Dec 2, Zhiwei Tong, “The Road Leading to Independent Trial in China”

“The Road Leading to Independent Trial in China”

Zhiwei Tong

Professor of law

East China University of Political Science and Law

12:15-1:20 p.m., Wednesday, December 2, 2015

Room E, 1111 East 60th Street.

The Chinese Constitution (Art. 126) prescribes: “The people’s courts shall, in accordance with the law, exercise judicial power independently and are not subject to interference by administrative organs, public organizations or individuals.” For decades, how has this provision of the Constitution been enforced? And how to “ensure that judicial bodies exercises their judicial powers fairly and independently”? Professor Zhiwei Tong will discuss some fundamental issues in the reform of the Chinese judicial system, such as the reasons the Chinese judicial system lacks the necessary authoritativeness; the de facto position of a court in the pyramid-like hierarchy of the unified State-Party structure; the reasons China’s justice has no sufficient credibility and what can and cannot be changed in China’s judicial reform; could the courts or judges be tolerated holding a neutral position? Professor Tong will give his assessment of the current project designed for judicial reform in China and discuss the prospects of the reform.

This event is sponsored by the University of Chicago Law School International Programs, the China Law Society, and the East Asia Workshop. This event is free and open to the public, but seating may be limited. Please contact Aican Nguyen at aican@uchicago.edu with any questions or concerns.

Dec 1, Belton Fleisher, “Wages versus Amenities in the Growth of Secondary Industry Employment”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

“Wages versus Amenities in the Growth of Secondary Industry Employment”

(with William H. McGuire and Nicholas C. Holtkamp)

Belton Fleisher

Professor Emeritus, Department of Economics

Ohio State University

4:30-6:00 p.m., Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

Abstract

We examine the expansion of manufacturing industry in China from the provinces that were the manufacturing powerhouses of the 1990s to adjacent provinces in the Coastal and Inland regions. We concentrate on industry in provinces outside of the Northeast, where the concentration of SOE heavy manufacturing declined sharply as the result of reforms in the 1990s and focus on the questions: a) Do rising wages in manufacturing stimulate relocation of employment to lower-wage regions? b) Is location of employment more sensitive to wages, to worker human capital, or amenities such as infrastructure and Special Economic Zones? c) Identification of the causal roles of wages, human capital, and infrastructure amenities is complicated by endogeneity of human capital through return migration of skilled workers, location of SEZs to areas with better-educated workforce and access to transportation infrastructure, and the impact of rising labor demand on wage rates in expansion areas. We use several alternative estimation strategies and despite endogeneity issues. We find a fairly robust evidence of an elasticity of demand for employment with respect to real wage of approximately -0.2. The estimated impact of education as measured by proportion of workforce with schooling at least junior high school is large and robust, although smaller and less precisely estimated in the presence of the SEZ variables. The presence of Special Economic Zones organized at the national level has a significant, positive impact on secondary industry employment, and there is no evidence of cross-provincial crowing out of industry expansion.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Yan Xu (xuyan@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Xi Song, Dali Yang and Dingxin Zhao

 

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Nov 17, Junyan Jiang, “Inter-Generational Power Sharing and Institutionalization of Leadership Succession in China”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

“Inter-Generational Power Sharing and Institutionalization of Leadership Succession in China”

(coauthored with Yang Zhang)

Junyan Jiang

PhD Candidate, Department of Political Science

University of Chicago

5:00-6:30p.m., Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

 

Abstract

The ability to conduct regular, peaceful leadership succession is one of the key features that distinguish democracies from autocracies. Yet China is among a handful of authoritarian regimes that have defied this conventional distinction and managed to institutionalize a transition order that has persisted for several decades. What explained its success? We argue that an important contributing factor is the unique practice of “inter-generational power sharing”, in which political power, especially the authority to appoint key personnel, is divided between the outgoing dictator and his successor. We provide a theory of why this arrangement can mitigate the monitoring and credible commitment problems among the elites and develop predictions about the patterns of power sharing that will emerge. Using a large biographical database of Chinese political elites from multiple levels between 2000-2015, we show that outgoing leaders retained strong control over the immediate appointments of top elites (to the Politburo) even after they formally stepped down, whereas the successor’s influence is concentrated at appointing middle- and lower-level elites (at the provincial and deputy provincial levels). Analyses of topic distribution in a dataset of informal conversations further confirm the centrality of personnel matters in elite interactions.

 

 

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Yan Xu (xuyan@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Xi Song, Dali Yang and Dingxin Zhao

 

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.