East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society

May 27, 2016
by xuyan
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May 31, Eric Hundman, “Networks and Loyalties: The Social Roots of Military Disobedience in the Sino-French War”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

 “Networks and Loyalties: The Social Roots of Military Disobedience in the Sino-French War”

Eric Hundman

PhD Candidate, Department of Political Science

The University of Chicago

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

Abstract

Obedience to authority is often thought to be paramount in military organizations, but disobedience in various forms—including desertion, foot-dragging, rebellion, compromise, negotiation, surrender, mutiny, and outright insubordination—is common. This project explores such variation by explaining how commanders respond to their orders in war, with a focus on explaining when and why well-trained, ostensibly loyal commanders disobey their superiors. I first lay out a theory of how commanders judge their orders to be inappropriate, then show how the interaction between social network brokerage and loyalty determines their ultimate responses. I substantiate this theory using case studies of two Chinese commanders engaged in the Sino-French War (1883-1885): Xu Yanxu (徐延旭) and Bao Chao (鮑超). Both of these commanders judged their orders to be inappropriate, but one obeyed and the other disobeyed. Drawing on extensive primary-source data gathered from archives in China and Taiwan between 2012-2015, I leverage a variety of personal texts—including private correspondence, internal government documents, military communiqués, media reports, and official pronouncements—to show that these commanders judged their orders and assessed their loyalties as my theory predicts. In order to evaluate these commanders’ brokerage positions, I also constructed novel egocentric network databases that allow me to model changes in these commanders’ social networks over time. I therefore offer a new theory of military disobedience rooted in both structural and purposive mechanisms. Because this project develops new data from an understudied war that China fought in the late 19th century, it also contributes to debates on the strength of the Qing state, the development of China’s military, and China’s international relations.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Yan Xu (xuyan@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Xi Song, Dali Yang and Dingxin Zhao

 

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

May 18, 2016
by xuyan
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May 24, Le Lin, “Interstitial Emergence and The Making of Capitalism: The Thriving of Private Enterprises in China’s Education and Training Industry”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

 “Interstitial Emergence and The Making of Capitalism: The Thriving of Private Enterprises in China’s Education and Training Industry”

Le Lin

PhD Student, Department of Sociology

The University of Chicago

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

Abstract

This paper demonstrates an alternative trajectory of China’s capitalistic development to the existing economics, state-led and new institutional accounts: private economy could emerge and thrive interstitially between the state and the second economy. Drawing on China’s education and training industry (ETI) and education and training organizations (ETOs), I explore why private ETOs thrived and came to leading market status, despite that the Chinese state forbade private ownership and for-profit activities in the ETI. I show there was a particular kind of privately operated ETOs (Cowboy ETOs) that were founded by socially marginalized entrepreneurs and did not conform to the social norms new institutionalists considered as key to private economy development. Being situated in the interstitial space enabled Cowboy ETOs to draw resources and organizational repertoires from both the state and the second economy, providing these ETOs with more ambiguous identities than organizations of competing models. Cowboy ETOs not only benefited directly from their ambiguous identities, but they also gained advantages from the ambiguous regulations’ tolerating their practices. These ETOs outcompeted organizations of other ownerships and came to leading status, facilitating the diffusion of their commercial practices and making the ETI into a commercial industry led by private enterprises. I discuss the implications on state-market relations and origins and size of China’s private economy.

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Yan Xu (xuyan@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Xi Song, Dali Yang and Dingxin Zhao

May 10, 2016
by xuyan
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May 17, Xiao-bo Yuan, “Economies of Exposure: the ethics of concealment and revelation in Chinese Christianities”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

 “Economies of Exposure: the ethics of concealment and revelation in Chinese Christianities”

Xiao-bo Yuan

PhD Student, Department of Anthropology

The University of Chicago

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

Abstract

In this presentation, I draw on fieldwork conducted among Christian communities in the Nanjing metropolitan area to examine how aspirations to publicity or secrecy are expressed and contested within different (registered and unregistered) Christian communities. Through these cases, I examine how publicity and secrecy are calibrated and given value, and how assumptions about the intersections between religious belief and public life give shape to very different Christian institutional forms and practices in China. Rather than considering the above- and underground distinction to be primarily a product of state regulations and churches’ assent or resistance to government monitoring, this paper attends to the labors of Christian institutions in “opening up” and “going underground” as projects of producing specific kinds of (in)visibility. These labors are informed, I suggest, by “economies of exposure” — differentially distributed possibilities for challenging the state’s structures of legibility for religious organizations. Here, I explore the sensibilities toward publicity and secrecy, exposure and concealment, that organize the practices of Christians in China. What forms of publicity do churches aspire to, and how are they motivated to do so? How are conditions of secrecy maintained in other instances? What kinds of Christian subjects are produced through the work of revelation and concealment?

 

Workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

Student coordinator: Yan Xu (xuyan@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors: Xi Song, Dali Yang and Dingxin Zhao

 

This presentation is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

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