East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society

February 17, 2017
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February 23, Thomas Dubois, “Opiate of the Masses with Chinese Characteristics”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 “Opiate of the Masses with Chinese Characteristics – Interpreting China’s Religion Policy”

Thomas DuBois

Associate Professor, College of Asia and the Pacific.

Australian National University

4:30-6:00p.m., Thursday, February 23, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

Late in 2016, China released its newly revised Religious Affairs Law, which was immediately panned by critics as an aggressive intrusion into protected religious freedoms. In fact, the law is hardly new. It is consistent with the very specific way that the Communist Party has interpreted religious freedoms in the decades since the 1982 promulgation of “Basic Ideas and Policies Concerning Our Country’s Religious Question in the Socialist Era” initiated a more apparently tolerant stance. The talk traces the development of Chinese religion policy over three decades, closing with a discussion of the new law, and the recent rapprochement between China and the Vatican.

About the Speaker

Thomas DuBois is a historian of modern China.  His research focuses on Chinese religion and society, with a particular interest in northeast China. His publications include Sacred Village: Social Change and Religious Life in Rural North China (Hawaii, 2005), Casting Faiths: Imperialism and the Transformation of Religion in East and Southeast Asia (Palgrave, 2009), Religion and the Making of Modern East Asia (Cambridge, 2011), and most recently, Empire and the Meaning of Religion in Northeast Asia: Manchuria 1900-1945 (Cambridge, 2017). His research has also been featured in the Huffington Post and New York Times. Prof. DuBois received his undergraduate degree from University of Chicago and Ph.D. from UCLA.

* To learn more about our Winter program, please look at: Winter Schedule

 

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology),  Dali Yang (Political Science), and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


This particular East Asia Workshop event is sponsored by the Committee on Chinese Studies at the Center for East Asian Studies and East Asian Languages and Civilizations. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

February 17, 2017
by yxz
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February 21, Dingxin Zhao, “Social change of the Longue Duree”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 Social Change of the Longue Duree: A theory and its application”

Dingxin Zhao

Max Palevsky Professor, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

This talk presents a general theory of social change proposed in my new book “Confucian-Legalist State.” The theory is based on the premise that human nature has political, ideological, territorial and economic aspects, and humans compete for dominance and try to institutionalize the gains along these aspects. The bulk of the theory is to analyze how each of the four aspects of human nature has given rise to distinctive mechanisms and institutions shaping the contours of history. The empirical implications of the theory will be illustrated by the patterns of the world history, particularly the premodern history of China and Europe. More specifically, I will try to explain why China was able to achieve a unified and bureaucratic empire in the Qin Dynasty (221-206 BCE), and why the imperial/cultural structure emerging during the Qin and Han Dynasties showed great resilience, despite the challenges brought by nomadic conquests, population growth, technological changes, commercial growth, the rise of new ideas and religions, up until the rise of the West in the 19th century.

About the Speaker

Professor Dingxin Zhao is Max Palevsky Professor of Sociology at the University of Chicago. He is interested in political sociology broadly defined, as well as comparative historical sociology, sociology of emotion, ecological sociology, sociological theory and methodology. Prof. Zhao is the author of The Power of Tiananmen: State-Society Relations and the 1989 Beijing Student Movement, and most recently: The Confucian-Legalist State: A New Theory of Chinese History.  Prof. Zhao holds a B.A. from Fudan University, a Ph.D. in Entomology and also a Ph.D. in Sociology from McGill University.

* To learn more about our Winter program, please look at: Winter Schedule

 

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), Dali Yang (Political Science), and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

 

February 8, 2017
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February 14, Wei Shen, “Interplay between Centralized Judicial Control and Local Protectionism”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 Interplay between Centralized Judicial Control and Local Protectionism

Empirical Study of China Supreme People’s Court’s Decisions

on Non-enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards (1995-2015)”

Wei Shen

Dean and Professor of Law, Law School

Shandong University

4:30-6:00 p.m., Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

In an effort to fight against local protectionism in court enforcement proceedings, China’s Supreme People’s Court promulgated its Notice on Relevant Issues Pertaining to the People’s Court Handling Foreign and Foreign-Related Arbitration in 1995. Pursuant to this Notice, China’s Intermediate People’s Courts will have to wait until the Supreme People’s Court’s approval of its decision not to enforce any foreign or foreign-related arbitral award. However, the effectiveness of this internal reporting mechanism in constraining local protectionism has never been empirically tested. This empirical study, based on 98 publicly available non-enforcement reply opinions rendered by China’s Supreme People’s Court to lower courts after those lower courts have made and reported preliminary non-enforcement decisions up to the Supreme People’s Court, analyzes whether these non-enforcement decisions have shown any pattern of local protectionism. Although statistical results do not suggest that local protectionism has been a major barrier hindering effective enforcement of foreign or foreign-related arbitral awards in China, we argue that this internal reporting system may also serve other functions. For instance, it provides an alternative tool to reinforce judicial oversight in spite of China’s weak appellant system. At the same time, the Chinese government seems to rely on this internal reporting system to achieve important policy goals. In this sense, analyzing the functionality of this internal reporting system offers us insights of the role top-level judicial control could play China without an independent court system.

About the Speaker

Professor Shen is a Global Professor of Law at New York University School of Law, an associate member of the International Academy of Comparative Law, a member of Moody’s China Academic Advisory Panel, and an Honorary Fellow of Asian Institute of International Financial Law, University of Hong Kong, and has been included in Marquis Who’s Who (2011 onwards). Professor Shen is also a leading expert on international commercial arbitration. He is an arbitrator with Hong Kong International Arbitration Centre, Singapore International Arbitration Centre, Shanghai International Arbitration Centre, among others.

Professor Shen authored seven books, the most recent of which are Shadow Banking in China: Risk, Regulation and Policy (Edward Elgar 2016), and Chinese Business Law: Narrative and Commentary (Wolters Kluwer 2016).  He also serves as an editor of multiple journals, including the Chinese Journal of International Law (SSCI, Oxford University Press) and Journal of East Asia and International Law (SSCI).

Prior to teaching at the law school, Professor Shen practiced in major US and UK firms in Shanghai, Chicago and Hong Kong for a decade. Professor Shen holds a PhD from London School of Economics and Political Science and L.L.M from University of Cambridge and University of Michigan.

* Our full Winter 2017 schedule is available at: Winter Schedule 

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), Dali Yang (Political Science), and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

February 5, 2017
by yxz
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February 7, Rory Truex, “Authoritarian Gridlock? Haste and Delay in the Chinese Legislative System.”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

Authoritarian Gridlock? Haste and Delay in the Chinese Legislative System.”

Rory Truex

Assistant Professor, Department of Politics and Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

Princeton University

4:30-6:00 p.m., Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

Policy gridlock is often viewed as a uniquely democratic phenomenon. The checks and balances that produce gridlock are absent from authoritarian systems, leading many observers to romanticize “authoritarian efficiency” and policy dynamism. This paper develops a theory that relates authoritarian policy change to the presence of “soft vetoes” within the ruling coalition and citizen attention shocks. A unique law-level dataset from the Chinese case shows that roughly one third of laws are not passed within the period specified in legislative plans, and about 10% of laws take over ten years to pass. Qualitative analysis of China’s Food Safety Law, coupled with shadow case studies of two other laws, demonstrates the plausibility of the theory.

About the Speaker

Rory Truex is Assistant Professor of Politics and Public Affairs. His research focuses on Chinese politics and theories of authoritarian rule. His book Making Autocracy Work: Representation and Responsiveness in Modern China investigates the nature of representation in authoritarian systems, specifically the politics surrounding China’s National People’s Congress. His research has also been featured in the Wall Street Journal and New York Times. Currently, Prof. Truex is working on a new project exploring whether Chinese citizens believe state-controlled newspapers, the temporal determinants of dissident behavior and crackdowns, and new ways to measure public opinion. Prof. Truex received his undergraduate degree from Princeton in 2007 and Ph.D. in political science from Yale in 2014.

*To see the full Winter 2017 schedule: Winter Schedule

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology) Dali Yang (Political Science) Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


This particular East Asia Workshop event is sponsored by the Committee on Chinese Studies at the Center for East Asian Studies and with support from a Title VI National Resource Center Grant from the United States Department of Education. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

February 5, 2017
by yxz
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January 24, Linzhuo Li, “Politics Beyond the Ocean: Ideological upheaval and community metabolism in China’s cyber space”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

  Politics Beyond the Ocean: Ideological upheaval and community metabolism in China’s cyber space”

Linzhuo Li

PhD student, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

This research analyzes the political debates of U.S. Presidential Election on “Zhihu”, one of China’s top online knowledge sharing communities and aims to explain why the dominant voices in the community turned from pro-liberal before the election to pro-conservative after. Using community detection methods, the research discovers three ideologically distinct groups: pro-liberal, pro-conservative, and mixed-nationalism. The research also finds that the ideological divergence corresponds with user’s community status. The pro-liberal group is mainly of “big VIP” users, featuring a friendship network while the pro-conservative group has mostly ordinary users, featuring a mobilization network. Finally, by tracing the interactions among key answerers and their user life histories, the research tries to form an explanation based on community politics and user metabolism to understand this online political upheaval.

About the Speaker

Linzhuo Li is a 3rd year PhD student in the Department of Sociology. He is interested in using network analysis and content analysis to understand dynamics of online community. He is also interested in sociology of finance, especially about local financial transformation in China, a project that may take him several years to finish. In addition, he is currently also involved in a computational content analysis project, with his colleague Shilin Jia, tracking changing economic rhetoric in 60 years of the People’s Daily.

*To see the full Winter 2017 schedule: Winter Schedule

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology) Dali Yang (Political Science) Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

 

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