East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society

January 27, 2020
by linzhuoli
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(Jan. 30) Yanfei Sun, “Empires and Religious Toleration”

EAST ASIA WORKSHOP: POLITICS, ECONOMY & SOCIETY Presents

 

“Empires and Religious Toleration 

Yanfei Sun

Associate Professor of Sociology, Zhejiang University

UChicago Sociology Alumni

 

Jan. 30th, Thu 5:00-6:30 pm (NEW TIME FOR WINTER QUARTER!)

Tea Room, Social Science Research Building (2nd floor).

Refreshments will be provided

Abstract

Recent scholarship of pre-modern empires likes to compare them with modern nation-states and stresses the propensity of pre-modern empires to tolerate diverse religions and cultures in their own territories. This emphasis, however, belies the fact that the religious policies of pre-modern empires differ significantly: some indeed allowed all kinds of religions to exist and flourish, while others persecuted heretics and non-believers, and carried out forced conversions. In this talk,I examine the religious policies of 23 pre-modern Eurasian empires and rank them into six different tiers according to their degree of toleration towards non-state religions. I argue against the existing theory that highlights state capacity of empires as the key to explain their different degree of religious toleration and instead stress the nature of the state religion and the related state-religion relations as the key to explanation. I found that pre-modern empires associated with a state religion that had a zero-sum mentality towards other religions and a strong drive to convert people tended to adopt intolerant policies towards other religions. Among these empires, those whose political power was more circumscribed by the power of the state religion are found to be even more religiously intolerant.

* Subscribe  to our workshop mailing-list at: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/info/east-asia

* Abstract or description of each presentation will be posted on our website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia

* Questions and comments can be addressed to the student coordinators Yuchen Yang: yucheny@uchicago.edu and Linzhuo Li: linzhuoli@uchicago.edu

*Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinators in advance.

The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences.

Sun, Yanfei – Empires and Religious Toleration

January 20, 2020
by linzhuoli
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(Jan. 23) Kyu-hyun Jo, “Unitary Socialism and an Intellectual History of the Korean War’s Origins as a Civil War”

EAST ASIA WORKSHOP: POLITICS, ECONOMY & SOCIETY Presents

 

“Unitary Socialism and an Intellectual History of the Korean War’s Origins as a Civil War 

Kyu-hyun Jo

UChicago History Alumni

 

Jan. 23rd, Thu 5:00-6:30 pm (NEW TIME FOR WINTER QUARTER!)

Tea Room, Social Science Research Building (2nd floor).

Refreshments will be provided

Abstract

In stark contrast to efforts to understand the Korean War as the Cold War’s first international conflict, very little has been discussed about the complexities of Communist activism in southern Korea under the leadership of Pak Hŏn-yŏng and the South Korean Workers’ Party (Nam Jo-suhn Roh-dong Dang), the largest Communist organization in southern Korea before the war. I fill this lacuna on the SKWP by closely examining South and North Korean documents and Record Groups 59, 242, and 554 to assess the party’s role in causing the Korean War.

I adopt a history-of-ideas perspective to examine the flow of post-liberation Korea’s political history through the SKWP’s rhetoric. The SKWP intensely battled against the Rightists to realize Communist political supremacy in southern Korea, and the Korean peninsula. In attempting to thoroughly Communize South Korea, the SKWP was simultaneously responsible for completely eradicating “Unitary Socialism” and the possibility for any peaceful ideological unification to be achieved by combining electoral democracy and economic socialism. The Korean War originated as a southern Communist and anti-Right-wing civil war; the war directly inherited the leitmotif of a Manichean battle between the Left and the Right which the SKWP willingly engaged in to assure Communist supremacy in the south. The Korean War was not originally a North Korean attempt to “liberate” South Korea but a South Korean civil war and the SKWP’s failed quest to lead the southern clash between the Left and the Right to a Communist victory by punishing pro-Japanese collaborators and “American imperialists.”

* Subscribe  to our workshop mailing-list at: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/info/east-asia

* Abstract or description of each presentation will be posted on our website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia

* Questions and comments can be addressed to the student coordinators Yuchen Yang: yucheny@uchicago.edu and Linzhuo Li: linzhuoli@uchicago.edu

*Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinators in advance.

The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences.

Kyu-hyun Jo – Unitary Socialism and an Intellectual History of the Korean War’s Origins as a Civil War

January 16, 2020
by linzhuoli
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(Jan. 16) “Orders of Explanation and Hermeneutic Cycles”

EAST ASIA WORKSHOP: POLITICS, ECONOMY & SOCIETY Presents

 

“Orders of Explanation and Hermeneutic Cycles 

Dingxin Zhao

Professor of Sociology

University of Chicago

 

 

Jan. 16th, Thu 5:00-6:30 pm (NEW TIME FOR WINTER QUARTER!)

Tea Room, Social Science Research Building (2nd floor).

Refreshments will be provided

* Subscribe  to our workshop mailing-list at: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/info/east-asia

* Abstract or description of each presentation will be posted on our website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia

* Questions and comments can be addressed to the student coordinators Yuchen Yang: yucheny@uchicago.edu and Linzhuo Li: linzhuoli@uchicago.edu

*Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinators in advance.

The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences.

Zhao, Dingxin – Orders of Explanation and Hermeneutic Cycles