprises has also reduced social capital, and exacerbated workers’ mistrust of protest leaders. The paper thus sheds light on how government co-optation and a transformed urban space have shaped and constrained popular collective action in China.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Le Lin (lelin2010@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Dali Yang, Dingxin Zhao and Zheng Michael Song

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Spring 2013 Schedule

Except for May 28, the workshop meets on alternate Tuesdays 4:00-5:30pm at Pick Lounge

April 9 (starts at 4:30pm)

“A Theory of Protest Leadership: Elites and the Mass in Workers’ Resistance in China”

 Xi Chen

 Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science

 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

April 23

“The Politics of ‘Compliant Defiance’ in China”

 Marie-Eve Reny

 Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Political Science

 University of Chicago

May 7

“US-China Business Relations in an Era of New Leadership”

Doug Guthrie

Dean, Professor of Management and International Business

George Washington University School of Business

May 21

“What Make a Judicial Decision Convincing: Experimental Evidence of Authority, Bias and Reasoning from China”

Zhuang Liu

LLM Candidate, University of Chicago Law School

PhD Candidate, Peking University Law School

May 28

“From Revolutionary Secrete Society to State:

An Analytical Framework to Explain the Dynamics in Chinese Communist Revolution”

Jin Xu

PhD Student, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

    The workshop meets on alternate Tuesdays 4:00-5:30pm at Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Avenue. Abstracts are available on our website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/. Questions and comments should be addressed to the coordinator Le Lin: lelin2010@uchicago.edu

    Faculty Sponsors:

    Dali Yang (Political Science), daliyang@uchicago.edu

Dingxin Zhao (Sociology), dzhao@uchicago.edu

Zheng Michael Song (BoothSchool of Business), Zheng.Song@chicagobooth.edu