Nov 3, Suzy Kim, “Socialist Feminisms Compared: The Flower Girl and The White-Haired Girl”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

“Socialist Feminisms Compared: The Flower Girl and The White-Haired Girl

Suzy Kim

Associate Professor, Department of Asian Languages & Cultures

Rutgers University

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, November 3, 2015

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract

Two revolutionary operas from two different contexts staged at different times – The Flower Girl (1972) from North Korea and The White-Haired Girl (1950) from China – have been noted for their similarities in plot. They are both set in the 1930s during the period of anti-imperialist armed struggle against Japan; the major source of conflict, however, is that between landlord and tenants; the main protagonist is a peasant girl whose family is ruined by the landlord; and the resolution to injustice is brought by a liberating army. Despite these similarities, the two female cultural icons offer quite different conceptualizations of gender and women through the protagonist’s rape and subsequent pregnancy in The White-Haired Girl. Through an analysis of this critical difference between the two works, this paper seeks to apprehend the diverse strategies to deal with the ‘woman question’ in socialist China and North Korea and the possibilities opened up by socialist feminisms as varied ways to address the status of women. In doing so, I deliberately challenge simplistic understandings of not only socialism, but more importantly, the socialist woman question, illustrating the extent to which feminism was indeed part of the socialist agenda.

 

Suzy Kim is Associate Professor in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at Rutgers University. She received her PhD in History from the University of Chicago. Her book Everyday Life in the North Korean Revolution, 1945-1950 (Cornell University Press, 2013) was awarded the 2015 James Palais Book Prize. She is currently preparing a monograph on the cultural history of gender formations in North Korea during the Cold War. Her teaching and research interests focus on modern Korean history with particular attention to social and cultural history, gender studies, and critical theory.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Yan Xu (xuyan@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Xi Song, Dali Yang and Dingxin Zhao

 

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

October 20 Workshop

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

“Chinese Public Attitudes toward the Environment: Patterns and Implications”

Chenyu Qiu and Dali Yang 

PhD Student, Harris School of Public Policy

Professor, Department of Political Science

The University of Chicago

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, October 20, 2015

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

 

Abstract

Perhaps no other issue in everyday life has attracted more attention from the Chinese public than air pollution after the 2013 “airpocalypse.” Conventional wisdom, along with theories such as “issue-attention cycle”, would predict an upsurge of public interest in improving the environment in China. Yet the empirical evidence is mixed. Using data from the 2003 and 2013 social surveys, we find only a very modest increase in the percentage of respondents who would put the environment among top three policy priorities. Meanwhile we find a strong contrast in environmental attitudes across income quartiles and believe rising income is the best predictor for changes in environmental concern. We explore the implications of our findings for environmental policy.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Yan Xu (xuyan@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Xi Song, Dali Yang and Dingxin Zhao

 

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Oct 6, Yang Yao, “Competence versus Incentive: Evidence from City Officials in China”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society and

Chicago Chinese Social Sciences Research Group present

 “Competence versus Incentive: Evidence from City Officials in China”

Yang Yao

Professor, National School of Development

Peking University

2015 Dr. Scholl Foundation Visiting Fellow on US-China Relations

 The Chicago Council on Global Affairs

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Room 122, Social Science Research Building, 1126 E 59th St.

 

Yang Yao is a professor at the China Center for Economic Research (CCER) and the National School of Development (NSD), Peking University. He currently serves as the director of CCER and the dean of NSD. He is a member of the China Finance 40 Forum. His research interests include economic transition and development in China. He has published dozens of research papers in international and domestic journals as well as several books on institutional economics and economic development in China. He is also a prolific writer for magazines and newspapers, including the Financial Times and the Project Syndicate. Dr. Yao was awarded the 2009 Sun Yefang Award in Economic Science, the 2008 and 2010 Pu Shan Award in International Economics and the 2008 Zhang Peigang Award in Development Economics, and was named the Best Teacher by the Peking University Student Union in 2006. Dr Yao obtained a BS in geography in 1986 and an MS in economics in 1989, both from Peking University, and his PhD in development economics from the department of agricultural and applied economics at the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 1996.

 

Abstract

This paper empirically studies the roles of competence and incentive in affecting the performance of public officials. We aim at answering two questions: Does competence or incentive matter more for economic performance? Do they tend to substitute or complement for each other? Using a unique dataset of Chinese city officials for the period 1994-2011, we estimate each official’s relative level of competence to promote economic growth and identify the effects of incentive using age limits and political cycles for promotion. We find that both competence and incentive matter for officials’ economic performance, but competence explains more than incentive. In addition, incentive matters less for more competent officials. Our results show that competence is more important than incentive to affect politicians’ economic performance.

 

For assistance and inquiries, please contact Yan Xu via xuyan@uchicago.edu or Yinan Su via yns@uchicago.edu.